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Go Back   SailNet Community > Welcome to Sailnet > SailNet FAQ > Galley counter-ceramic tiles
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-07-2012 06:15 AM
Mike Banks
Re: Galley counter-ceramic tiles

Has anyone thought of using the water-based epoxy stuff used over concrete floors in commercial kitchens? I had thought of making the top from epoxy saturated plywood. then placing in the sink, then covering the top with two layers of bi axial glass cloth and after it has been epoxy saturated, make the coving with epoxy and phenolic micro balloons and after that too has set--flood the top with the water-based epoxy filler compound--but leave out the pigmented resin flakes (unless you want them in there for some sort of uneven colour effect)

I had thought to cover the plywood sole as well--to use up the rest of the kit.
11-23-2010 10:39 PM
bljones Hello has a good point. Just reface the surface. If you want to get fancy, use stainless. if you want butch, use diamond plate. make a pattern, cut, glue it down with some construction adhesive (or screws and finish washers) and you're good to go.
11-23-2010 10:36 PM
hellosailor Mick-
Consider, if the material you have is like Formica (a thin flexible sheet, like 1/16" actually made of layers of paper embedded in resin) and not Corian (a thick and totally inflexible synthetic stone) then you may be able to just repair the damage--without any screws.

Formica and similar materials are just glued down with a contact adhesive. Traditionally the mustard yellow kind although there are good water-based white ones available now as well. If you can clean out that delaminated area and then apply a contact adhesive to both surfaces, once you set it back down (and clamp or weight it) it should set up perfectly, good as new.

Epoxy or urethane adhesives would also do, but contact cement is way cheaper and designed for this job.

"Tile ?????? There is no way to 'seal' the grout, " Yeah, actually there is. Tiled kitchens have to pass health department and USDA standards all the time. You start by using an "epoxy grout" which is epoxy-fortified similar to the way that resin impregnates fiberglass. And an "unsanded wall grout" rather than a floor grout, which contains sand to provide strength when it is walked on--but won't set as tight.
Then there are surface sealers which also help. Regular countertop cleaning is all it needs after that. But for tile on a boat...Geez, Mick, this isn't gonna wind up on HGTV as a frilly boat show, is it? :-)

$2 for the contact cement, some scraping, a weight overnight, good as new.
11-23-2010 10:22 PM
mitiempo I agree with the others that tiles make a lousy counter top surface. But they can make a nice backsplash. The pic below is a boat I owned years ago. I put the series of 4 tiles in the surface above and behind the sink. The countertops were ash and teak with about 3 coats of clear epoxy followed by 4 coats of Epifanes varnish. It looked good but I wouldn't want to do it again - you have to be careful with everything so you don't mar the surface. On the other hand the counters are more than 15 years old in this picture. Laminate (Formica or Arborite) in a mat finish is probably the best solution and the easiest to care for.
11-23-2010 09:46 PM
bljones having done a couple of tile countertops in my time, i have decided that the next time i do a countertop, I am going to do a concrete top. easier to seal, no nooks and crannies to collect mold and mildew and easier to shape. no wetsaw needed, just form, web, pour, set, and seal.
11-23-2010 07:45 PM
Faster
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
....If you're wanting something cut to fit, have you thought of granite? The people who sell stone benchtops will often have 'small offcuts' that they'd be happy to cut and sell. All you need is a thin veneer ('tile') like they use on the outside of buildings and IMHO that would make for a nicer, more durable, finish than ceramic..
Good idea... not only that, anytime a granite countertop gets damaged in transit they're likely to have undersized irregular pieces they'd love to get rid of.
11-23-2010 06:46 PM
Classic30
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuickMick View Post
good call on the 'lift out.' as for the food prep, i never really use the actual counter surface anyway, but bamboo choppin' block. would your thinking differ if i use 'glazed ceramic' cut to fit, the only grout application being edgework? but heck, some bit of chow always gets away from you (or at least me...lol) and id hate to try to fish it out of a tightly fitted seam...
Nope. Ceramic surfaces are, by nature, porous - so even when glazed, a scratch or nick in the countertyop from something dropping on it will look awful after a month or so.

If you're wanting something cut to fit, have you thought of granite? The people who sell stone benchtops will often have 'small offcuts' that they'd be happy to cut and sell. All you need is a thin veneer ('tile') like they use on the outside of buildings and IMHO that would make for a nicer, more durable, finish than ceramic..
11-23-2010 06:37 PM
QuickMick good call on the 'lift out.' as for the food prep, i never really use the actual counter surface anyway, but bamboo choppin' block. would your thinking differ if i use 'glazed ceramic' cut to fit, the only grout application being edgework? but heck, some bit of chow always gets away from you (or at least me...lol) and id hate to try to fish it out of a tightly fitted seam...

thanks, guess me thinks ill be rethinkin the corian/formica. but heck, maybe i should just sawzall off the whole counter and reset. ill snap some pics and come back to ya for more info.


always appreciated,
yours,
Q
11-23-2010 06:22 PM
RichH Grouted ceramic tiles on a galley workspace .... should be nominated for ***incubation / growth site of wild and strange bacteria/dirt of the year in boats*** award of the year 2010.

Tile ?????? There is no way to 'seal' the grout, .... not latex caulk, not silicone, not 'urethane coatings over the grout, etc. from contamination on 'tiled' food preparation surfaces. Plus, grout is going to be an eternal 'bitsch' to keep keep remotely clean.

Just like 'tiled' drainboards and workcounters, etc. installed in the 1970s in houses ..... Dont use grouted tile as a galley workspace. Corian, formica, cultured/manufactured stone (not 'tile'), thin granite or marble, etc. .... but not 'tile' with grease, stain, and dirt imbedded 'grout'. Yucckkkkkk.
11-23-2010 06:19 PM
Faster I'm personally not a big fan of tile'n'grout countertops - on a boat or at home. Tile makes a nice backsplash for a cabin heater, but for me the uneven surface, grout requiring a real good seal, difficulty keeping clean and mold issues would rule it out. - but that's just me.

I think you're probably right about the interference the tile thickness might have for opening and closing.. could you make them 'lift outs' and pass on the hinges?

'twere it me I'd flatten down the delam and recover with a good formica type material. Chances are the hinge issues would go away too....
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