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Thread: Reefing and Heaving to. Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-16-2015 01:48 AM
capta
Re: Reefing and Heaving to.

We, as do most who sail the Windward and Leeward Islands, rarely begin a day's sailing without a reef or two in the main. It's a whole lot easier to shake out a reef in lighter air than expected than tucking one in, in heavier weather than expected.
11-09-2015 03:45 PM
T.Bird
Re: Reefing and Heaving to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alanr77 View Post
Anyways, enough about magic. To anyone learning to sail- This stuff really works and it would behoove you to learn it now. Don't wait until you need it but can't do it like me. I am a glutton for punishment. Practice reefing and heaving to when the conditions are manageable. You will thank yourself for it. Its better than the first time you saw color TV.
Sorry to dig up this old thread, but stumbling upon this thread is what convinced me that I needed to get serious about getting familiar with these two things. I got to get out sailing yesterday and had the chance to practice both reefing and heaving to. I came to a similar conclusion. It was awesome!

Thanks alanr77!

Tom
07-09-2010 04:27 PM
sailjunkie Very good points here. One additional step is to put the rudder over to windward. The boat will want to point into the wind, and the back-winded foresail will counter that. As noted above, there will be some "crabbing" movement, but the boat will be quite stable.
07-08-2010 03:10 PM
F4d3d
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
BTW - I recommend heaving-to from a port tack;this puts you on a starboard tack, making you stand-on to more vessels.
Awesome tip! Thanks!
07-08-2010 03:03 PM
casioqv
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Hmm... I'll have to see which version I have... I thought I had the 2008 3rd edition...that may not be the case then.
Same version I have.
07-08-2010 12:39 AM
sailingdog Hmm... I'll have to see which version I have... I thought I had the 2008 3rd edition...that may not be the case then.
07-08-2010 12:11 AM
casioqv
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I'd point out that the Storm Tactics book really isn't designed for modern sailboats...it wasn't really written with high-aspect bulb keel boats in mind. It also wasn't written with multihulls in mind. While the book, updated last in 2008 for the 3rd edition, is a great resource...saying it is for modern sailboats is not quite right.
??? It specifically addresses the issues of heaving to multihulls and high-aspect bulb keel boats, including specific case studies, testimonials, and techniques for these boats.

While the Pardeys themselves have a more traditional boat, they do yacht deliveries and test these techniques on modern boats.

I can't say from personal experience that a modern boat wouldn't create a slick, but it seems to me that any boat (even a powerboat) would be able to create and remain under a slick if lying at a hove-to angle under a parachute sea anchor.

Also- we're talking here about the C22, not an Open 40.
07-08-2010 12:00 AM
sailingdog I'd point out that the Storm Tactics book really isn't designed for modern sailboats...it wasn't really written with high-aspect bulb keel boats in mind. It also wasn't written with multihulls in mind. While the book, updated last in 2008 for the 3rd edition, is a great resource...saying it is for modern sailboats is not quite right.

I'd point out that much of the information in the book does apply, to a degree, to modern sailboats, a lot of it isn't all that useful. For instance, the "slick" that is created when heaving-to doesn't really happen with a high aspect bulb keeled boat. This makes heaving-to a slightly less useful storm tactic for a modern high-aspect keel boat in storm conditions. This isnt' to say that heaving-to doesn't work on a modern design, but it does lose a lot of its value as a storm survival tactic IMHO.


Quote:
Originally Posted by casioqv View Post
I highly recommend this book on heaving to in modern sailboats:

Storm Tactics Handbook: Modern Methods of Heaving-To for Survival in Extreme Conditions
by Lin Pardey, Larry Pardey

I've found that with a 110 jib on my C22, the backwinded jib overpowers the main, and pushes the bow too far off the wind for proper 45-50 degree angle from the wind. My C22 will heave to better under the main alone, but I don't have a small 90% jib as you do.

It seems like fore-reaching becomes a problem when winds are too strong. If the C22 is fore-reaching, perhaps get a deeper reef installed in your mainsail, and a smaller jib (or no jib).

A parachute sea anchor rigged with a pendant line will also prevent the boat from fore-reaching, and make it possible to heave-to under bare poles for severe weather:

07-07-2010 02:03 PM
casioqv I highly recommend this book on heaving to in modern sailboats:

Storm Tactics Handbook: Modern Methods of Heaving-To for Survival in Extreme Conditions
by Lin Pardey, Larry Pardey

I've found that with a 110 jib on my C22, the backwinded jib overpowers the main, and pushes the bow too far off the wind for proper 45-50 degree angle from the wind. My C22 will heave to better under the main alone, but I don't have a small 90% jib as you do.

It seems like fore-reaching becomes a problem when winds are too strong. If the C22 is fore-reaching, perhaps get a deeper reef installed in your mainsail, and a smaller jib (or no jib).

A parachute sea anchor rigged with a pendant line will also prevent the boat from fore-reaching, and make it possible to heave-to under bare poles for severe weather:

06-30-2010 02:01 PM
foxglove SD commented about forereaching which I tried after reading "Sailing in Slow Motion" by Beth Leonard in the Dec 2005 issue of Cruising World.

She didn't describe forereaching as a type of hove-to. The jib never crossed the wind in her version.

Good article if you can find it.
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