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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Reefing and Heaving to.
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Thread: Reefing and Heaving to. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-09-2010 05:27 PM
sailjunkie Very good points here. One additional step is to put the rudder over to windward. The boat will want to point into the wind, and the back-winded foresail will counter that. As noted above, there will be some "crabbing" movement, but the boat will be quite stable.
07-08-2010 04:10 PM
F4d3d
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
BTW - I recommend heaving-to from a port tack;this puts you on a starboard tack, making you stand-on to more vessels.
Awesome tip! Thanks!
07-08-2010 04:03 PM
casioqv
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Hmm... I'll have to see which version I have... I thought I had the 2008 3rd edition...that may not be the case then.
Same version I have.
07-08-2010 01:39 AM
sailingdog Hmm... I'll have to see which version I have... I thought I had the 2008 3rd edition...that may not be the case then.
07-08-2010 01:11 AM
casioqv
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I'd point out that the Storm Tactics book really isn't designed for modern sailboats...it wasn't really written with high-aspect bulb keel boats in mind. It also wasn't written with multihulls in mind. While the book, updated last in 2008 for the 3rd edition, is a great resource...saying it is for modern sailboats is not quite right.
??? It specifically addresses the issues of heaving to multihulls and high-aspect bulb keel boats, including specific case studies, testimonials, and techniques for these boats.

While the Pardeys themselves have a more traditional boat, they do yacht deliveries and test these techniques on modern boats.

I can't say from personal experience that a modern boat wouldn't create a slick, but it seems to me that any boat (even a powerboat) would be able to create and remain under a slick if lying at a hove-to angle under a parachute sea anchor.

Also- we're talking here about the C22, not an Open 40.
07-08-2010 01:00 AM
sailingdog I'd point out that the Storm Tactics book really isn't designed for modern sailboats...it wasn't really written with high-aspect bulb keel boats in mind. It also wasn't written with multihulls in mind. While the book, updated last in 2008 for the 3rd edition, is a great resource...saying it is for modern sailboats is not quite right.

I'd point out that much of the information in the book does apply, to a degree, to modern sailboats, a lot of it isn't all that useful. For instance, the "slick" that is created when heaving-to doesn't really happen with a high aspect bulb keeled boat. This makes heaving-to a slightly less useful storm tactic for a modern high-aspect keel boat in storm conditions. This isnt' to say that heaving-to doesn't work on a modern design, but it does lose a lot of its value as a storm survival tactic IMHO.


Quote:
Originally Posted by casioqv View Post
I highly recommend this book on heaving to in modern sailboats:

Storm Tactics Handbook: Modern Methods of Heaving-To for Survival in Extreme Conditions
by Lin Pardey, Larry Pardey

I've found that with a 110 jib on my C22, the backwinded jib overpowers the main, and pushes the bow too far off the wind for proper 45-50 degree angle from the wind. My C22 will heave to better under the main alone, but I don't have a small 90% jib as you do.

It seems like fore-reaching becomes a problem when winds are too strong. If the C22 is fore-reaching, perhaps get a deeper reef installed in your mainsail, and a smaller jib (or no jib).

A parachute sea anchor rigged with a pendant line will also prevent the boat from fore-reaching, and make it possible to heave-to under bare poles for severe weather:

07-07-2010 03:03 PM
casioqv I highly recommend this book on heaving to in modern sailboats:

Storm Tactics Handbook: Modern Methods of Heaving-To for Survival in Extreme Conditions
by Lin Pardey, Larry Pardey

I've found that with a 110 jib on my C22, the backwinded jib overpowers the main, and pushes the bow too far off the wind for proper 45-50 degree angle from the wind. My C22 will heave to better under the main alone, but I don't have a small 90% jib as you do.

It seems like fore-reaching becomes a problem when winds are too strong. If the C22 is fore-reaching, perhaps get a deeper reef installed in your mainsail, and a smaller jib (or no jib).

A parachute sea anchor rigged with a pendant line will also prevent the boat from fore-reaching, and make it possible to heave-to under bare poles for severe weather:

06-30-2010 03:01 PM
foxglove SD commented about forereaching which I tried after reading "Sailing in Slow Motion" by Beth Leonard in the Dec 2005 issue of Cruising World.

She didn't describe forereaching as a type of hove-to. The jib never crossed the wind in her version.

Good article if you can find it.
06-29-2010 12:05 PM
smackdaddy
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
BTW - I recommend heaving-to from a port tack;this puts you on a starboard tack, making you stand-on to more vessels.

Jack
Now THAT'S a great tip! I hadn't thought of that one before. Thanks Jack!

As for the other stuff, I too have been amazed at the effectiveness of reefing - and especially heaving to. We've work on the latter as a MOB technique and have gotten fairly good at it.

Granted, I always reef "late", but it does make for some mellower sailing when I need to squeeze another lime into my D&S.
06-29-2010 12:05 PM
sailingdog Alanr77—

On many boats, the storm trysail can be used alone, since it will often keep the COE very close to the CLR. Storm trysails are tiny. On some boats, you'd need to balance the storm trysail with a storm jib, preferably on an inner forestay or solent stay.
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