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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Multi-hulls?
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Thread: Multi-hulls? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-14-2006 10:50 AM
sailingdog
They ain't all ugly

Quote:
Originally Posted by owlmtn
A mono hull when done right is a wonderful blending of form and function. Multi hulls, to my mind, are only function.
Multihulls come in both beautiful and ugly designs. Few sailboats, either multihull or monohull, are purely designed from function.
04-14-2006 07:14 AM
owlmtn A mono hull when done right is a wonderful blending of form and function. Multi hulls, to my mind, are only function.
04-13-2006 12:01 PM
Rickm505
floating condos

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailandoar
very comfortable floating condos. Not very nimble.....
There has been a growing tendancy to produce bigger and wider cats. 25 years ago a 30 foot boat could be called average and 35 - 40 feet huge. Today 37-42 feet is average, so I would agree with your floating condo remark. Handling has taken a back seat to the 'condo' concept, but I would imagine that sea keeping has improved somewhat. Higher bridge decks, and a smaller aspect ratio has to be better, right? Then again, I guess if you are going to be comfortable, why go 1/2 way?

My cat is only 14 feet wide and boy is she affected by wind. I can only imagine what it's like manuvering a 20 -22 foot beam in a 20 knot breeze.

We can't blame the boat manufacturers as they are just giving their customers what they want.

Floating Condos!!

Rick in Florida
04-13-2006 11:40 AM
sailandoar Look at the Gemini cats, 14' beam lets you into many/most marina slips, 18"-24" draft with boards up means you can always find an anchorage that is nice and pretty and safe and you can let her dry out with the tide for anchorage or maintenance purposes. Diesel with an outdrive foot means you have no underwater running gear to worry about and complicate things.
Read the James Wharram literature for a very good overview of cats and cat design.

I have chartered 40'+ cats in the Bahamas and with 20'+ beam and 4'+ draft they are very comfortable floating condos. Not very nimble, very hard to 'slip into a marina', and you are competing with the monohulls for what is becoming VERY limited medium draft anchorage real-estate while cruising. Shallow draft anchorages, when you have a boat that gives you that option, will more than DOUBLE the places you can drop the hook. Also when cruising the nicest quietest little nooks and crannies are mostly shallow. Being able to let the boat dry out with the tide can allow you to find a very safe anchorage, hurricane hole, and to save BIG $$$ on haulout charges.

We are loving our schooner but the next boat or the second boat if we start up a charter fleet will be 24" to 30" draft. Cats are very comfortable places to hang out on. Much Much more comfortable than any monohull of the same length, unless it is a sailing scow/barge.
04-12-2006 10:12 PM
sailingdog
Generalizations are bad to make...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gershel
FASTER;

You're right, I should lighten up. There are just so many unknowledgable "bashers" out there.

As far as living aboard, you can't compare a tri to a cat. A tri is a mono with outriggers. A cat with a 20' beam is a boat with a 20" wide interior. As a live aboard a cat can't be beat.

Concerning speed, most cruising cats are about the same or very slightly faster than a mono, especially when loaded down for cruising.

Marc
Actually, not all cats with a 20' bean have a 20' interior, and not all trimarans are monohulls with outriggers. Blanket generalizations like this are pretty ignorant of what the current state of multihulls is at.

For example: the R33 catamaran doesn't have a solid bridgedeck, all the living accommodations are in the two hulls, no huge, spacious salon. Some of the Newick designed trimarans, like the one at http://www.wingo.com/newick/echo_ld-l.gif have a solid bridgedeck with accommodations inside the bridgedeck.
04-07-2006 04:53 PM
Rickm505
Slips hardly ever open up at Harbor Town

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaLeLu
Slips hardly ever open up at Harbor Town. However - you might check again this weekend. I noticed that the cat that used to be in the first slip on D dock has not been there for about a month.
Really?? (as he reaches for a phone book) I'm looking for their number now!!

Rick
04-07-2006 04:40 PM
Rickm505
Once you've gone 'Cat' ..You never go back!

Quote:
Originally Posted by alanl
Like most things, with cats there is an experience curve to master. I have taken a lot of unnecessary gear off mine in the last 12 months and have not noticed its absence. The sailing characteristics need getting used to, but after a lot of trouble initially, I can now steer pretty much on the sheets alone, hardly touching the wheel.
I couldn't agree more. I also removed heavy items which the previous owner found useful, and was amazed at the difference it made concerning handling. My helm is completely balanced thru winds of F4 after I tuned the rig.

I now consider monohulls 1/2 boats (smile).

Rick
04-07-2006 04:00 PM
alanl Henryvand speaks from experience - I sail a 30' catamaran and know plenty of others who do and none of us would ever go back to a mono. Sure, there are some advantages with the latter for serious cruising IF (and it is a big if) it is the right boat for the job, but I'm not convinced that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Read Chichester's account of Gypsy Moth IV if you think every mono designed by a professional sails well! Consider the Winston Churchill (a dream boat if you ever saw one) that sank in the Sydney-Hobart.

I am not going to get into the old debates about pounding and stability of multihulls, suffice to say that most of the prejudice is based on way out-of-date information. Read the books by Derek Kelsall, Chris White and others who actually design and build multihulls and can speak with real knowledge.Sail a Farrier F9a and you will be amazed at the sailing qualities (admittedly this is a tri, not a cat)

Like most things, with cats there is an experience curve to master. I have taken a lot of unnecessary gear off mine in the last 12 months and have not noticed its absence. The sailing characteristics need getting used to, but after a lot of trouble initially, I can now steer pretty much on the sheets alone, hardly touching the wheel. Tacking can be tricky but again, there are simple techniques like letting the jib pull the head round before sheeting in on the other side.

Regards

Alanl, Sydney
04-07-2006 02:27 PM
LaLeLu Slips hardly ever open up at Harbor Town. However - you might check again this weekend. I noticed that the cat that used to be in the first slip on D dock has not been there for about a month, and there have been transient boats in the slip. He could just be hauled for bottom work and still paying the slip rent - but doesn't hurt to ask. It's a real shallow and wide slip. They have a long waiting list for slips, but that one isn't a slip that many can fit in b/c it is so shallow. Cheers - see you at the flea market.
04-07-2006 01:32 PM
Rickm505
Flea market

Yep, I know the marina well and I'll be there bright and early Tomorrow morning!! Who could resist a marine flea market? They say it's the largest in central Florida.

I tried getting a slip in there last year but the only ones that came available were too narrow. Oh... the other downside of catamaran ownership, our width.

Thanks for the invite! You may just see us tomorrow!

Rick
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