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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > mainsheet mysteries revealed?
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-07-2010 09:30 AM
rcoles Fabulous response Garymcg! I am anxious... There are 3 Pretorien on the East coast - and all have their quirks. The best has good gel coat as she is coming from the Lakes, but a "broken bulkhead. She has no lines coming back to the bridgedeck, so this is a virgin install. I certainly would wait a year.
I do tweak with my Gin Tonic though
11-06-2010 11:55 PM
garymcg
Quote:
Originally Posted by puddinlegs View Post
Just want to pass along a very sage piece of advice I got before buying our boat... Before you go changing anything, sail the boat for at least 6 months. A year is even better. Until then, you're only guessing on how you're going to use and handle the boat. For your boat to be, if you're cruising, realistically you'll be using the autopilot a lot, even for tacking, so it really doesn't matter if you can't reach the winches from the wheel. Unless you're going to be racing, so you'll be hoisting sails for the puffs, not the lulls. One thing you'll be very surprised at once you use an AP is how rarely you'll even be behind the wheel. Now for close quarters, sure, things will be different, but again, you'll save yourself a ton of money and a ton of grief by CHANGING NOTHING (other than fixing worn out running rigging, etc...) that doesn't need immediate attention for the first 6 months. After week one, write down what you think your boat improvement priorities are. Do it again every month. By month 6, you'll laugh at you first thought was important in terms of gear and sail handling for single and short handing.
Good luck on closing on your boat!
I agree with Puddinlegs, that's one of the best pieces of advice for a new boat owner I've ever heard.

If you wait six months, you can figure out what type of sailor you are, and that will steer your rigging choices; everything is a compromise. Some sailors will gladly constantly tweak the set of their sails to get that extra quarter knot, even if they're not racing. Others like to set the sails, put on some tunes, and relax. Different strokes for different folks. Figure out where you lie on the compulsive trimmer >> take a nap continuum before you make any changes to your rigging.


I own a Pretorien with a bridgedeck traveller (and end boom, or at least "near end" boom sheeting), and "move traveller" was near the top of our list when we bought the boat 3.5 years ago. Now I wouldn't touch it, the mainsail isn't that large and I can handle it in any conditions without a winch. The Admiral has trouble when the wind pipes up so we may go to 6:1 or one of the combo purchase systems, but as far as I'm concerned simple is best.

The only drawbacks to the bridgedeck traveller are that sometimes you have to move the traveller a few inches to go below, and we can't sail with the dodger-bimini connector in place. The latter is not really an issue because we only use that piece of canvas while at anchor, but the Admiral would like to be able to mount a full enclosure when we eventually go off cruising.
11-06-2010 10:53 PM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcoles View Post
None of these solutions would help me... on an about to be acquired
Rretorien 35. The traveler is in front of the door. Far away from the wheel. Hoe can I redirect the main sheet back without blocking all seating ... ?IMG_6396-20% | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The problem also arises by having the jib sheets winches too far from the wheel. Any idea?
Just want to pass along a very sage piece of advice I got before buying our boat... Before you go changing anything, sail the boat for at least 6 months. A year is even better. Until then, you're only guessing on how you're going to use and handle the boat. If you're cruising, realistically you'll be using the autopilot a lot, even for tacking, so it really doesn't matter if you can't reach the winches from the wheel. Unless you're going to be racing, you'll be hoisting sails for the puffs, not the lulls, so having the traveller in hand won't be as big a deal. Once you use an AP is how rarely you'll even be behind the wheel. For close quarters, sure, things will be different, but again, you'll save yourself a ton of money and a ton of grief by CHANGING NOTHING (other than fixing worn out running rigging, etc...) that doesn't need immediate attention for the first 6 months. After week one, write down what you think your boat improvement priorities are. Do it again every month. By month 6, you'll laugh at you first thought was important in terms of gear and sail handling for single and short handing.
Good luck on closing on your boat!

(tossed in a couple of edits... holy cow, that was pretty illegible!
11-06-2010 10:39 PM
Faster rcoles...

One solution to getting the mainsheet back to you at the helm is known as "German sheeting" or, in the linked harken literature, "Admiral's Cup Sheeting".

Harken Mainsheet Systems

It gets rid of the fiddle block/camcleat at the mainsheet base at the traveler and runs a double ended sheet forward along the boom, from the gooseneck to the side decks, aft down the deck through stoppers (or not) to a pair of (usually seldom used) secondary cockpit winches. If those winches are self tailers you won't need the stoppers unless you also want to use the winches for another purpose...This works best if you can do so without creating a serious tripping hazard going forward on deck.

Our son has fitted this on his Catalina 36 and it's working well for him. Since you're using either of the winches at either end, even when beating the sheet is available to you at the helm regardless of where you're sitting and what tack you're on.

It does involve additional hardware, but at the same time you're able to utilize the power of the winches so reduced tackle may be possible. Reduced speed is a potential problem, but it's still better than a mid boom setup with a winch under the dodger.

After that, run your traveler control lines aft similar to Denise's pic above and you're all set!
11-06-2010 09:59 PM
deniseO30 Rcoles, you can get a traveler that has the sheets coming to the traveler car rather then the ends of the track like mine. Do you see that cam cleat we installed behind the winches? I have yacht braid (very supple ) and toss it around the winch in moderate to light winds, then It's a simple matter to just pop the sheet into the cam cleat. As you can see the traveler lines can go there too even though it's not necessary.
11-06-2010 09:22 PM
rcoles
Short handling a Pretorien 35

None of these solutions would help me... on an about to be acquired
Rretorien 35. The traveler is in front of the door. Far away from the wheel. Hoe can I redirect the main sheet back without blocking all seating ... ?IMG_6396-20% | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The problem also arises by having the jib sheets winches too far from the wheel. Any idea?
09-03-2010 10:47 AM
zz4gta Very true. But you only have to warn someone once.
09-02-2010 08:51 PM
Classic30
Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
Another way to get around buying a nother sheet is to make a pennant that attaches the mainsheet block to the boom. If you have a 1' pennant, you just reduced your mainsheet length by 5' (if you go with a 5:1). Really helps get the spaghetti out of the cockpit.
..and increases the chances of you getting sconned something serious during a quick tack.

You'd have to learn to not only duck when the boom came over, but dodge as well!
09-02-2010 10:19 AM
zz4gta A 6:1 will dump just as fast as another 6:1. It's the same thing people.
I still believe a 5:1 is going to be the best thing for you. Also if you need a new mainsheet (remember you just increased the puchase), just tell your favorite rigger that you want a single braid. There's some really nice stuff out there, and the sailing world should branch out from the standard "lets put 3/8" sta-set on everything" attitude.

If you don't want to change the mainsheet, then splice on another 10 feet or however much you need in the next size smaller line.

Another way to get around buying a nother sheet is to make a pennant that attaches the mainsheet block to the boom. If you have a 1' pennant, you just reduced your mainsheet length by 5' (if you go with a 5:1). Really helps get the spaghetti out of the cockpit.
09-01-2010 11:03 PM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Just curious, how does this 6:1/24:1 dump the main more quickly than a 6:1???
Actually, yes, it works very well and is pretty common on boats like J-35's. The 6:1 works great for gross tune, and the 4:1 fine tune makes it all manageable in higher wind ranges... trav up and down, teak with the fine tune. We have the same on ours... the 6:1 can really load up, but you don't have quite enough to need the extra weight/expense/space for a main sheet winch... it's much faster.
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