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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Boat Reviews > Gozzard 31 vs Pacific Seacraft 31?
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Thread: Gozzard 31 vs Pacific Seacraft 31? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-01-2013 01:38 PM
Summit_Elan
Gozzard 31 vs Pacific Seacraft 31?

I have a PSC31 with a cutter rig, i.e. a high cut Yankee and a staysail. This week, in anticipation of really light winds on the Chesapeake, I swapped out the Yankee for a 130 Genoa that the prior owner used to sail the boat as a sloop. I like the look of a cutter rig but didn't have any real comparative experience. I do know now that a high cut Yankee gives poor down wind performance ( see one if my other posts about an asym elsewhere), so before I rush out to buy an asym, I wanted to test out the 130. So of course it was blowing 18-22 kts. I just had a wind gauge installed so I was able to get some good feed back. I was able to get up to 40 degrees off the apparent wind with the 130, with the staysail furled. Then I tried just the staysail, and I could pinch to 32-34 degrees. I dropped boat speed but the upwind difference was palpable. Of course the genoa sheets run outside the shrouds and the staysail sheets run to the coach roof.

Fwiw.

Elan
02-06-2013 08:50 AM
shanedennis Which sails into the wind better? It's one of the boats cannot go into the wind then the other might be faster overall.

Sent from my GT-P3113 using Tapatalk 2
02-05-2013 09:03 PM
SloopJonB
Re: Gozzard 31 vs Pacific Seacraft 31?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
I admit to being a fan of the late Bill Crealock. I don't think he ever designed a slow boat or a bad looking boat.
Not entirely true.

CLIPPER MARINE 32 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com

Also has a PHRF slower than most 20 footers.

Even Bill Garden drew some beasts like the Buccaneer 30.
02-05-2013 07:25 PM
ronbo1
Re: Gozzard 31 vs Pacific Seacraft 31?

Re: Gozzard 31 vs PS 31...

Gozzard is building a re-designed G31 this winter for a repeat customer.
Performance should be improved with a more powerful rig.
Perhaps there is a trend to smaller boats.

Ronbo
04-26-2010 08:51 AM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarros View Post
John,

Thanks for the chance to educate myself. On you mentioning it, I looked up the difference between a double headsail sloop and a true cutter. It appears the main difference is that in a true cutter the mast is placed farther aft, and thus, it's designed to rely on the headsails more, whereas a double headsail sloop is really designed around a single headsail, then has another added for a little extra canvas, better use of or shaping of the pocket, or something else?

Is that even vaugely right? What are the advantages of each of these designs?

BTW, is the PS31 a cutter or a double headsail sloop?

Thanks

-- James
James, I think you understand the distinction between cutter and double-headsail sloop pretty well.

I am not absolutely certain whether the PSC 31 is a true cutter in the strictest sense of that word. However, the term is used a bit more loosely nowadays than it was in the past, and most owners running a forestaysail on these boats consider them "cutter-rigged".

We sail ours (coastal) primarily sloop-rigged. However, we do have a roller furling staysail that we can set "on-the-fly" for to increase sail area when close reaching in light-to-moderate winds.
04-26-2010 02:30 AM
jbarros John,

Thanks for the chance to educate myself. On you mentioning it, I looked up the difference between a double headsail sloop and a true cutter. It appears the main difference is that in a true cutter the mast is placed farther aft, and thus, it's designed to rely on the headsails more, whereas a double headsail sloop is really designed around a single headsail, then has another added for a little extra canvas, better use of or shaping of the pocket, or something else?

Is that even vaugely right? What are the advantages of each of these designs?

BTW, is the PS31 a cutter or a double headsail sloop?

Thanks

-- James
04-23-2010 12:16 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarros View Post
John, thanks, that makes a lot more sense. I couldn't imagine the sail area being that different on the two.

Also, I'm not sure if this should be a new thread, but...

I understand how a staysail could be really beneficial on long offshore passages. An extra knot or two over a few weeks journey, another way to balance the boat with less sail area up, if you want to drop the genoa, etc etc etc, but I know from experience what a pain tacking a cutter rig is.

I believe that the PS 31 comes in either cutter or sloop rig. I've heard of boats that have a "removable"? staysail, which is to say that the staysail stay unclips from a point on the foredeck and attaches somewhere out of the way for near coastal and channel work, effectively leaving you with an easy to tack sloop. Do many boats do this? Does it work without doing horrible things to the structural integrity of mast and deck? Other advantages and disadvantages of this type of design?

Thanks.

-- James
James,

What you describe (releasable inner forestay) is done fairly common on many boats that are rigged for double headsails. Some are true cutters, others are just double-headsail sloops.

Sailing coastaly, with a lot of tacking, the sloop configuration is generally considered an easier sailplan to manage. Off-shore, on long passages, the staysail would not be much of a hindrance at all, and offers some benefits.

As long as the rig is designed to be sound without a fixed inner forestay, there's usually no problem structurally. Our boat can have the inner forestay, or not - it doesn't matter. I would prefer to have it in real heavy going, along with the running backstays. But we've never sailed our boat in conditions where I felt we needed it.
04-23-2010 12:09 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehmanta View Post
John,
Are you sure about the heritage of the Westsail?
See link:
Westsail 32 Review : Bluewaterboats.org
The Westsail is influenced by Thistle
Ehmanta, there's a lot of misinformation circulating about the Westsail 32 design. But even the article in your link says that Bill Crealock modified Atkin's Thistle/Eric design.

I can't cite a definitive source, since my info was conveyed to me verbally. All I can do is relay what Bill Crealock told me, in person. Quote: "The Westsail 32 is not my design. I modified one of Bill Atkin's designs for construction in fiberglass."

Certainly he deserves credit for the work he undertook to make it possible to build the boat in fiberglass. But he was a humble/modest guy, and seemed to be sensitive to the fact that he was being given credit for a design that wasn't originally his.
04-23-2010 11:50 AM
mitiempo As far as sailing a cutter, offshore tacking is not done as often as inshore, so the cutter stay is less of an issue. When it blows a staysail with a high cut foot and a reefed main is a very efficient rig.
04-23-2010 11:48 AM
mitiempo Crealock's redesign basically kept the same hull form of the Atkin design. Later when the deck and interior was redesigned to become the Westsail weight was added not helping much.
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