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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Is the bow thruster an aphrodisiac?
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Thread: Is the bow thruster an aphrodisiac? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-21-2011 02:04 PM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boasun View Post
.....So a bow thruster is nice to have but Learn to do without because you may end up without one.
That is exactly correct. There will be peace on earth when the simple use of a bow thruster does not exact the vengeance that they can't do without it.
01-21-2011 01:42 PM
sailingdog I'd have to agree with Boasun. Learning to handle the boat without the bowthruster is key for when the bowthruster fails... If you've never tried parking the boat without the bowthruster and then suddenly have to do it... I feel very sorry for anyone with their boat near your slip.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boasun View Post
Largest single screw vessel that I've operated with no bow thruster is 65 ft.
The largest twin screw vessel that I've operated with no bow thruster is 182 ft.
Though I've have used bow thrusters, the conclusion is that you should learn how to handle your vessel without the bow thruster before you start using one. That way if you do lose that thruster, your skills will still let you dock the vessel or get away from the pier.

So a bow thruster is nice to have but Learn to do without because you may end up without one.
01-21-2011 01:17 PM
Boasun Largest single screw vessel that I've operated with no bow thruster is 65 ft.
The largest twin screw vessel that I've operated with no bow thruster is 182 ft.
Though I've have used bow thrusters, the conclusion is that you should learn how to handle your vessel without the bow thruster before you start using one. That way if you do lose that thruster, your skills will still let you dock the vessel or get away from the pier.

So a bow thruster is nice to have but Learn to do without because you may end up without one.
01-21-2011 10:53 AM
sawingknots i wish i had a bowthruster,i wish i had an aircon also i wish my p++++ was bigger,you just have to make do with what you got
01-21-2011 10:32 AM
jackdale
Quote:
Originally Posted by christyleigh View Post
Sorry to slip off topic but that's interesting....... because both steering stations on my '99 are always live - no switch. Maybe yours (or the one you were driving) is older ?
2005
01-21-2011 10:11 AM
christyleigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
The first time we took out the Nauticat, we read over the manual, but missed the crucial section on transfer control of the hydraulic steering from the inside station to the cockpit.
Sorry to slip off topic but that's interesting....... because both steering stations on my '99 are always live - no switch. Maybe yours (or the one you were driving) is older ?
01-21-2011 09:29 AM
Bene505 I think Dan and Minne pegged it perfectly.

To what Dan said, captains rejected compasses at first. They didn't want them on their boats.

Minne -- is really is all about the smiles.

Great posts.

Regards,
Brad
01-20-2011 02:05 PM
MJBrown Hmmm I have a modern bow and it doesn't have a mind of it's own at all. It goes where I point it. It's not about hull shape, it's just that bow thrusters are simply a technology who's time has come. Manufacturers have been able to bring the price point down where the common boat buyer can afford it. It's no different than any other advance in technology be it in a boat, car or anything else. For those who think it leads to a less than competant skipper I'd ask, if necessary, would they rather have a critical surgery performed by a Dr with a scapel or modern techniques such as laser or DaVinci? After all the Dr using the laser can't possibly have the same skills as the one with the blade in their hands. Or can they?
01-20-2011 01:23 PM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by OsmundL View Post
......it is generally tricky to introduce new dependencies on technology. As an aid, yes, but if the dependency becomes absolute, not so.
Very good points. I will add, however, that without modern technology, you would never step foot on a commercial airliner. They would crash way too often (like they actually did in the 50s) no matter how good the pilot was at the basics. If pilots took the same general approach as 'no-bowthurster' sailors, we would still be flying paper airplanes.

In the aviation industry, the human is there to backup the technology, not the other way around. The only similarity, is that the human must remain competent, they just aren't looked down on for using the technology first.
01-20-2011 01:14 PM
OsmundL
Designing for technology?

This is probably a point to muse over without ever having consequences, butÖ
It could be that design and bow thrusters go hand in hand? Nobody would argue that canoe shapes, Colin Archers and boats of the 60s to 80s excel at maneuvering in harbor, but they do have the advantage of weight and directional force. If you manage to point that bow at a wharf, you can mostly steer it all the way in.

Modern boats tend to have bows that live a life of their own. The moment you take off the last bit of power the bow wakes up, smells the wind and decides to do a Scottish reel all on its own. It needs a bow thruster.
So, you could say that modern designs necessitate bow thrusters, or in reverse, that bow thrusters permitted new designs that are otherwise not maneuverable?

Iím not judgmental about this Ė although it is generally tricky to introduce new dependencies on technology. As an aid, yes, but if the dependency becomes absolute, not so.
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