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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Being run down when dead in the water
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: Being run down when dead in the water Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-09-2010 06:56 PM
Ulladh The Duck Boat had engine trouble, they shut the motor down, dropped anchor, and called the company to get a tow.

No reports yet if they called a Pan-Pan on 16, but if they did the tug and barge would have been alerted.

On the Delaware you will usualy have about 15 to 20 mins between seeing a barge and being in trouble, assuming you keep a good watch.

Sailing the Delaware will require frequent crossing of the shipping channel. If I don't have wind and current in my favour I will delay a crossing until I am confident it is clear or will have the motor on idle in neutral, and have the VHF on 16 with maximum volumn.

Had a great slalom run nun's to can's Philadelphia Airport to Chester yesterday without any barges, but still kept a good watch with frequent looks over my shoulder and the VHF on 16 at max volumn.

The Duck Boat water tour is all in the shipping channel, I suspect the investigation will center on communication issues.
07-09-2010 05:36 PM
Faster
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailjunkie View Post
You are talking about English Bay, and my reaction to your entire post is "Amen" to that! However, I can live with a sore neck.
Mark - took a drive by Reid Pt Marina last week.. saw your boat - lookin' good!
07-09-2010 05:14 PM
sailjunkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
We routinely have to cross a couple of major shipping channels coming and going from Vancouver BC.. container ships, bulk carriers, tankers transit inbound and outbound regularly at at surprising speed most days.

We know folks who have 'stalled' while crossing (engine trouble, no breeze) and they did call the ship, and in another case put out a "pan pan" and the ship was able to deviate around them. So it's important to keep the information channels open too.

Sometimes I feel like a swivel neck keeping an eye out for potential conflicts during the half hour or so it takes to cross these lanes an right angles..
You are talking about English Bay, and my reaction to your entire post is "Amen" to that! However, I can live with a sore neck.
07-08-2010 01:21 PM
Boasun When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you.
07-08-2010 12:56 PM
Faster We routinely have to cross a couple of major shipping channels coming and going from Vancouver BC.. container ships, bulk carriers, tankers transit inbound and outbound regularly at at surprising speed most days.

We know folks who have 'stalled' while crossing (engine trouble, no breeze) and they did call the ship, and in another case put out a "pan pan" and the ship was able to deviate around them. So it's important to keep the information channels open too.

Sometimes I feel like a swivel neck keeping an eye out for potential conflicts during the half hour or so it takes to cross these lanes an right angles..
07-08-2010 12:50 PM
dabnis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boasun View Post
When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you.
To add a little to this, from an earlier post:

"Just remembered this, many years ago I think I read something to the effect of "smaller vessels shall not impede larger vessels with limited maneuvering capabilities" or something like that. Being enginless with no wind and crossing the shipping lanes may fall into that category? Perhaps JACKDALE can jump in here with the specifics?

Dabnis"
07-08-2010 12:28 PM
Boasun When you have to be in a Navigation channel due to ultra shallow water outside the buoys. Then hug either the Green or Red buoy line and let the ships have the center. Also TALK to the pilots on the ship and let them know that you are there... If they are aware of you the lest likely that they will hit you... Which is one minor detail that is very important to you.
07-08-2010 10:09 AM
dabnis
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
There's a good reason not to sail in the "shipping" channel. In most harbors there are areas of shallower depth that a small sailboat can use, which the larger ships can not. Often there are even designated small craft channels or traffic areas. If you don't have to be in the main shipping channel, why would you sail there???
Sometimes it is the only way to get from one place to another.
Agreed, one should spend as little time crossing them as possible.

Dabnis
07-08-2010 12:48 AM
sailingdog There's a good reason not to sail in the "shipping" channel. In most harbors there are areas of shallower depth that a small sailboat can use, which the larger ships can not. Often there are even designated small craft channels or traffic areas. If you don't have to be in the main shipping channel, why would you sail there???
07-07-2010 07:13 PM
dabnis
Quote:
Originally Posted by dabnis View Post
Although not the exact same situation as in Denise's post, from a previous thread "going engineless":


"ED031,
I agree with TOMMAYS. My experience was many years in and outside of San Francisco Bay, LOTS of commercial traffic. Don't know what your area is like, but if there is much ship and barge traffic they will close on you at an alarming rate. A few times I had them get a lot closer than I wanted by the time I got the motor started and finally got some speed up. The ships can be limited to where they can go. For liability purposes they might try full astern
before they run you down. If you lose your wind with commercial traffic around you can be in great danger.
Dabnis"

It is a sad example of what can happen when you are dead in the water
in a sailboat with no power, and no wind .

Dabnis
Forgot the link:2 Teens Missing, Dozens Rescued After "Duck Boat" Crash In Delaware River - cbs3.com

Dabnis
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