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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Are we (North America) buying too much boat ?
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Thread: Are we (North America) buying too much boat ? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-03-2011 12:02 AM
capnorv I'm more comfortable with the seaworthyness of our34', but as stated before, it's hard to fault the accomadation of our 45'. For me, the destination is the reward for the trip,...most of the time. Might as well be comfortable.
02-02-2011 11:53 PM
chrisncate
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
So you have a genset and a large fridge and separate deep freeze, a water-maker and en-suite heads with a stand-up shower in your cabin which has a centre island bed on your 33-footer?

Well that's great man, well done.
Pff, I have ac voltage available on tap via no less than 50 outlets, I have a a full size fridge, a freezer, 4 sinks, 2 full baths, 3 bedrooms, a full size range with a built in microwave above, and a full walk in attic for storage...










...in our townhouse, that we desperately want out of...

To each his own on the water... some really want nothing more than small and simple..and close to nature.



More stuff can mean more hassle for many of us out here...
02-02-2011 11:42 PM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by sck5 View Post
"33 foot prison"

come now. It really is quite comfortable for two. Even so if a pile of money fell from the sky I could imagine getting a bigger boat. But the comforts of modern living are all here as far as I can tell. The key is whether there are enough comforts to get my wife to come with me since she is more comfortable than any of the other crap I have on board.
So you have a genset and a large fridge and separate deep freeze, a water-maker and en-suite heads with a stand-up shower in your cabin which has a centre island bed on your 33-footer?

Well that's great man, well done.
02-02-2011 01:57 PM
sck5 "33 foot prison"

come now. It really is quite comfortable for two. Even so if a pile of money fell from the sky I could imagine getting a bigger boat. But the comforts of modern living are all here as far as I can tell. The key is whether there are enough comforts to get my wife to come with me since she is more comfortable than any of the other crap I have on board.
02-01-2011 10:56 PM
Omatako It's the old story about horses for courses.

My choice of 44ft had more to do with accommodation than anything else. Of course I also wanted a strong stable boat that isn't a mission to handle and I think I have that.

What is of significant importance to us is that when we're cruising we are on anchor 70% of the time and sailing 30% of the time. When I am on anchor I don't want to live like a refugee. I want to live as closely to what I do ashore along with the comforts of modern living.

So if I can have strength and stability, ease of handling and safety in addition to a comfortable home, why would I go for a 33ft prison into which one has to shoe-horn an extra battery? It's a no-brainer for me.
02-01-2011 04:38 PM
sck5 Having just sailed from the Chesapeake to St. Lucia in a 33 foot boat, I have no doubt it can be done. But whoever wrote above that it might be easier to sail a small boat in a rally - I dont think so. Even if you are in a large rally you are still on your own and wont see another boat for many days at a time. And in the recent Caribbean 1500 it wasnt the smallest boat (us) that got in trouble, but one of the larger ones. Even that one had an intact hull after hitting a reef.
02-01-2011 03:19 PM
BubbleheadMd I'd take a properly outfitted Albin Vega in a minute.
02-01-2011 02:06 PM
PCP
Quote:
Originally Posted by YeahJohn View Post
How many modern production boats have been demolished at sea? I would say it normally is the captain and not the boat that leads to rescue and/or disaster on the open sea...
Generally boats that are left alone after the crew have been "rescued" appeared safe and sound, many thousands of miles away. I can remember several recent cases on the ARC were boats were abandonned with rudder problems, just for them to make the rest of the voyage alone and safely
02-01-2011 01:11 PM
YeahJohn How many modern production boats have been demolished at sea? I would say it normally is the captain and not the boat that leads to rescue and/or disaster on the open sea. Boat cost for me is not even a big concern when you start looking at the cost of needed safety and backup gear on your boat. Family friends of mine cruise for years on end, it is always surprising to hear their stories about the boats they see taking on the pacific. Everyone negotiates risk differently. Interesting site to look at Famous Small Boats
02-01-2011 12:03 PM
CaptainForce In the days of Eric Hiscock's voyaging most ocean passages were made in 30 to 35 foot sailboats. Now, the average is closer to 40 to 45 feet, not because they are safer, but largely because of the advancement in labor saving devices that allow easier sailhandling of a larger boat. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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