SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > code zero vs 150 genoa
 Not a Member? 


Thread: code zero vs 150 genoa Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
11-28-2010 07:29 AM
capecodda
sheets, furler, etc

All good questions. When we built this boat, we discussed many of them at length as I was worried about the same issues.

We choose a Schaefer furler. I have 2 furling lines setup at all times. One goes to the jib furler, the other terminates in a figure 8 knot for the Code 0 on the ready. When I hoist the Code 0, part of the exercise is to attach the Code 0 furling line to the code 0 furler.

I leave the sheets on the Code 0 in snake mode in the bag. I lead these aft, and have a second set of blocks for the sheets, so I can leave the jib sheets lead as well. We put a cleat conveniently located near the primaries to store the sheets for the sail not in use.

When both sails are hoisted, it looks a lot like a solent rig, with the 2 sails only inches apart. If you want to tack, you do need to roll up the code 0. Of course you can tack the jib conventionally because it's on the inside.

If you want to jibe the code 0, you can without rolling it up if you lead both the sheets in front (like you might do to make a cruising chute jibe). The sail effectively flags out in front of everything.

All of this depends on the rig allowing you to place the code 0 in front of the jib. A fraction rig makes this easy, but I think you could do it with a removable sprit of some sort, even if your jib was all the way forward. In our case we had the boat builder make an extra long anchor roller, with a place to attach the code 0 forward. There also has to be enough clearance up top, which again a fractional rig makes easy, but maybe a spinnaker halyard would allow for this.

There are other furlers that might be better depending on your preference. Lots of the furlers for this purpose are continuous line furlers (I think Facnor works this way). When we looked at these, we imagined having to go forward to work the continuous furling line, although in retrospect I'm not sure this is actually true. The Schaefer furler is sort of a small conventional drum where the line accumulates when unfurled. It is nice for a cruiser anyway, to be able to roll up the code 0 when the wind comes up without sending anyone forward.

When we built the boat, we decided to build it with the code 0 setup, and wait to see if we wanted a cruising chute in addition. After living with this for 2 seasons, I have not been motivated to add the cruising chute to the inventory. Rolling is easier than socking. It reaches pretty nicely including in quartering situations. Again, we are cruising sailors, and your situation and preferences might be different.
11-27-2010 10:07 PM
mitiempo Jibing would work for the code 0 as long as the sheets are led outside the forestay - just like a cruising chute. Coming about would be a furl unfurl affair though.
11-27-2010 09:34 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by capecodda View Post
I don't know if this will work for you, but the setup we have includes a 110 jib plus a code 0. The jib is on the furler all the time. The code 0 is on a wire luff and has a furler always attached while rolled up in the bag (like a snake). A number of companies make furlers that work this way, furling around the wire luff. In light air we hoist snake in front of the jib (our rig is fractional so there's room), and then unfurl at our leisure. If the wind pipes up, we furl the code 0, unfurl the jib, and keep going. We drop the snake again, at our leisure, mostly back on the hook at the end of the day. =
Can you jibe the boat with the code 0 out or do you furl, jibe then unfurl?
What about sheets for the code 0 are they on deck at all times so you have two sets of sheets out all the time?

What model furler are you using for the code 0?
11-27-2010 07:24 PM
olgriz Sounds like a great set-up…something I'd like to have also. What is the brand of the code 0 furler you use?
11-27-2010 09:47 AM
capecodda
code 0

I don't know if this will work for you, but the setup we have includes a 110 jib plus a code 0. The jib is on the furler all the time. The code 0 is on a wire luff and has a furler always attached while rolled up in the bag (like a snake). A number of companies make furlers that work this way, furling around the wire luff. In light air we hoist snake in front of the jib (our rig is fractional so there's room), and then unfurl at our leisure. If the wind pipes up, we furl the code 0, unfurl the jib, and keep going. We drop the snake again, at our leisure, mostly back on the hook at the end of the day.

I asked the sailmaker if we could just leave the code 0 up. If we wanted to do this, the sailmaker would add a UV protection layer which adds weight. Given how light the sail is, he recommended against this. We designed the sail so that at about 12 knots apparent, it's time to put it away. The good news is, you can sail very well in very light air with this setup.

Again, I don't know if this will work in your situation, but we really enjoy this setup and recommend it.
11-26-2010 02:43 PM
costaricanwannabe
code zero vs 150 genoa

My Cal 39 came with two headsails - a working jib (about 110) and a 150 genoa. The 150 genoa was bought used by the previous owner but it has some problems and I am thinking about replacing it. Some of my friends have suggested a Code Zero. My question is, can I use a Code Zero most of the time, as my primary headsail? In other words, can I just put it on the roller furler and use it (for cruising, not racing) effectively in most conditions? My main cruising ground is the Chesapeake Bay. I imagine using the Code Zero at all times during light to moderate winds, then furling it and using the staysail if the wind really blows hard. Can my existing roller furler handle the Code Zero?

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:35 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.