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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Need Boat Ladder Suggestions
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Thread: Need Boat Ladder Suggestions Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-05-2010 12:37 PM
LinekinBayCD You are young for that. Thirty operations is crazy. I guess there are more issues than just the hips. So far so good. I have the highly cross linked polyethylene which is different from the polyethylen they had previously been using. From the research I read before my operation and after the highly cross linked polyethylene wears almost as well as the metal on metal hips but does not create the irritaion from the wear paticles as the metal on metal types. There was a front page article in the Wall Street Journal a week or two back about a recall on J&J / Depue metal on metal hips for that same reason. I think mine is a Zimmer My doctor told me it would be good for 25-30 years so we will see. No wear showing at the four year check up. So far everything he has told me has worked out to be true. We'll see. He just did Joe Paterno's this past winter so hopefully he knows what he is talking about. Joe Pa wants it to be good untill he quits coaching in 25 years.
09-03-2010 10:17 PM
Capnblu Well I have had 3 total artificial hips so far. My first was at 22 yrs old. I have had my pelvis operated about 30 times too. So now that it doesn't dislocate daily anymore, I am quite happy. I can still walk and such, but for how long has always been the question. Also you are quite new at 5yrs Line, in another 5 yrs you will probably start noticing the effects of the deterioration of the cross linked polyethylene bearing that will cause bone loss, and loosening of the acetabular cup. It is a real pain in the A$$,I know, but maybe you will be lucky, or have a different component. Not a huge concern for people in their 70's to 80's that don't move as much, but I am only 42. The best news is that there is a new development that will have them insert a metal lattice assembly, and with stem cells, be able to grow new components in place. They are already testing this in animals, and it looks very promising for younger patients that could handle the 4 weeks of complete immobility. Should be available in 10 yrs. I will be ready.
09-03-2010 08:34 PM
LinekinBayCD
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnblu View Post
The hardest part was doing it with 2 artificial hips, that cause me mobility problems.
I'l vote for your build the stairs solution or some type of scaffolding.

On the topic above about the mobility why the problem with the hip replacenment? I had one done 5 years ago and forget that its not the original. Those procedures seem to be getting as common as having a tooth filed. You can pretty much trip over guys at the gym I go to that have had some part replaced.
09-03-2010 05:54 PM
Capnblu I also started from a long way down! I removed every screw and bolt from the entire boat. I removed everything, appliances, sinks, taps, pumps, hoses, rudder, wires, headliner, and every piece of interior wood that had more than 1 screw hole in it. (if it only had 1, I plugged it) that was the line I drew at the time. I removed the bronze ports, and all the acrylic windows and hatches. I removed all the doors, drawers, and anything that could be removed. I pulled the engine and v drive. Steering quadrant and cables. I then stripped the inside of the hull down to bare fiberglass in the bilge, and in all areas under the cabinetry, and behind. Everything from the deck was removed, and all penetrations were overdrilled, and over beveled, and filled with epoxy, and fillers, then redrilled, and beveled, similar to what Mainesail has on his site. All new chainplates, were cut on a waterjet. Every part of every system was disassembled, and repaired to better than new, or thrown away. I made all new stansions, and bases. Every piece of bronze was brought down to 100 grit, then up to 3000, then polished to a mirror. Every piece of stainless was cut down to 60 grit, and brought up to 3000, then polished to a mirror. All interior woodwork was stripped to bare wood, and will begin it's new life at 6 coats of varnish, sprayed on if removed from boat, brushed and tipped with camel hair brush, if inside. All new foam, and material on berths, and seating areas. New battery bank 10 t 105's, new inverter, and charging system. Only original factory wires were maintained, after new heat shrink terminals were crimped on, and tested as new, all others new. New propane system. new hot water system. New bilge pump system. New Espar diesel forced air. 16000 btu and 8000 btu air conditoners. Complete Raymarine suite, autopilot radar wind speed depth, etc. 4 wet spots on deck were removed, recored, and brought back to spec. gelcoat completely removed from deck, and topsides. Hull faired. New teak deck epoxied down, no screws used. All hatches and non bronze door hardware bead blasted, and powdercoated. I am probably missing a few dozen things...
I am very close to finishing, and I have been at it full time for 2 1/2 years. I will complete in november. The hardest part was doing it with 2 artificial hips, that cause me mobility problems. Organization is the key to doing this big of a job. I separate my days into jobs at the boat, and jobs at home. 7 days a week, Christmas day off, wife's, and daughters birthdays off. Limit yourself to 14 hours a day.
09-03-2010 04:47 PM
kjsailingSpring
A Perry Like yours, Capnblu

Capnblu, I like the stairs idea. Probably the best idea since I really don't want to waste time healing after I fall verses working on the boat. My boat isn't far off from your Tayana, as far as its another Bob Perry and came just after his design Tayanas. I love the Tayana's and had it in my mind to buy one for a long time and then really grew to like the Baba's. I bought a 1981 35' Ta Ching Baba. Actually, what I bought was the hull and every single item, from the ballast to the Mast, stripped out of her. It will be a complete refit, with new rigging, epoxy and fiberglass the hull, new plumbing, electric, etc... I'm so excited about her, I have visions of beauty when she's done. Her cabinetry, cockpit and decks are still quite pristine but she was neglected in upgrades and had a rotten mast so I'm starting over.

How did you Tayana refit go? How extensive and how long did it take you? What was the worst/hardest part?

KJ
09-03-2010 02:41 PM
Capnblu I would try really hard to negotiate with my yard to allow a good set of stairs. Since KJ already mentioned a rolling set, I didn't see space or perceived permanence as a problem. My stairs can break down in under half an hour with a cordless screw gun. I used 2 X 12's for the stringers, 2 - 2X 6's for each tread, and 2 sections of brick layer scaffold for the tower. I have the entire boat surrounded by scaffold, and can walk up the stairs and either work around the topsides, or step onto the deck carrying both hands full. I just can't imagine trying a refit going up and down a ladder...

So what type of boat did you buy KJ? What will the scope of your refit involve?
09-03-2010 01:20 PM
sailingdog This only really works if you own the place that you work on the boat at... most people need something that is a bit more portable a solution, rather than something so permanent. It might also work if you have a long-term relationship with the yard you're keeping your boat in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnblu View Post
I have refit my Tayana 42, and I can tell you, ladders of ANY TYPE suck. Build yourself a set of stairs 4' wide, with a landing on top at least 8' X 5'. Put a hand rail up both sides, and make the deck of the landing at the same level as the deck of the boat. Nail asphalt shingles to each step, and onto the platform on top. You will be walking those stairs a million times with heavy crap. build a post on a corner to hook up a come along or rope and pulley system to raise and lower all the things you do not wish to fall all the way down with. You will never regret it if you do.
09-03-2010 12:25 PM
Capnblu I have refit my Tayana 42, and I can tell you, ladders of ANY TYPE suck. Build yourself a set of stairs 4' wide, with a landing on top at least 8' X 5'. Put a hand rail up both sides, and make the deck of the landing at the same level as the deck of the boat. Nail asphalt shingles to each step, and onto the platform on top. You will be walking those stairs a million times with heavy crap. build a post on a corner to hook up a come along or rope and pulley system to raise and lower all the things you do not wish to fall all the way down with. You will never regret it if you do.
09-03-2010 11:46 AM
kjsailingSpring
Keep the great suggestions coming!

I like the Werner ladder idea but what about going up it with 50 pounds of ballast in my arms? I guess I could rig a pully system around a platform and hoist gear and supplies up to the deck via the dingy davit. I'm still not convinced I don't need to shell out for a rolling step ladder. This is the one I'm looking at: Used Warehouse Rolling Ladder 12 Step

Tommays suggestion was very helpful too. I will do that for fiberglassing the hull, sounds perfect!

Thanks guys!
09-03-2010 10:08 AM
Sabreman I extend the ladder to it's full 16' length for painting the exterior of the house and fold it in half (8') for getting to our cathedral ceilings (at home, not on the boat ).

Super versatile ladder. I wouldn't be without it, regardless of whether I had a boat.
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