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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Pulsing kerosene stove
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Thread: Pulsing kerosene stove Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-15-2010 12:08 AM
MARC2012 On shipmate kerosene stoves the manual states this is caused due to lack of air in the manifold.If tank is below stove states release pressure,slightly open oven burner.Fuel should siphon to tank.Repressure & should fix.marc
10-14-2010 12:25 PM
niebur
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Niebur—

I don't see why you think the tank has to be mounted anywhere near the stove. It just needs to be higher than the stove, but does not need to be located anywhere that would lead to a leak pouring kerosene over the stove.

Attaching a fuel line to a gimbaled stove has been done on a lot of boats... and isn't rocket science to anyone but you...
You know, the whole point of the exercise is that the hose contraption does NOT become a contribution to rocket science
10-14-2010 12:15 PM
sailingdog Niebur—

I don't see why you think the tank has to be mounted anywhere near the stove. It just needs to be higher than the stove, but does not need to be located anywhere that would lead to a leak pouring kerosene over the stove.

Attaching a fuel line to a gimbaled stove has been done on a lot of boats... and isn't rocket science to anyone but you...
10-14-2010 11:57 AM
niebur
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
It was a stove. As for the tank, why would you need to gimbal the tank if it was independent of the stove???
Right.

Having the tank separately (and clearly above) the stove, the former connected to the latter by a flexible (oil and of course heat-resistant) hose that will not interfere with the gimbal.

And, of course, in addition the hose must not fail from the constant movement and transform the stove into an instant flamethrower right there in the galley.

Why in the world has nobody before had THAT idea?
10-14-2010 11:30 AM
sailingdog It was a stove. As for the tank, why would you need to gimbal the tank if it was independent of the stove???

Quote:
Originally Posted by niebur View Post
Was that a cooking stove or a heater (like a Diesel stove on a boat)? I can much more easily envision the latter than the former.

Somehow I doubt that a gravity-fed gimballed kerosene stove (with the tank necessarily gimballed well above the burners) will be a huge success for cooking...
10-14-2010 11:12 AM
niebur
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Ernst—

Growing up, I used a gravity-fed kerosene stove at a cabin in NH quite a bit. Don't see much issue with fitting one aboard a boat. You'd need to gimbal it, but that's pretty much the case with all stoves—especially on a monohull.
Was that a cooking stove or a heater (like a Diesel stove on a boat)? I can much more easily envision the latter than the former.

Somehow I doubt that a gravity-fed gimballed kerosene stove (with the tank necessarily gimballed well above the burners) will be a huge success for cooking...
10-14-2010 09:13 AM
sailingdog Ernst—

Growing up, I used a gravity-fed kerosene stove at a cabin in NH quite a bit. Don't see much issue with fitting one aboard a boat. You'd need to gimbal it, but that's pretty much the case with all stoves—especially on a monohull.

Quote:
Originally Posted by niebur View Post
Completely different beasts. Diesel "stove" is pretty much a misnomer. They are really heaters, with some of them having the opportunity to put a kettle on top. They are designed to burn for hours (or days) on end and take correspondingly long to get started. You would not want to cook on a diesel stove except if you are in a cold climate and it is on anyways. Kerosene stoves are just that, cook stoves that are usually on for the time it takes to cook dinner and are ready for that in a minute or two (pre-heating).

OK, admittedly, the situation is slightly more complicated. Force-10 used to make a heater that uses pressurized (vaporizing) kerosene. Unfortunately, now you can only buy it with propane burners.

--Ernst
10-14-2010 08:24 AM
niebur
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
A lot of diesel stoves are gravity fed, so there's really no reason a kerosene stove could not be.
Completely different beasts. Diesel "stove" is pretty much a misnomer. They are really heaters, with some of them having the opportunity to put a kettle on top. They are designed to burn for hours (or days) on end and take correspondingly long to get started. You would not want to cook on a diesel stove except if you are in a cold climate and it is on anyways. Kerosene stoves are just that, cook stoves that are usually on for the time it takes to cook dinner and are ready for that in a minute or two (pre-heating).

OK, admittedly, the situation is slightly more complicated. Force-10 used to make a heater that uses pressurized (vaporizing) kerosene. Unfortunately, now you can only buy it with propane burners.

--Ernst
10-14-2010 07:30 AM
sailingdog A lot of diesel stoves are gravity fed, so there's really no reason a kerosene stove could not be.
10-14-2010 01:25 AM
niebur
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Just curious why you say this, when the OP clearly said:


I am not familiar with that particular model. My point was, since you expressed doubt in a previous posting that the tank could be close to the stove, I wanted to explain that this is by no means an unusual feature, and that there is actually a reason for it. Quite possible that there are stoves, like the OP's apparently, that are different and that would require therefore additional pumping during operation.

But my main point was that I cannot imagine a gravity fed kerosene stove, or one that has a ventilation hole that could become plugged
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