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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Are you scared of wood?
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Thread: Are you scared of wood? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-05-2010 02:32 PM
cormeum
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
The current one is the largest and the oldest bought. She needs a little paint, some upgrade equipment. No more work than any older fiberglass boat. Each boat differed in construction and maintenance history. There isn't a single soft spot on Wandering Star, I aim to keep it that way. It won't be hard, because she's not dead or even sick.
Sail on.
That's been my experience. If you're not playing "catch up" the work is light and easily done.
04-04-2010 07:49 AM
WanderingStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Between wives I bought and lived aboard a CC Sea Skiff- fast, thirsty, comfy and solid, and I realized how little maintenance there is to do when you are not playing catch-up.
A very valid point, well put. My first wood boat was a dinghy that I built. She needed no repair for about 15 years. My second was 30 when I got her, but fairly sound. I worked on her each season, but not excessively. I never missed a sailing season. My third was about 38 years old, she needed more and more, finally requiring a rebuild. The current one is the largest and the oldest bought. She needs a little paint, some upgrade equipment. No more work than any older fiberglass boat. Each boat differed in construction and maintenance history. There isn't a single soft spot on Wandering Star, I aim to keep it that way. It won't be hard, because she's not dead or even sick.
Sail on.
04-04-2010 02:22 AM
KeelHaulin I'm not afraid of wood; I'm afraid of what munches on wood (clams, worms, termites, bacteria, etc).

You are doing a great job with Oh Joy, Charlie. But that's a TON of effort to get her re-built. I've seen many, many boats like yours get started and never make it out of the yard because of the patience and dilligence needed to see the project through to being finished. Finding the problems is one thing; having the know how and skills to fix them is quite another; and most mere mortals don't have the aptitude to do what you find to be "easy".

Be sure and post some pictures of the re-launch and sailing in all her glory!!
04-03-2010 11:49 PM
LookingForCruiser I'm scared of wood, because of the indignity of having my boat eaten by clams

04-03-2010 09:13 PM
CharlieCobra Hear hear. I didn't find Oh Joy, she found me, literally...
04-03-2010 08:53 PM
bljones Wood doesn't scare me, but neglect hidden by cosmetics does. My first boat was a Mirror dinghy, so I cut my teeth on wood maintenance, wood repair, and the importance of not getting behind the maintenance curve.
Then, apparently i got stupid.
My next boat was a 27' Owens cruiser, with a fresh paint job, and suspiciously, the only painted transom in the entire marina. Said transom promptly attempted to exit the boat when hauled for winter after my first and last season of ownership.
Between wives I bought and lived aboard a CC Sea Skiff- fast, thirsty, comfy and solid, and I realized how little maintenance there is to do when you are not playing catch-up.

And last fall i found another one, in need of a new steward. You don't own a wooden boat- you're simply the caretaker, maintaining the legacy.

Funny thing about wooden boats is that you never find the right boat- it finds you, and when it does, all of your rationalizations and rules of boat ownership fly out the window. If she is the right boat, you WILL resuscitate her and love every minute and every dollar spent, and there are few fiberglass boats that make me feel the same way.
04-03-2010 08:07 PM
MedSailor "Hello my name is Medsailor and I'm a recovering wooden boat owner. It's been 762 days since I have owned a wooden boat"

Chorus: "Hi medsailor"

Am I scared of wood?

YES.


Why? Because the care and feeding of them is largely a lost art. I tried to learn everything I could and be a good wooden boat owner but nobody told me that electrolysis near wood would eat it away in a way that is invisible to visual inspection. My keel timber (8"10" solid oak) and it's floor timbers which supported my 3,500lb keel had the tensile and sheer strength of cooked spinach and I didn't even know it. Good thing I didn't sail her hard those last couple years. Working with wood is very gratifying, but worrying about cracking a plank in a storm (again, because I did that too) almost gave me another ulcer.

On the plus side, based on my experience over 7 years with many many problems and near-sinkings with that boat, I do believe that wooden boats are highly favored by the gods of the sea, which is very important. May the gods be with you and your boat.

Medsailor
Proud owner of an ridiculously overbuilt full keeled plastic boat with an encapsulated (ie doesn't fall off) keel.


PS If you every want to talk bilge-pumps pm me. I'm quite sure I have more experience with them than anyone on earth.
04-03-2010 07:34 PM
Architeuthis Personally if I was going to go through all that I would put the effort into a steel boat. Like wood they can be easily worked on by the owner with basic tools and are little more than thousand jobs done right.

But glass is cheaper in both time and money so glass it is for me.

That said I do hope that wood boats never rot away, they are what boating has been for thousands of years. That alone makes them a worthy project.
04-03-2010 12:40 PM
LABRADORCOASTER About 15 yrs ago I bought an old tired/retired lobster fishing boat (wooden of course) Built in 1971, she was open to stack lobster pots, a plywood box in the middle of housed a 292 chev 6 cylinder with a straight pipe stuck up thru the middle of it.

I fell in love with her sweet sheer, her long slim hull.(40' long x 10' beam)...and her asking price... Well I put on my rose colored glasses paid the 2,000$ and hauled her off the shore line and drove my baby home.

Where am I going with this you ask? Well after the honeymoon, I began poking around in her past and came up with quite a few questionable areas, soft spots in the planking, broken frames etc.

The hull is pine strip plank, edge nailed with steam bent timbers. The first small piece of planking I removed was about 1 1\2'' x 14'' long and i didn't sleep that night. ''She'll never float again''. Since that day I have replaced all of the garboard planks, all of the stern section from one waterline to the other, and at one point could go in and out thru the bow to get tools etc.

Steamed in new timbers in 75% of the boat, replaced the biddings under the motor, (also put in a John Deere diesel). Built a cabin and basically have never stopped with projects, improvements, upgrades etc.

Would I do it again, probably NOT, but every weekend when we are anchored in some remote cove, a scotch in hand there is such a feeling of contentment and satisfaction that I have no doubt in my mind that it was worth every bit of effort expended.

Wood is quiet, warm and if you keep the fresh water out of the mix will last a long, long time.

I think it comes down to wither you are a guy who likes to work on your boat, be it puttering or more extensive stuff or you leave all that stuff for the guys at the yard.

15 yrs ago I could not have afforded to purchase a 40' Pleasure Yacht. I would have had to work hard, save my money for 15yrs or so before buying.

I choose to buy a PROJECT, worked hard at it yes but as the saying goes, '' it's only hard work if you don't enjoy what your doing''. Plus I have gotten to use the boat every summer for the 15 yrs,during which time the kids were young (read willing to go with Mom and Dad...).

Anyhow folks a wooden boat, - the right path for everyone - certainly not,
but just don't run past that woody at your yard, beneath the peeling paint there lies possibilities. Today I am installing a couple of cabinet doors in the wheelhouse. (And I gotta get at it !)

All the best, Wilson
12-31-2009 06:04 PM
WanderingStar If my boat weren't wooden, I could not afford her. And you can search her stem to stern, there's no rot.
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