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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Running Rigging Questions
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Thread: Running Rigging Questions Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-05-2011 05:33 PM
sailingdog And you can see what kind of damage that would do to an all line halyard... some sharp edges there...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailingWebGuy View Post
Here's a little pic of the damage that wire halyards can do.
02-05-2011 02:21 PM
Sabreman I've replaced all the running rigging on my Sabre 28 and now on the 38. I've used Sta-SetX on both for halyards but really dislike the line because it's very difficult to splice and coils horribly. There are better alternatives such as those listed by other posters. Another alternative is Sampson XLS. I do disagree with the poster that said that Sta-SetX is hard on rhe hands. I think that it's comparable with any other line. Anyway, for halyards, you really aren't handling them that much. Just my opinion.

One thing mot mentioned is doing your own splicing. In short, if you don't know how, now is the time to learn. It is not hard (even Sta-SetX), saves you a bucket of cash (what WM charges is criminal), and you have the confidence that's it's done right. I learned 3 strand splicing as a 14 year old in a boatyard and have done my own splices ever since. Do it, you'll be glad that you did.
02-05-2011 09:53 AM
SailingWebGuy
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
If you're converting from wire/rope to all rope halyards, then you REALLY need to inspect the halyard sheaves and exit slots for damage that could chafe or damage the new halyards. Wire halyards can often damage the exit slots and sheaves, but will not be easily affected by the damage they've caused because wire rope is much more chafe/damage resistant.

I doubt the sheaves can take 3/8" line....but you'd have to measure them yourself. For the halyards, you could probably get away with 5/16" spectra-core line, which is actually much stronger than 3/8" StaSet, 7500 lbs. vs 4400 lbs. 5/16" line may fit, but again, you really need to inspect and measure the masthead sheaves. Also, you want to check the sheave groove profile. A v-shaped one is designed for wire, and will cause the line to wear faster. It might be a good idea to replace the sheaves at this time, given their age and that a u-shaped groove profile would be better for all line halyards.
Here's a little pic of the damage that wire halyards can do.
02-04-2011 08:45 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul323 View Post
Don't mean to hijack - but it *is* closely related - my main and jib halyard are wire/rope, and after 30 years are getting tired. 2011 project: replace them! I haven't measured the sheaves at the masthead, but I am guessing 3/8" (Pearson 323, ~200sq ft main, 45' mast above DWL). So Spectra/XLE/sta-set/??

Defender have pre-made halyards, 90', XLE for $90; Spectra cored for $230ish. I also like the look of Cajun (thanks Dog). Any advice?
If you're converting from wire/rope to all rope halyards, then you REALLY need to inspect the halyard sheaves and exit slots for damage that could chafe or damage the new halyards. Wire halyards can often damage the exit slots and sheaves, but will not be easily affected by the damage they've caused because wire rope is much more chafe/damage resistant.

I doubt the sheaves can take 3/8" line....but you'd have to measure them yourself. For the halyards, you could probably get away with 5/16" spectra-core line, which is actually much stronger than 3/8" StaSet, 7500 lbs. vs 4400 lbs. 5/16" line may fit, but again, you really need to inspect and measure the masthead sheaves. Also, you want to check the sheave groove profile. A v-shaped one is designed for wire, and will cause the line to wear faster. It might be a good idea to replace the sheaves at this time, given their age and that a u-shaped groove profile would be better for all line halyards.
02-04-2011 08:23 PM
olson34 I found that 5/16" T-900 would hold in my original clutches. At 7K# strength there was no need to go larger, and that ID ran comfortably thru the mast head sheaves whereas some 3/8" that I tried was a little too snug.
So do not shy away from 5/16.

L
02-04-2011 08:00 PM
paul323 Don't mean to hijack - but it *is* closely related - my main and jib halyard are wire/rope, and after 30 years are getting tired. 2011 project: replace them! I haven't measured the sheaves at the masthead, but I am guessing 3/8" (Pearson 323, ~200sq ft main, 45' mast above DWL). So Spectra/XLE/sta-set/??

Defender have pre-made halyards, 90', XLE for $90; Spectra cored for $230ish. I also like the look of Cajun (thanks Dog). Any advice?
02-04-2011 07:35 PM
sailingdog Just remember to size the halyards and sheets to FIT THE EQUIPMENT on your boat. Most line clutches, especially Lewmars, have a limited size range they can handle. The same is true of self-tailing winches, deck organizers, sheaves and turning blocks.
02-04-2011 06:35 PM
J36ZT I think you'll find it isn't that easy to keep switching out halyards. And, I doubt you'll notice that much of a performance difference unless you're putting up "racing" sails. So, one set of halyards should be all you need.

Sta-Set X doesn't have the "slick" feeling that Sta-Set (and T900) has. It'll tear your hands to shreds unless you wear gloves. For a halyard, it'll work fine and is an upgrade from Sta-Set. I have T900 halyards...unless you really need "low stretch" and/or you really like the "slick" feeling...a bit of an over-kill (even on a J/36).

As for sheets, regular Sta-Set is likely your best bet. The computer models probably say you could go as small as 3/8", but that's really too small for most people to easily grip. Size sheets so they fit your winches/gear as well as your hands.

Just my thoughts,

Skipper
J/36 "Zero Tolerance"
02-04-2011 05:46 PM
Freddyman I've had the same halyards on the boat for the last twenty years. They are Sta-Set solid green. They are rather faded but still serviceable.
High tech lines seem like a waste of money unless, as mentioned, you are racing.
02-04-2011 02:32 PM
sailingdog One advantage of the newer spectra/dyneema cored lines for halyards is that they give you a reserve of additional strength without going up in line diameter or weight. This allows for some wear that a standard double braid may not be able to withstand without requiring replacement. 3/8" double braid like StaSet has a BL of 4400 lbs, where a 3/8" spectra core line like that from Cajun Trading has a BL of 9800 lbs. or over twice that of the StaSet, and most of the strength is in the core of the line.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
Use something that is strong enough and easy on the hands.

All the high tech lines like Dyneema and Spectra are fantastic materials but they have a place - on high performance boats. If you are racing and worry about your boat speed in tenths of a knot, then they're probably justifiable.

Really, think about all the applications and whether you will notice a difference using them on your boat and weigh that up against the cost.

I know that my boat will not be equipped with these lines. SD's table from Cajun look like the right stuff for me.
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