SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > use of toe rail..
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: use of toe rail.. Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
08-15-2010 03:21 PM
BreakingWind2 My genoa blocks are attached to the toe rail so I agree that the rail can take considerable lateral and horizontal forces.

For mooring, I bought stainless steel caribiners to attach the spring lines to. I just leave them hanging from the toe rail and attach the lines just prior to docking. Makes it easy to change their locations depending on the dock cleat locations.
08-15-2010 07:21 AM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweitz View Post
The toe rails are typically very storng and could easily withstand the loads you may impose with a midship mooring line. The issue you may face is the proper form of attachment. You could use a snatch block on the toe rail and lead it to a strong point like a proper size cleat, or a winch. There are cleats available that are designed to go into toe rails, but they seem pretty flimsy to me.
Agreed: Wish I had a camera today.

I was at the dock today and came upon a 40 something boat that has 3/4" headed SS carriage bolts every 5" holding down the toe rail going through the deck to hull joint...Id bet my bottom dollar you could pick that boat up by its to rail if you attached to enough areas no problem as all.
08-13-2010 09:26 PM
donradclife Wichard makes a good but pricey solution to the chafing problem

wichard toe rail pad eyes
08-13-2010 07:43 PM
tweitz The toe rails are typically very storng and could easily withstand the loads you may impose with a midship mooring line. The issue you may face is the proper form of attachment. You could use a snatch block on the toe rail and lead it to a strong point like a proper size cleat, or a winch. There are cleats available that are designed to go into toe rails, but they seem pretty flimsy to me.
08-13-2010 06:44 PM
GreatWhite you can use it for tying the bottom of the netting down, used to keep kids, pets and sails in the boat.
08-13-2010 06:13 PM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bump View Post
Toe rails are used to keep you in the boat. The holes are for drainage and should not bear any strain or pull.
Maybe for teak toe rails, but not true at all for perforated aluminum toe rails that the OP was talking about. These became common in the early days of the IOR rule. Like others have said, they are/were actively used to attach spinnaker sheet and guy turning blocks, barber hauler snatch blocks, a boom preventer, etc... No, you can't lift a boat using them, but there's very little you can do that will do any more than maybe make a ding that turns into a nasty meat hook. If used to attach a preventer, the boom will break long before anything happens to the toe rail. Used to do this all the time on an IOR mini-maxi. The only problem with them is if you have crew hiking, you need to use some foam pipe covering to keep everyone's legs attached to their body.
08-04-2010 12:15 AM
CalebD
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith10 View Post
The only caution with tying a dock line to the toerail is chafing. The edges of the holes are sometimes a little sharp.
I don't think that is the only caution. I'd use my cleats for most dock lines, all if possible. The constant loading and unloading of pressure a dock line can develop in bad weather could help pull your toe rail out or damage the hull/deck joint, if the rope didn't chafe through on the rail first. For a quick tie up then sure, use the toe rail as well if you like.

As Jeff_H and others have suggested these toe rails were intended to be used for attaching working loads in the running rigging of the boat (the sails).
08-03-2010 12:41 PM
Jeff_H Back when the Yamaha was built, punched toerails were intended as mounting points for sheet lead blocks but not usually for the primary genoa or working jib. Typically lead blocks for the spinnaker guys (twings) were lead to snatch blocks on the toerails. Similarly, preventers and 'short sheets' for the jibs were lead to the punched toerail. That was the norm.

The downside is that the aluminum rails (and sometimes the adjacent topsides) get pretty beat up using them with snatchblocks

Now then, upwind, for the most part, on boats that size, genoa sheets were lead to deck mounted tracks and blocks, and then back to the winches.

Jeff
08-03-2010 12:33 PM
Stillraining Mine are teak and are through bolted the deck/hull flange every 4"....My genoa track and cars are mounted on mine...Probably stouter then most of my deck hardware.

Personally I tie mid-ship spring lines to them with out so much a thought ...but would not use them for fore or aft main dock line aplications.
08-03-2010 11:31 AM
msmith10 The only caution with tying a dock line to the toerail is chafing. The edges of the holes are sometimes a little sharp.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:24 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.