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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Engines > Diesel > yanmar 2qm 20 will not start
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Thread: yanmar 2qm 20 will not start Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-08-2010 02:26 PM
30Irwin Your feedback is extremely comforting, Wayne! Good to know I was on the right track, and thank you for the additional pointers.

I'll watch the tension on that banjo bolt, Sailingdog.

Thank you.
03-08-2010 12:17 PM
sailingdog One word of warning on fuel lines... if you overtighten the banjo bolts on a fuel like you can often cause an air leak at the banjo bolt... so be careful about tightening them.
03-08-2010 12:02 PM
wwilson
Quote:
Originally Posted by 30Irwin View Post
So: I don't know why that little finger pump doesn't work. And also, I'm inclined to believe that on my engine I don't really have to worry about loosening the injectors.

Anybody have any thoughts on this? And an additional question: if I were doing this properly, would I always have to remove both injectors (two cylinders), or would just one be ok?

Final question! prior to getting to the secondary filter, I tried opening the valve at the bottom of my Raccor primary (it's an old one: think it says model 2010. Has the glass bowl attached to a housing, with the filter inside the housing) and nothing really came out except a few drops. So then I unscrewed the top of the filter cap, and it came rushing out. Is that normal: is there a vacuum in there that prohibits the flow?

Thanks for any thoughts.
30Irwin,

1) The finger pump works when all goes well - which it does most of the time. But in any case it is always a pain in the... index finger.

2) No only loosen one fuel connector on the injector farthest from the secondary fuel filter (on the engine). Don't remove it, we don't want to get any grit or dirt in that. Just loosen it on the threads a turn or so. That way the air can blow by and the whole fuel system gets bled.

3) Let the engine starter do the work when you give up on the finger pump. Often if the engine has stopped with the lobe not positioned properly, then the finger pump will be doing absolutely nothing - you could pump it all day.

4) With only 1 cylinder "off-line" the engine will try to start as it is cranked. A 4 or more cylinder engine will start and hobble along on its working cylinders. Holding the wrench on the fuel connector nut, pull it snug after the engine has forced out its air. This is usually a 2 person job. The engine will then start. Careful what you touch with the wrench. It can be easy to short the 12V causing a startling (usually harmless) spark.

Most people would apply common sense with this technique and NOT run their starter battery dead, or crank the starter motor so long that they fill the exhaust elbow and flood the engine and it is always good to avoid the spinning stuff on the front of the engine, hopefully you've read this far...

5) I have the same Racor: if you opened the water bleed screw (bottom) (while the engine was off) you probably need to loosen the cap on top of the unit to get fuel (and water if any) to flow out the bottom.
03-08-2010 12:20 AM
30Irwin
my bleeding experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwilson View Post
Hi Rik,

No, i'm not a diesel mechanic either. I did have a very good diesel mechanic teach me how to bleed the engine though.

There is no reason to be anxious about loosening the injector (at the cylinder) no harm will be done in any case. I did not mean detach - only loosen a turn or two. The engine's cranking power and the fuel pump's effectiveness are just a whole lot more effective than the little "finger pumps" normally used. And, if the air is in the portion of the fuel line between the finger pump (near the secondary filter) and the injector, the pump has a very hard time expelling it.

Wayne
I wish I'd read this a day ago, Wayne. I had to tighten a gas line fitting at the tank this weekend because there was a leak. This introduced air, of course. I haven't bled the air from my 2QM15 before but I took a swing at it. I loosened the bleed screw on the secondary filter, and started working away with the finger pump. After about 15 odd minutes I'd run out of any strength in my fingers, and I still didn't have fuel coming out. In a bit of frustration, I just cranked the engine at half throttle and it kind of caught a bit. So I stopped, went below, and obviously fuel had been spraying. I tightened the filter bleed screw and went back up to crank. It caught almost right away, kept sputtering and spewing black smoke, then started running. It took about 1 minute for the engine to smooth out, than ran for an hour just fine!

So: I don't know why that little finger pump doesn't work. And also, I'm inclined to believe that on my engine I don't really have to worry about loosening the injectors.

Anybody have any thoughts on this? And an additional question: if I were doing this properly, would I always have to remove both injectors (two cylinders), or would just one be ok?

Final question! prior to getting to the secondary filter, I tried opening the valve at the bottom of my Raccor primary (it's an old one: think it says model 2010. Has the glass bowl attached to a housing, with the filter inside the housing) and nothing really came out except a few drops. So then I unscrewed the top of the filter cap, and it came rushing out. Is that normal: is there a vacuum in there that prohibits the flow?

Thanks for any thoughts.
02-27-2010 01:08 PM
lordpoltimore found the problem , on this engine the injector pump is built inside the engine all you see is 2 pipes comimg out though a housing on this housing behind the pipes is a bleed screw there was still air there once i bleed there engine started.
02-23-2010 11:26 AM
Stu Jackson A friend of mine had this problem. He never went so far as to pop an injector, and I wouldn't either. Turns out he had bought a dented new fuel filter. Grabbed is backup and put it on, bled the engine and all was fine. So in addition to checking the O ring, check the body, too.
02-21-2010 05:57 PM
lordpoltimore thankyou all the engine ran fine up to the point were i starved it of fuel , i have bleed it at the lift pump and then at the injector i let it bleed or a minute with the engine on its decompression mode there was fuel pouring out as i open the injector is already under pressure , the diesel was from hess gas station the engine , the oring on the filter was replaced
02-21-2010 04:00 PM
wwilson Hi Rik,

No, i'm not a diesel mechanic either. I did have a very good diesel mechanic teach me how to bleed the engine though.

There is no reason to be anxious about loosening the injector (at the cylinder) no harm will be done in any case. I did not mean detach - only loosen a turn or two. The engine's cranking power and the fuel pump's effectiveness are just a whole lot more effective than the little "finger pumps" normally used. And, if the air is in the portion of the fuel line between the finger pump (near the secondary filter) and the injector, the pump has a very hard time expelling it.

Wayne
02-21-2010 03:29 PM
rikhall
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwilson View Post
Loosen the No. 1 injector and crank the engine. If you see fuel being expelled, your fuel pump is working.
I am not a mechanic and Wilson might be, but me, I would leave the "loosening of the injector" to the last thing I check.

I have the exact same engine and until I got the fuel line bled up to the filter on the engine, mine would not run either. In the ten plus years I have had Yanmars, I have never had to bleed further than the "on the engine" fuel filter.

Diesels are easy - all they need is fuel, air and cooling. I have never sailed outside of Canada and the USA and here, I have never encountered bad fuel.

Best of luck with this.

Rik
02-21-2010 02:56 PM
wwilson Loosen the No. 1 injector and crank the engine. If you see fuel being expelled, your fuel pump is working. If not, let it crank a few times to be sure the air gets forced out. If the engine tries to start, tighten the injector (while it is cranking - and spraying some diesel) and it probably will start. When you crank the engine for a while, it is often a good idea to close the raw water intake. This may seem counterintuitive, but the engine will certainly not overheat during cranking (or for quite a few minutes after it starts). The closed raw water intake will keep the engine from filling the exhaust elbow then flooding the engine with seawater. Do reach in and open the seawater inlet once it restarts - mind the "spinning" parts on the front of the engine.
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