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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Which boat would best suit this challenge?
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Thread: Which boat would best suit this challenge? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-05-2010 12:15 PM
Jeff_H Except for your opening sentence, taking the quote from my post in context, I don't think that you and I disagree at all in our posted positions.

Jeff
03-05-2010 11:49 AM
Architeuthis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
But to me this seems like a very narrow personal challenge and one that seemingly wastes so much of life's most valuable and irreplaceable resource, time. While it should not matter to you what I or anyone says to you about this challenge, still and all, it seems to me that a part of making a challenge worthwhile is to define it in a way that it accomplishes as much as possible.

Staying alone, in and of itself, may accomplish something for you personally, but it seems to me that to have the extreme luxury of taking a year alone, without having other goals seems wasteful. We know nothing about you. We do not know your tallents and abilities, your intellect, your personality, but it would seem that taking a year alone should result in an exploitation of who you are, producing something meaningful for the rest of your life, if not for mankind as a whole. It seems like it should be a time to learn, to grow, to create, and to emerge a better person.
An excellent arguement against sailing, particularly cruising which requires so much time, effort and money to accomplish....well to some people nothing, a total waste.

Having done most of my adventuring alone, and held many jobs in remote areas often in islolation I can say such opinions are...well lets just say the different views on solitude are as old as man.

Taking a time off, solitude, is a luxury but for some it is needed. For some solitude is soul destroyiing for others it is a period of renewal and more.

I would suggest everyone should be able to take a year, maybe two or three off to be alone to not be driven to accomplish something in the eyes of others.

For most it will not be a waste. Only they in hindsight, can judge that but few who have done it think of such time as wasted.
03-05-2010 10:54 AM
smackdaddy Wow Jeff. +1000.
03-05-2010 10:46 AM
cormeum ^^^ Very well said , Jeff.
03-05-2010 10:17 AM
Jeff_H With everything else going on in my life I can't believe that I actually have been thinking about this thread in a serious manner, but truth be told, I have.

At some level I completely understand the skepticism with which this is being viewed. Hang around the online sailing world long enough and you see posts inquiring about almost any lifestyle idea, and almost every idea known to man be presented in the context of boats and the sea.

And these days the word, 'Challenge' seems to get bandied about in all kinds of venues to the point that the meaning of the word itself seems a bit challenged. So, it is easy to become a bit jaded.

But as I thought about my own reaction to this thread I had a couple of thoughts. While I have come to believe that there is no single right answer to almost any sailing question, at least for me, there are some things that seem more correct than others. This is my personal take and my best well-meaning advise, so here goes.

To begin with life is short and as the Welch aphorism goes, "You are dead for a very long time". My first thought is that few of us can afford to decide to do anything for a year that does not add value to our lives. What you choose to value is up to you, but to me life is too short not to be lived as fully as each of us can posibly live our lives. If you are going to challenge yourself to do something for a year, then I would suggest that it better be something that is truly meaningful to you and which leaves you a better person at the end than when you started.

Again, speaking only for myself, the best challenges are those that are purely personal. They are driven by what is inside of you. They have little to nothing to do with proving things to others.

In that regard, if being alone for a year on a boat, without getting off the boat, has meaning to you, then it should not matter that others have spent more time alone without getting off their boat, or that you would not be setting a record, or that others think what you are doing makes no sense to them.

But to me this seems like a very narrow personal challenge and one that seemingly wastes so much of life's most valuable and irreplaceable resource, time. While it should not matter to you what I or anyone says to you about this challenge, still and all, it seems to me that a part of making a challenge worthwhile is to define it in a way that it accomplishes as much as possible.

Staying alone, in and of itself, may accomplish something for you personally, but it seems to me that to have the extreme luxury of taking a year alone, without having other goals seems wasteful. We know nothing about you. We do not know your tallents and abilities, your intellect, your personality, but it would seem that taking a year alone should result in an exploitation of who you are, producing something meaningful for the rest of your life, if not for mankind as a whole. It seems like it should be a time to learn, to grow, to create, and to emerge a better person.

Which gets me back to the question in the original post, what is the right boat?. To me the right boat, will emerge from the definition of your challenge. If you expand the definition of your challenge your right boat may change. If your goal is sedentary, to simply hermit out, then anything big enough to hold what you need to live and cheap enough to afford will work.

But I can only hope that you will expand your challenge to yourself to something broader and richer than being a seaborne hermit. The world of sailing, and the world of the sea offers an opportunity to experience the true richness of being alive in so many ways; voyaging under sail potentially offers a magic carpet that exposes you to so much of the beauty and reality of the world, and provides so much of chance to experience the wonder of mankind's diversity, so much of an opportunity to grow and truly challenge yourself, mentally, physically and for some perhaps spiritually.

But that takes a boat that is capable of voyaging, and the skills, discipline, and resourcefulness to sail her well and husband your limited resources.

Really making that happen, especially using only your own resources, is a challenge, a big challenge, but the rewards can be bigger than life itself.

Respectfully,
Jeff
03-04-2010 04:40 PM
joeybkcmo was wondering if I had missed something, so I went back and re-read the 1st post - then went to the facebook page- and still think I am missing something. If you are wanting to spend a year on a boat, without getting off, or anybody getting on, then go for a pontoon/barge. You don't have to go any place to meet your goal, you just need enough storage space for what you will need for a year. Of course you will need some $$, even if it is not frills. Water maker, something to power it with, food (unless the diet is fish and rice), some way of cooking the food. And unless you have one heck of a holding tank or a couple of composting heads, you will need to be outside of the discharge restricted areas.
03-04-2010 04:18 PM
smackdaddy fenix, dude, you really need to read about the Reid Stowe guy. A lot of the attitude you're seeing to this kind of venture springs from everyone following Void Ho!'s seriously whacked exploits over the past few years.

Here's a taste...



The best place I've seen for the discussion about this kind of thing (and all it's good and bad sides) is on Sailing Anarchy here...

Couple Cruise for 1000 Days

Now compared to SA, the skepticism you've seen here on SN is EXTREMELY mellow as you'll see. So take it all with a grain of salt once you know the whole story. You should also see a film called "Deep Water". A year on a boat with no outside contact can make people do some whacky things.

BTW - I think JRP's advice above is great. Sailing around the world alone for a year would be far more fun than hanging out at a mooring.
03-04-2010 03:29 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectfenix View Post
lol.. good stuff man.. Like I said before.. these people get off the boat.. they may live on them, but they get to get off, walk around, do things, they're not on the boat for a full year without leaving it.. thanks for the advice though.. I'll just continue to see if I can make this challenge happen though.. If I can't oh well, if I can it will be interesting..
No, you misunderstood. Reid did not get off the boat. He was at sea the entire time, alone for close to two years.

Edit: Just double checked. His girlfriend left at Day 306. He's now on Day 1043 at sea. He himself has not left the boat that entire time. Since her departure, he has spent 737 days alone on a boat at sea. That's MORE THAN two years (and still counting), alone on a boat, at sea, without getting off.
03-04-2010 03:22 PM
projectfenix lol.. good stuff man.. Like I said before.. these people get off the boat.. they may live on them, but they get to get off, walk around, do things, they're not on the boat for a full year without leaving it.. thanks for the advice though.. I'll just continue to see if I can make this challenge happen though.. If I can't oh well, if I can it will be interesting..
03-04-2010 03:07 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectfenix View Post
Wow.. Lots of replies.. and several of you have been quite nice and informative, and a few have just been bitter, but what else can you expect with internet forums..

Yes I am young and dumb, and yes I am poor, do I want money? Of course, but that's not what this is about.. This whole idea came from when some friends and I were discussing yet another stupid "How much money would it take to do this" kind of thing.. I have friends that say they would have to get at least a million dollars to live in solitude on a boat for a year.. and I said I would do it as long as it didn't cost me anything.. not for the money, but for doing something a little crazy that would let me prove to myself I could meet the challenge head on and win..

and sure, there are a lot of people sailing on their own and it's not some novel idea any more.. but honestly have you ever heard of anyone who did step off their boat for an entire year? I mean that's a long time in solitude.. that means no sex for a year.. it's not about money.. Money is required, money that I don't have, but I'm not doing this so I can make money, I'm simply trying something wild.. I'm sorry that will offend people who get up everyday hating their life, people whose only outlet is to come on here and bash the ideas and dreams of others.. I'm 27, pretty much broke, I have no idea what I want to even do with my life, or what I'm supposed to be, but you know what, I'm still happy.. I may not have a lot of material things or a long list of status builders but I'm smiling more and laughing harder than most anyone I know..

Wish me luck or wish me hate, we'll see if it all goes down.. Cheers!

Murdock
Sorry, Murdock. But it's been done already. You can read about it here:

Reid Stowe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reid Stowe had a girlfriend along for a while, but she got pregnant and left. So he's only spent about two years alone on the boat, I guess. But maybe he is more motivated than you (something about overdue child support payments?)

Beyond the logistical aspects, I see no challenge whatsoever in locking yourself inside a boat and not talking to anyone for a year. That's no different than going off and living like a hermit (in a remote shack, an RV, a city apartment, whatever) just to say you did it. If you're going that route regardless, why not try an igloo or a yurt instead? There are even some reclusive monastaries that might take you in, where you can take a vow of silence.

If you want to challenge yourself, save some money, find a boat to fix up and go sailing. If you lack the resources or wherewithal, consider putting your time to productive use and join one of the services. If it's water you're attracted to, the USCG or Navy would be happy to have you I'm sure.

All the best of luck with whatever you do.
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