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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > How to attach single piece genoa sheets
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Thread: How to attach single piece genoa sheets Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-26-2010 03:11 PM
sailingdog No reason you can not use the jib on the furler unit, provided it has a luff tape to fit the furler foil. George B describes the procedure fairly well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by countrygent5201 View Post
George, your post caused an explosion to go off in my head (I would have said "bell" but the reaction was a lot bigger than that). This post reveals more ignorance about rigging than I'd like to admit, but here goes:

I have roller furling for my genoa. I removed the sail for UV replacement. A brand new jib came with the boat when I bought it last summer. The jib is in a bag in my garage. When I removed the genoa, I assumed I'd be out of commission for a while without a headsail. After reading George's post, it occurred to me that I might be able to use the jib by simply attaching it to the furling drum and raising it with the top part of the furler system (which, of course, is down at this point) and raising it with the same halyard. Am I making a correct assumption?

Another question: I've never raced, but have wondered how a boat with a furler system could change headsails under racing conditions. How's that done?
03-26-2010 12:34 PM
chicory83 FWIW I usually use the run the lazy sheet to the toe rail fairlead, winch it in, and then make the old inboard sheet the new lazy sheet when changing genoa tracks.

I have also seen people run a loop from the lark's head to the clew so that they can use a single sheet with a hanked on headsail. Not my choice, but it works.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
We have 2 ½ sets of jib/genoa sheets. One set for “normal” or windy conditions, one set of “dental floss” and a “changing” sheet, which we use for headsail peals. (No bald headed changes for us!) The changing sheet also gets used when we are on a reaching leg and we want to switch to the toe rail fairlead. Needless to say, bowlines work for us. Because spectra cored line is expensive, we untie and store them below after use. I have an old length of Dacron line that I use to secure the roller furled sail during the week.
03-25-2010 06:37 PM
blt2ski What George said, along with NOT getting your sheet lines crossed too, assuming you are like me, with sheets for all 4 of the HSails I have.

Then at least here in PHRF-NW, you can peel if in a FS fleet, if racing NFS, you can not peel, you need to let the old sail ALL the way down before you raise the new HS. You can put the new HS in the groove, no higher than 5' IIRC ready to hoist when the old sail is on deck.

Marty
03-25-2010 05:17 PM
GeorgeB When a boat is set up for double jib halyards, then you use the port halyard for running up the sail in the port foil groove and starboard to starboard as you don’t want to “cross” the halyards. You want to hoist the new sail in the lee of the old, and use the new sail to cradle the old one coming down to the deck. This makes for a much faster change. It is a real PITA to bring the old one down in the lee of the new as the sail can get hung up on the lifeline stanchions and it is hard for the bow and mast man to gather it into the boat. You got to strategize on when and where you make your peel.
03-25-2010 05:04 PM
Stillraining George...Teachable moment here...

What mater does halyards have on tack sides?
03-25-2010 04:31 PM
GeorgeB Whoops! I guess I should have been more detailed. Depending upon the race (some do not allow peals). We will drop the top part of the furler (Schaefer) and use the gear as a foil only. We hoist it up the foil just prior to the race. How we peel: Run the “changing sheet” from the secondary winch to forward and tie to the new sail’s clew. Untie the lazy sheet and tie it to the new sail’s clew. Hoist the new sail on the leeward side of the old sail. (Depending upon what halyard the first headsail went up on determines which tack to make the change.) Set the halyard. Drop the old sail onto the forepeak. Untie remaining sheet and re-tie it to the new sail, trim the sheet. Ease the changing sheet and untie from new sail. Flake and stow sail on forepeak and stow changing sheet. Whew, makes me tired just writing about it! Truth be told, most of the time we do headsail changes during the runs. Again, instead of furling, we drop the old headsail at the windward mark. If we’re using the Schaefer as a foil on race day, then afterwards, we will drop the sail and run it up using the furler cuz Mrs. B don’t do headsail changes!
03-25-2010 04:11 PM
zz4gta A twin groove foil will allow you to raise one sail before taking down the old one.

I've raced on a boat that had a shackle at the base of the furler which we clipped in the tack and just attached the halyard directly to the head of the sail. Worked well. bypassed the furler all together.
03-25-2010 04:00 PM
countrygent5201 George, your post caused an explosion to go off in my head (I would have said "bell" but the reaction was a lot bigger than that). This post reveals more ignorance about rigging than I'd like to admit, but here goes:

I have roller furling for my genoa. I removed the sail for UV replacement. A brand new jib came with the boat when I bought it last summer. The jib is in a bag in my garage. When I removed the genoa, I assumed I'd be out of commission for a while without a headsail. After reading George's post, it occurred to me that I might be able to use the jib by simply attaching it to the furling drum and raising it with the top part of the furler system (which, of course, is down at this point) and raising it with the same halyard. Am I making a correct assumption?

Another question: I've never raced, but have wondered how a boat with a furler system could change headsails under racing conditions. How's that done?
03-25-2010 03:28 PM
GeorgeB We have 2 ½ sets of jib/genoa sheets. One set for “normal” or windy conditions, one set of “dental floss” and a “changing” sheet, which we use for headsail peals. (No bald headed changes for us!) The changing sheet also gets used when we are on a reaching leg and we want to switch to the toe rail fairlead. Needless to say, bowlines work for us. Because spectra cored line is expensive, we untie and store them below after use. I have an old length of Dacron line that I use to secure the roller furled sail during the week.
03-25-2010 02:22 PM
BarryL
chafe

Hey,

Just to clarify, I see no chafe at the cow hitch. My sheets do get a little fuzzy where they ride on the winch, self tailor, etc. By moving the line each year I minimize that. This will be my 4th year with the same sheets and they are still in great condition (7/16" stayset).

Barry


Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
if chafing is a big concern, slip the sheet through some nylon tubular webbing and tie the lark's head in the webbing covered rope.
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