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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Moisture tester woes
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Thread: Moisture tester woes Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-12-2010 09:51 PM
Maine Sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
I'm trying to send you a private message and the system says your all filled up.

Sorry, apparently I get a lot of PM's. Cleaned a few out should be good now...
09-12-2010 08:53 PM
davidpm They paid 8,500 for the boat and put at least 4,000 into it already. They have ambitions of sailing to Florida from NY and then the Caribbean and ports beyond possibly. It has original standing rigging with at least one bent turnbuckle and shot running rigging and a hank-on jib. It has an original, Yamnar and no built-in shore charging system. They are a very hearty minimalist couple and with the right boat can make what they want to do happen. One is 74 one is 50 and both can move about the deck ok.
They are looking to me for advice.
Before learning of the wet deck problem I recommend new running rigging, a no-brainer.
New standing rigging as spending a few years on a boat with 30 year old rigging seems like a bad idea.
There are lots of systems they have never looked at like the stuffing box which leaks too much and the cutlass bearing.
In short where do they stop? They can't do much themselves.
Just basic stuff and we are looking at another 5,000 at least and they still have a wet deck boat.

I'm thinking of telling them to sail a year or two locally, get some experience then get the trip boat and try not to spend too much money on this boat in the interim. He tied a three strand line to the wire main halyard with a bowline. I expect it will cut through in about 10 hours of sailing.

Given the condition of the deck can I condone the
Caribbean? If he sails in the Hudson river and maybe motors on down to Annapolis how long will the deck survive freeze cycles before it becomes unsafe?












09-12-2010 08:33 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
A calibrated Electrophysics CT-33 detects the level of capacitance that can be established between the 2" plate at the back of the meter and the surface under examination. Among the things that can cause an increase in capacitance reading are proximity to metal (backing plates, copper in bottom paint, aluminum embedded in the core, chain rode in the anchor compartment), surface moisture, as well as moisture in the core.
Thanks for that detailed response for people reading this thread that are not familiar with the meter. In my case however:
1. Metal: Could have been an issue in a couple of places but not the whole boat.
2. Copper: I only tested the topsides
3. Aluminum in the core: Again not likely in the whole boat
4. Chain Road: Not at the chain plates.
5. Surface moisture: I checked for that

So the lack of sponginess is, from the comments above, due to either a very solid laminate or the fact that the sinking was only a few months ago so the core is still adhered though wet.
09-12-2010 07:37 PM
davidpm It just occurred to me that the boat is probably a few hundred lbs heavier that it should be also.
09-12-2010 07:36 PM
davidpm I calibrate the meter every time I use it.
09-12-2010 05:38 PM
eherlihy A calibrated Electrophysics CT-33 detects the level of capacitance that can be established between the 2" plate at the back of the meter and the surface under examination. Among the things that can cause an increase in capacitance reading are proximity to metal (backing plates, copper in bottom paint, aluminum embedded in the core, chain rode in the anchor compartment), surface moisture, as well as moisture in the core.

Tapping with a hammer (phenolic hammer) is used to detect delamination, through a change in the sound of the tap. Without delamination there is a solid "tap" sound, and where there is delamination, there will be more of a "clack."

Moisture in the core can eventually lead to delamination in two ways. First, as the core turns to mush from constant exposure to water (this can take years). And second, in climates that drop below the freezing temperature of the water in the core, as the freeze-thaw expansion and contraction of the water separating the core from the GRP laminate.

Let me try to net this out for you; High readings on the CT-33 meter do not necessarily lead to delamination.

Also, when was the last time that you calibrated the meter?
09-12-2010 03:27 PM
mitiempo If the deck is very wet I don't think holes, however many, will dry it out. A complete recore is probably required.
09-12-2010 02:58 PM
hellosailor David, if it has a wet deck core that has not broken down yet...In theory there should be some way to dry it out and reseal it. Offhand I'd hate to think of checkboarding both sides of the deck with 1/4" holes, sealing up the cabin with heaters in it for a month, and then resealing the (presumably now dry) deck afterwards.

But unless someone has a better way, I'd guess something that extensive might be required to save the boat. Slightly less epxensive than peeling the headliner and recoring the entire deck, perhaps.
09-12-2010 02:25 PM
davidpm Oh no this make more sense than I care to admit. So what do I tell my friend.
The boat sank and absorbed moisture throughout the core. Every winter it will freeze and delaminate a little bit more.

So effectively this boat is effectively ruined as far as reliable structural integrety goes. Coastal sail for a few years until the inevitable delamination makes the whole thing too springy even for that.

This is worse than the normal rot around the chainplates and bow plupit because you can, with a great deal of labor, cut out the glass, replace the wood and reglue the glass. But in this case the damage is anywhere and everywhere. A sunk boat is for all practical purposes a dead boat.

Did I get this right.
09-12-2010 07:30 AM
Maine Sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
An intact fiberglass sandwich should not absorb water should it?
What are you saying?
If the boat sank the sandwich IS and WILL be wet. Any screw or bolt penetration is a source for leak especially from the interior which is and should NEVER be sealed with bedding compound. Put that sandwich under pressure below water and it will absorb moisture quite quickly..
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