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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Heave to, WTH?
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Thread: Heave to, WTH? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-08-2010 08:10 AM
Tempest It probably doesn't need to be mentioned, but heaving-to is a useful tactic in many situations. It's not just a storm tactic. Some folks have mentioned heaving-to while waiting for the sun to come up to enter a harbor.
I use it all the time to stop for lunch if I have room, rather than anchor.
If we get a fish on, I'll heave-to.

In less than storm tactics, I'll always furl the genoa to the point that it doesn't rest on the spreaders or shrouds before I heave-to

It is my preferred method for taking in or shaking out reefs on the mainsail.
especially single-handed. Even with a crew, it's less stressful to simply heave-to to take a reef.

In heavy weather, it would seem logical that, at the point that you decide to heave-to, you already have at least a double reefed main or a storm tri-sail rigged and a storm jib. Unless it is a quick passing squall. In which case, I douse the jib...and employ the use of the engine with a deeply reefed main to keep me headed to wind.

Having the Storm -tri and the storm jib bagged an on deck ready to deploy, and then deploying them sooner rather than later is wise. I remember waiting too long , and watching a crew member get dunked several times up to his waist at the bow in the gulf stream..( at least the water was warm)

I like the tactic, and use it all the time...Never had to use it in a storm, came close only once.
10-08-2010 06:59 AM
Maxboatspeed
I'm in - balance

First - sailingdog, donradcliff, something Anna - all said wrote cool stuff.
I can't remember exactly what the book says (Hvy WX Sailing), never saw the vid.
To me me "heaving to" means this:
ballancing a boat. Storm tactic, ya - if you can ballance it. Every boat and sail configuation is different. Of course, wind spd and seas come into it.
If ya want to learn more about "heavin to" (on your ride)- give it a try.
It's about ballancing a particular boat, and a particular situation.
It'll be a totally different deal if you need to "heave to" to save your arse.

Wx is a thing.
Safe sailing
Max
10-07-2010 05:17 PM
St Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
The fact that you had it rigged and in the bag was wise. I do the same offshore with my staysail on a removable inner forestay. There is no way I want to lug a sail through the cabin and over the deck and try to hank it on AFTER things get bumpy. That's simply too late. It all gets rigged at the dock before we push off. That chore is on the list for next week in preparation for heading East in early November.
Yeah, it seems common sense to me, but most people dont seem to do this.
Have a great trip in November.
10-07-2010 11:01 AM
killarney_sailor
To clarify

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
My impression of the Pardey technique of being hove-to a parachute is that it keeps the boat from drifting OUT or DOWN FROM the 'turbulence slick'; keeps the boat WITHIN the turbulence slick. Therefore NOT to prevent forereaching.
I think it is to stop you from sailing away from the slick. If you are drifting to leeward with no forward motion you will just be creating more slick which is what you want. The problem is that with conventional heaving-to you tend to move forward and leave the slick behind (at least partially).
10-07-2010 12:13 AM
RichH
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
Yes it's primarily a full/long keel technique; although it 'can' be done with a fin keel with trys'l or triple reefed main flying.
10-06-2010 11:28 PM
sailingfool FWIW, the crew in the video needs to fully release the main until the boat stopped, then they could trim it a bit if they wanted to adjust how the boat sits off the wind.

As their jib pushes the bow off, the main pushes it up, if the main is trimmed enough, it'll tack the boat, backed jib or no.
10-06-2010 10:01 AM
legarots
Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Also, what worked well the last time you hove-to may need to be modified for a new situation.
This was an important point, if I remember. What you did to heave-to in 15-20 knots (sail combination, sheets, rudder, etc.), will be very different, for the same boat, when in 40 knots.

Additionally, in really bad conditions, your rudder will break unless you securely tie it off.
10-06-2010 09:06 AM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by St Anna View Post
I tack the storm jib on behind the furler and hoist it on a halyard at the 2nd spreader [where I have backstays]. This sail's luff has an angle of about 60 deg.
The fact that you had it rigged and in the bag was wise. I do the same offshore with my staysail on a removable inner forestay. There is no way I want to lug a sail through the cabin and over the deck and try to hank it on AFTER things get bumpy. That's simply too late. It all gets rigged at the dock before we push off. That chore is on the list for next week in preparation for heading East in early November.
10-06-2010 07:14 AM
St Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
Every boat is different - you just gotta experiment. Often as not, [unless you need a kip or to repair something], its really blowin, so you are reefed down.

3/4 rigs use more main - so it is more of the power. An old IOR, like a UFO34 has a smallish main and a huge genny (its main power).

To 'KISS'- you need the weather helm off the main to round up and the headsail to push the bow away. So you zig zag a little and slide 'downhill' - this creates what they are referring to ' the slick'.

Not every boat can heave to. I can in the Peterson, but prefer to slowly go to windward with only the storm jib up [ but I have not been caught out in anything beyond 65-70kn - so this is just my experiences]

I tack the storm jib on behind the furler and hoist it on a halyard at the 2nd spreader [where I have backstays]. This sail's luff has an angle of about 60 deg.

On the occasion I have needed it, I had its halyard and sheets ready. The sail in its bag with 100mm velcro at the opening. So, I hoisted it, the velcro popped and the sail went up, flogging just a little until the halyard was tight. I have a downhawl as well.

Although it all works well, I am always re-assessing how to do it all better and safer. (Thats where you guys come into the equation - thanks in advance)

{unrelated - but; I only have 2 reefs in the main. The reef points lie about where a normal 2nd and 3rd would lie and I use an outhawl and a downhawl at the mast.}
10-05-2010 09:44 PM
smackdaddy Would the main only heave-to pertain more to a full keeler than a fin keel? I'm really having trouble with this main only concept. The fluid-dynamics equations just aren't adding up for a C27.
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