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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Local Market Flush with Used Hunters and Catalinas...
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Thread: Local Market Flush with Used Hunters and Catalinas... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-11-2010 11:47 AM
BoxedUp
Quote:
Originally Posted by zboss View Post
Do you think that I am out of my mind to try and buy a cheap boat (in good condition) that is 30 years old and expect to recoup what I paid for it? Frankly, I just right-off any fixes or improvements.
You really won't know what condition the boat is in until you have a survey done. I've seen plenty of boats that "looked" good but after a more thorough inspection, they were not good boats - just cheap.
03-08-2010 01:29 AM
TakeFive
Quote:
Originally Posted by zboss View Post
I see... and that is correct... sell boat A, add more cash, buy boat B...

It is our goal to get closer to a 36 or 40 in very good shape, eventually. It has the long term accommodations and features we want. However, for just starting out a 26-28 may be slightly too small for four adults (ourselves and our in-laws) and 2 children for a week, so we are looking for something for 4 adults and two kids.

I have a couple of features that are important to me, outside of structural soundness... the main one being an easily accessible engine. I have assisted in a couple of engine issues over the years and without a doubt having access to the mechanicals without being an yoga instructor is very important.

A port-a-potty simply won't cut it but if I can find a great bargain, it is possible that I might consider installing one of those composting toilets. However, I have not told the wife that if we went that route we would have to carry weeks worth of crap out of the boat.
Fitting 4 adults + 2 kids for a week will take a LOT OF BOAT, especially if 2 of them are your in-laws You'll need much more than 26-28 feet.

I had a similar issue, and got pushed up to 32-34 feet before coming to my senses and buying a 25 footer for daysails. We'll charter 34-40 footers for the 1 week/year that we want to take an extended trip with the kids.

And while you may think the market is flush with all sorts of options, by the time you weed out the crap that you'll work on for months/years before starting to have fun, and the boats whose owners have a distorted view of their boat's worth, you'll be lucky to find one or two that you really want. Even in a down market, most boats are project boats (especially FSBOs), and truly attractive boats maintain their value pretty well.

If you're looking on the Chesapeake, there's a 1985 Catalina 27 in Baltimore that was listed on Craigslist (asking $8500). We had a test ride in November. The current owner is a very skilled artistic metalworker, a maintains it meticulously. Lots of updates, including new sails, refurbished pedestal, nice gauges, brand new keel bolts, dinghy, etc. We went with a different boat because my wife wanted perch seats and walk-through transom, which you cannot find until mid-90s boats. I can't find it on Craigslist right now - maybe they sold it. But keep an eye out for it. I can supply the guy's email in a PM if you want to pursue.

There's another guy who posts here who is looking to sell his C27:

Catalina 27 '1980' sailboat

I never linked up with this guy, so I didn't get inside it. I did get a quick glimpse from the outside, but it was dark outside. It has a really big dodger/bimini customization.
03-07-2010 06:17 PM
kd3pc Z

sabres and tartans in your price and age range, can be bargains...they sail well, hold their value well, and are reasonably easy to work on. Good support from the factory. There are a couple of Shannon for sale on the bay, and while a bit more pricey, hold their value very well and have super quality.

Pacifc Seacraft are excellent boats, and sail well also...mid 80's should be a good place to start
03-06-2010 01:30 PM
zboss
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
I understand this to mean that he would sell the first boat and add more cash to get a bigger boat. I think others in this thread misread it as he would try to sell the first boat for more than he paid for it.

Regards,
Brad
I see... and that is correct... sell boat A, add more cash, buy boat B...

It is our goal to get closer to a 36 or 40 in very good shape, eventually. It has the long term accommodations and features we want. However, for just starting out a 26-28 may be slightly too small for four adults (ourselves and our in-laws) and 2 children for a week, so we are looking for something for 4 adults and two kids.

I have a couple of features that are important to me, outside of structural soundness... the main one being an easily accessible engine. I have assisted in a couple of engine issues over the years and without a doubt having access to the mechanicals without being an yoga instructor is very important.

A port-a-potty simply won't cut it but if I can find a great bargain, it is possible that I might consider installing one of those composting toilets. However, I have not told the wife that if we went that route we would have to carry weeks worth of crap out of the boat.
03-06-2010 12:51 PM
sailguy26 I've noticed that nobody has mentioned PHRF. It's a performance rating system and can be used to evaluate a given models sailing characteristics. USSailing has a list with over1000 models.
Guy
03-06-2010 11:43 AM
blt2ski Sorry Blue,

The what I believe to be the main reason many of these builders are gone, is the fed government put a 10-15% tax on luxury items, ie boats for about 5 yrs, pretty much put multiple companies out of biz here in the states during the early 80's.

In the end tho, for the OP, it would be better to buy a reasonably known boat brd from that era vs a one off or some other type. I have an early Jeanneau that was brought over in the 80's, Beneteau has a few from that time too.

You might also find that boats fro defunct builders like Islander, Ranger, San juan, Ericson, Olsen, among others to work very well too, and will also sell quickly if clean etc when you go to sell and get a larger boat. You may also find that a 30'ish foot boat to be just fine too. I would like to go up to a mid 30, but frankly, my 29.5' boat does everything I need just fine. Excet no shower for spouse, But the times we need one is 1-3 days a yr out of 40-50 time out.........not sure it is worth it, but I did not say that.

Good luck.

marty
03-06-2010 08:59 AM
KindOfBlue A reason that some of the manufacturers from the 70's are no longer in buisiness is because they couldn't sell their boats for a high enough price to cover the cost of high quality construction. At least that's what I tell myself because I own a Bristol, who are no longer in buisiness. I think that there is some truth to this, so don't rule out builders who are no longer building boats.
03-06-2010 08:01 AM
Bene505
Quote:
Originally Posted by zboss View Post
...I intend on paying cash for a very inexpensive boat and sailing it for 2 maybe 3 years before trying to sell it and double up my new cash and get a better or larger boat...
I understand this to mean that he would sell the first boat and add more cash to get a bigger boat. I think others in this thread misread it as he would try to sell the first boat for more than he paid for it.

Regards,
Brad
03-06-2010 12:24 AM
zboss I like the idea of a manufacturer that is still around and I definitely hear about selecting any boat that appears to have been very well maintained.

Do you think that I am out of my mind to try and buy a cheap boat (in good condition) that is 30 years old and expect to recoup what I paid for it? Frankly, I just right-off any fixes or improvements.

So... what ARE the top-tier manufacturers in the 70's? I think I need a shoal keel for sure because the bay can get very shallow in spots.
03-05-2010 04:38 PM
JimB517
1978 Catalina 25

I have a 1978 Catalina 25. I bought it for $5K. I put about $5K into it over the last 4 years. New sails, new outboard, had keel bolts sistered. I sail it about 2000 miles per year and am out most days (up to 175 days/year). I've done cruises and races. I did a single handed 600 mile circumnaviagation of S. CA's Channel Islands. Yes, things have broke. I've fixed them. One really good thing about Catalina is that the factory is still there. You can buy parts, even for a 30 year old boat. Catalina Direct sells everything. There are upgrades like pintles, gudegons, goosenecks, rudders, that are better than original. You can get original factory cushions, pulpits, booms, etc. even for a 1978.

Go for it. My Catalina has been a great old boat, and continues to sail very well. You can get a lot of boat for the money here.
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