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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > Partial Winterization for Continued Sailing?
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Thread: Partial Winterization for Continued Sailing? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-19-2009 05:56 PM
pdqaltair
Yes, sustained north winds on the Bay cause very low tides.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine929 View Post
Nice thing about having a fairly simple boat design. Easy to get underway in various conditions. We just got 14" of snow. Doesn't sound like much until you see how the folks drive around here. Had a guy tailgating me for 5 miles last night when I went to pick up my daughter from work. We don't do a great job clearing snow either because we don't see much of it.

I understand what you say about the solitude. Peaceful. Went to sail a few weeks ago and the keel was resting on the bottom. Freakish wind and tidal conditions that left us with 4' of water. Been seeing a lot of flooding, also.
Several days ago I went out and had to winch my boat out of the slip! I have done this before - spin sheets to the dolphins and crank. I only do this if I am JUST touching, as the mud is very, very, very soft here. Also, the tide must be rising. Or I could just be more patient.

I am aground ~ 3 days a year, but that's what I get for a cheap slip. It only happens in the winter. Just a few weeks ago we had very high water - I think the range between the two was ~ 5 feet.
12-19-2009 04:57 PM
dakine929 Nice thing about having a fairly simple boat design. Easy to get underway in various conditions. We just got 14" of snow. Doesn't sound like much until you see how the folks drive around here. Had a guy tailgating me for 5 miles last night when I went to pick up my daughter from work. We don't do a great job clearing snow either because we don't see much of it.

I understand what you say about the solitude. Peaceful. Went to sail a few weeks ago and the keel was resting on the bottom. Freakish wind and tidal conditions that left us with 4' of water. Been seeing a lot of flooding, also.
12-19-2009 04:39 PM
pdqaltair
Yes, we are getting a good lick of snow, but I figure it will be fine after Christmas

Just a bit warmer, then. I'll take a broom and shovel. I went out 2 days ago and it was a fine day. A bit cold, but lovely.

I made a rather long post on my blog, below, regarding winter sailing and partial winterization. Sail Delmarva: Search results for winter sailing. Some of this is about the boat, but more of it is about the sailor, what works, and where the challenges are. The most important thing, I think, is to see it as a different thing than summer sailing, with different rewards. It's more contemplative and less decadent.

I do like decadence, really. The hot chocolate we take is fairly decadent, right up there with a dip in the pool, but different.

Happy winter! I will be happy if I can encourage just one person to keep sailing in the winter.
12-19-2009 04:28 PM
pdqaltair
I assume that you know that "frostbite" is a figure of speech...

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine929 View Post
Lines and sheets freezing? Frostbite? Thank you for the wake-up. I enjoy getting out of the house on weekends but hard to explain frostbite on Monday morning. I will be one of those fairweather sailors and draw the line at 50f. It would be nice to have a short re-commision for those 70f days that crop up in the winter here.

From what I have been reading about diesels, the engine preparation is the most involved. The oil on mine looks like it could be changed soon along with the antifreeze. Need to get my Yanmar book and read it this weekend. How often does the diesel filter need to be cleaned?
for dingy sailing outside of the normal season. It does not - directly, anyway - imply actual frostbite. Just a figure of speech.

Frostbite is not unheard of, though....
12-19-2009 03:20 PM
dakine929
Winterization

Winterized the boat in the nick of time. Folks at Norton's gave some sage advice. Bought a case of RV Antifreeze (6 gallons).

1. Pulled the SW intake hose to the engine. Stuck the hose in a bucket and started filling the bucket with antifreeze. Had the missus start the engine and my son watch the SW discharge until he saw a steady stream of antifreeze being pumped out. Powered down and replaced the line on the seacock. Took two gallons.

2. Pumped out all the potable water. Turned the water heater off. Poured 4 gallons of RV Antifreeze in the potable water tank. pumped antifreeze through both hot an cold faucets in the kitchen and head sinks.

3. Pulled the overboard discharge on the AC/Heat SW cooling line. connected an air hose from 9V air compressor. Opened the intake line and started the compressor until a steady stream of air was flowing through the intake then shut the through-hull valve and re-attached the overboard discharge line.

4. Pulled the porta-potti from the boat.

Now to go sailing during a warmer day this winter I will just need 2 gallons of Antifreeze for the engine. $10 is cheap for a daysail.
11-24-2009 04:32 AM
dakine929 Lines and sheets freezing? Frostbite? Thank you for the wake-up. I enjoy getting out of the house on weekends but hard to explain frostbite on Monday morning. I will be one of those fairweather sailors and draw the line at 50f. It would be nice to have a short re-commision for those 70f days that crop up in the winter here.

From what I have been reading about diesels, the engine preparation is the most involved. The oil on mine looks like it could be changed soon along with the antifreeze. Need to get my Yanmar book and read it this weekend. How often does the diesel filter need to be cleaned?
11-23-2009 06:24 PM
pdqaltair
Rock salt to keep the lines from freezing? Great story!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolatom View Post
For whoever asked, Google says ocean water freezes at 28F.

I remember frostbiting in Interclubs up East, we kept rock salt in the bilge and dunked the mainsheet in the brine. Then it would stay flexible down to about 15F, at which point it would make "square corners" at each turning block if you didn't ease and trim frequently. Also it got slushy and slippery.

Besides, we didn't really want to race when it was colder than 15 anyway. Although bailing snow, and sailing in the stuff, was pretty cool.

I was younger then, as was my crew.
However, there is a better way in the 21st century.

Ice climbers water proof climbing ropes by treating them every 1-2 years with wash-in water replant treatment, as sold in outdoor stores for water replant treatment of coats. Both are polyester, and it prevents the rope from absorbing enough water to freeze. There is also a special-purpose product called "rope-proof".

The treatments make the rope a bit softer, a bit slipperier (no too much, or climbers couldn't use it!) and do not reduce the strength. MUCH better, even for summer use than the myth of using fabric softener to treat and older rope. Try it! I do my ice climbing ropes every fall.
11-23-2009 12:26 PM
nolatom For whoever asked, Google says ocean water freezes at 28F.

I remember frostbiting in Interclubs up East, we kept rock salt in the bilge and dunked the mainsheet in the brine. Then it would stay flexible down to about 15F, at which point it would make "square corners" at each turning block if you didn't ease and trim frequently. Also it got slushy and slippery.

Besides, we didn't really want to race when it was colder than 15 anyway. Although bailing snow, and sailing in the stuff, was pretty cool.

I was younger then, as was my crew.
11-22-2009 11:33 AM
pdqaltair
Me thinks you need "winterizing" too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine929 View Post
The thing we noticed this weekend is how chilly it was on the water. Blue jeans won't cut it.
We sail all year. On out last boat, where the cockpit was open to the wind about January 1 ski goggles came out instead of sunglasses. Fleece socks. Windblocker fleece pants are great. A thin balakava under a thicker hat. Our new boat has a dodger, so less is required.

The freezing character of brackish water depend a lot on the location - the Bay itself very seldom gets ice, at least in the south, but creeks where the harbors are vary a great deal. Some are nearly fresh water. I would ask sailors who have been in your harbor whether it ices frequently. I know in Deale, the north fork of the harbor is often free while the south fork is solid.

Cheers!
11-22-2009 11:01 AM
lapworth I don't believe you need to worry untill we have a hard freeze for a few days. I only worry in Jan. and Feb.
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