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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Advice needed
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-07-2011 06:24 PM
Johnqboater Thank you very much QuickMick. That's an interesting rule about the retirement fund but indont actually have one.

Ive finally found an available liveaboard slip but I was told the boat would have to be at least 35 feet. Now I'm really annoyed. Of course I would want a larger boat but that will price me out of the market unless someone rents to me or does owner financing.

Maybe I'll just have to rent an apartment.
02-07-2011 02:55 PM
QuickMick
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnqboater View Post
. Mark's idea sounds like dream come true, being able to take care of a boat for an owner that doesn't show up.

Someone just emailed me about a 34 Coronado but I can't find any interior pictures of what those boats typically look like. Does anyone have an opinion about them. Doable liveaboard or cramped?

I make no claims to know what I'm doing but I grew up next to the water and always wanted to try this. Moving from my 2000 sq ft home to a boat will be a change but I'm looking foreword to simplifying my surrounds and being able to enjoy the solitude of the bay again.
My cousin has his captain's lic. and has a pretty sweet deal where he gets to liveaboard in exchange for taking the owner out--when the owner isnt around they've worked out a deal where he charters the boat for the owner and the have some % split. but, you would need a captains lic....

here is the layout of the coronado, then second link pics.

CORONADO 34 Sailboat details on sailboatdata.com

1969 coronado 34' sailboat for sale in California

my 30' is plenty spacious for me and the occasional guest, though i do have a conference room at my office where i can put stuff, but heck, i never use any of it. lol. you might also want to check out local marinas that do brokerage, as sometimes they have deals on boats...
dunno what your budget looks like. if it is going to be your residence (and has the facilities of home) you can take a withdrawl from your retirement account w/o the early penalty... though i am no accountant...

good luck
02-07-2011 02:01 PM
Johnqboater Thanks for all the suggestions on where to look. Mark's idea sounds like dream come true, being able to take care of a boat for an owner that doesn't show up. I guess it doesn't hurt to try, and I just might.

Lots of info on the south bay docks, thank you so much. The thought of having my keel stuck in the mud isn't the best. Doesn't the mud stink really bad? When the water recedes in Alameda, Emeryville, and Berkeley I've always wondered how folks can live around that smell. I think it's rotting vegetation and dead sea creatures. I hope!

Someone just emailed me about a 34 Coronado but I can't find any interior pictures of what those boats typically look like. Does anyone have an opinion about them. Doable liveaboard or cramped?

I make no claims to know what I'm doing but I grew up next to the water and always wanted to try this. Moving from my 2000 sq ft home to a boat will be a change but I'm looking foreword to simplifying my surrounds and being able to enjoy the solitude of the bay again.
02-04-2011 12:02 PM
mikehradecky
Quote:
Originally Posted by vega1860 View Post
We are in the South Bay now, have talked to Giorgio at Pete's Harbor, Ian at Bair Island, the Redwood City Harbor Master, Paul at Docktown and Mark at Westpoint. Only Docktown admitted to having slips for permanent live aboards. We were able to secure moorage only because we are bona fide transients. Westpoint is adding slips right now and, as a result will have a few more live aboard moorings available soon but this is a very expensive, brand new marina - first class in every way and worth the price IMO - but pricey. Mark Sanford, the Harbor Master is very choosy about whom he lets in and the rules are strict. Westpoint is the polar opposite of Docktown. More like a huge Yacht Club. When we tell people where we are moored they are astonished and usually ask how we got in here. Mark turns a lot of people away.

Docktown, on the other hand, has a certain...charm; if you do not mind the trailer park and the work-furlough program and sherrif's station next door; and of course having your keel in the mud except at high tide. I have to say, though, that the folks at Docktown seem a friendly bunch. They have their own, very egalitarian, yacht club and Paul, the Harbor Master seems a nice sort. When I spoke with him a few weeks ago they had LA slips available.
If it is not too far away from where you will be working, you might want to check Marina Bay in Richmond. There are several liveaboards there. I know, we have a slip for our boat there and there are about 5 on our finger.
02-04-2011 11:56 AM
vega1860
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul323 View Post
Latitude 38 is the best place to start. There are fewer and fewer livaboard marinas in the bay, and with the housing prices the way they are a lot of demand. Sausalito used to have quite a few, but many were cleared out.

Call Around - in the South Bay Redwood City have a limited number of slips available, as does Pete's Harbor. Most of the harbor masters seem to have time to chat, and may give you some ideas.
We are in the South Bay now, have talked to Giorgio at Pete's Harbor, Ian at Bair Island, the Redwood City Harbor Master, Paul at Docktown and Mark at Westpoint. Only Docktown admitted to having slips for permanent live aboards. We were able to secure moorage only because we are bona fide transients. Westpoint is adding slips right now and, as a result will have a few more live aboard moorings available soon but this is a very expensive, brand new marina - first class in every way and worth the price IMO - but pricey. Mark Sanford, the Harbor Master is very choosy about whom he lets in and the rules are strict. Westpoint is the polar opposite of Docktown. More like a huge Yacht Club. When we tell people where we are moored they are astonished and usually ask how we got in here. Mark turns a lot of people away.

Docktown, on the other hand, has a certain...charm; if you do not mind the trailer park and the work-furlough program and sherrif's station next door; and of course having your keel in the mud except at high tide. I have to say, though, that the folks at Docktown seem a friendly bunch. They have their own, very egalitarian, yacht club and Paul, the Harbor Master seems a nice sort. When I spoke with him a few weeks ago they had LA slips available.
02-03-2011 10:32 PM
paul323 Latitude 38 is the best place to start. There are fewer and fewer livaboard marinas in the bay, and with the housing prices the way they are a lot of demand. Sausalito used to have quite a few, but many were cleared out.

Call Around - in the South Bay Redwood City have a limited number of slips available, as does Pete's Harbor. Most of the harbor masters seem to have time to chat, and may give you some ideas.
02-03-2011 10:28 PM
MarkN I do want to offer a different position on this - many boat owners who rarely use their boats do consider opportunities to have someone stay aboard to maintain the boat. Some even allow this for free. I can't tell you how many times through the years I've encountered this -

Of course marinas may not have space for another person living aboard, but you get the boat and the slip without having to buy anything at all. Until recently, a fellow nearby had lived on a boat for 4 or 5 years free, maintaining the boat, and had never seen the owner except for the very first day he moved aboard.

It's amazing what you can find if you post an ad on the local boards, the local cork board, etc. Opportunities really are out there.

Mark Nicholas
Living Aboard | The Essentials of Living Aboard a Boat by Mark Nicholas | Living Aboard.net
02-03-2011 03:51 PM
Johnqboater Thanks for the Lattitude 38 suggestion, it seems like most of their boats are priced higher than craigslist. I will check out Docktown, I can always move in and keep looking. Maybe I'll take the suggestion to buy boat but it would have to be owner financed, I'm sure that's a joy to find as well.
02-03-2011 03:36 PM
vega1860
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Most people don't rent boats as liveaboards. Doing so would require them to have commercial insurance, which is far more expensive than non-commercial insurance. Also, it would be far more profitable and cause less wear/tear on the boat to charter it than have someone liveaboard it.

Almost all liveaboards own the boat they live on. If you're not looking to buy a boat, you're probably not going to have much chance of living aboard one.
I dropped in on this thread because we are in the South Bay now. Our experience has been that it is difficult to find a live aboard berth even if you DO own your boat. While looking for a slip I ran into other folks in the same situation. In fact, every marina I went to but 1 stated flatly "No live aboard slips available" That one was Docktown.

Of course, we have found that there is always a move
02-03-2011 03:25 PM
mikehradecky
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnqboater View Post
That makes good sense but I remember seeing lots of them only a year ago so I was wondering if I was just looking in the wrong place. It seems like the Sausalito area has the largest community of liveaboards/houseboats but I'm not seeing many ads. As far as insurance goes maybe they just don't report it that way (I'm only speculating).
You might want to check Latitude 38.
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