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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > How can I stop my boat from sinking?
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Thread: How can I stop my boat from sinking? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-13-2011 10:16 AM
Exiles Thank you for all the advice! It is greatly appreciated!
02-10-2011 08:16 PM
GaryHLucas Etap
02-09-2011 03:37 PM
jackdale At the risk of reviving this thread

Exiles - where do you plan on clearing customs and immigration? Or are you planning on a non-stop voyage.
02-08-2011 01:49 AM
centaursailor
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
JonE...+1000.

Exiles, I'll tell you straight up...I've kept my distance from this and the "How many tools" (or whatever) thread. I've seen them here and on SA - and I've taken a quick look at the blog that you're pimping (it's okay but not that great).

I obviously have no problem with a big freakin' sail. And there's no doubt that the NWP is big. HUGE. But this whole thing feels like a "stunt" in search of an audience/sponsors. It's a tad ridiculous.

The problem is that with questions and aspirations like the ones you're setting forth in these forums, it's all far more deserving of a facepalm than a sponsor.

Like JonE says, commit to the thing. Go old school. Keep it quiet, leave the EPIRB at home, get it done, then write your book. I'll buy it. I swear.

Otherwise, take your Chinese diesel outboard down south, go cheap and write a blog about how to patch dinghy holes in St. Thomas. Your chances of survival and reality are much, much higher.
At last, someone with a bit of cop-on.
02-07-2011 10:14 PM
smackdaddy JonE...+1000.

Exiles, I'll tell you straight up...I've kept my distance from this and the "How many tools" (or whatever) thread. I've seen them here and on SA - and I've taken a quick look at the blog that you're pimping (it's okay but not that great).

I obviously have no problem with a big freakin' sail. And there's no doubt that the NWP is big. HUGE. But this whole thing feels like a "stunt" in search of an audience/sponsors. It's a tad ridiculous.

The problem is that with questions and aspirations like the ones you're setting forth in these forums, it's all far more deserving of a facepalm than a sponsor.

Like JonE says, commit to the thing. Go old school. Keep it quiet, leave the EPIRB at home, get it done, then write your book. I'll buy it. I swear.

Otherwise, take your Chinese diesel outboard down south, go cheap and write a blog about how to patch dinghy holes in St. Thomas. Your chances of survival and reality are much, much higher.
02-07-2011 08:34 PM
eherlihy Jon - Well said!
02-07-2011 06:13 PM
JonEisberg As others have suggested, avoid putting a hole in the boat to begin with…

One thing I’d suggest, not just for ice, but for anyone venturing offshore, is to configure a custom fitted collision mat from a very tough fabric such as Stamoid, that will cover the entire bow/forward third of your hull to 18” or so above the waterline, pre-rigged so that it could be put in place in a matter or minutes… that MIGHT give you a bit of breathing room, to begin effecting a repair…

A great amount of luck will likely determine the outcome of your intended voyage… The greatest risk you will face, by far, is getting caught by moving pack ice… If you were in a steel boat, you could have a prayer in such a situation… A fiberglass boat, however, you’re likely to be crushed like an eggshell, there’s good reason why most people would not consider attempting the NW Passage in a boat such as yours…

Frankly, I don’t see how you will be able to carry the amount of fuel required, not to mention the stores should you not make it through and be required to winter over… One of the main problems with going with a small boat so heavily-laden, she will be unlikely to “pop up” above the surrounding ice in a crushing scenario, unless you start tossing your supplies onto the ice… Not good…

Someone suggested an extensive shakedown of a season in Greenland, that’s excellent advice… Given your location, a summer in Svalbard could afford some hints as to what you might be up against, but I doubt you want to hear that…

Frankly, I think attempting such a voyage in a fiberglass boat, with an engine about which you “are becoming increasingly concerned”, is incredibly foolhardy… Probably just me, when I think of voyaging “on a shoestring”, I think of places like the Bahamas, Mexico, and so forth… The Northwest Passage? Well, not so much…

But, since you are budget conscious, I’d suggest you go the route of two of the most exemplary sailors I have ever had the pleasure to meet, and go without an EPIRB… Show the commitment of Tim and Pauline Carr, when they decided to venture into the Antarctic Convergence and South Georgia aboard CURLEW, they fully realized the magnitude of their choice to sail there, and the inherent unfairness of expecting any sort of rescue, the severity of the jeopardy they might be placing upon any potential rescuers… Why not demonstrate a similar appreciation of the magnitude of the risk you are taking, and prepare yourselves – to use Blondie Hasler’s famous words regarding voyaging without a radio – “to drown like a gentleman”…

Frankly, I think your plan betrays a profound ignorance of the sort of things you might encounter on such a trip… Not to say it can’t be done, of course – with the right amount of luck, no doubt it could be… I haven’t been that far north, but I have made it pretty far south, and it’s not the sort of place you want to have to depend on LUCK in order to survive…

02-04-2011 04:06 PM
svs3
Quote:
Love your signature btw...big fan of Robert.
Yeah Bob was a great writer.

Quote:
Wise advice, but I think that goes against the idea of doing this on a shoe-string budget.
It is possible to be penny wise and pound foolish, as they say.

Of course I said that with no idea of the OP's experience is in high latitude sailing.
02-04-2011 01:24 PM
ottos Then there's these guys who did it on a Hobie 18...over 3 years.

One of the greatest sailing adventures of the past 20 years was the conquest of the Northwest Passage, powered by sail, human muscle, and determination. In 100 days, over three summers (1986-88), Canadians Jeff MacInnis and Mike Beedell accomplished the first wind-powered crossing of the Northwest Passage.

Sorry that it doesn't directly address the OP's question, but that story just amazes me.
02-04-2011 10:26 AM
HUGOSALT [quote=svs3;694349]"If it was me doing this trip I would think very hard about spending a season sailing Greenland and as far north on northeastern coast of Canada I could get before trying the NWP. "

Believe it was Amundsen, first to cross NWP in early 1900's...sailed north and at beginning of passage stopped
and spent a year living/learning with natives (much to his crews horror) before he continued on successfully.
Took 2-3 years total.
Last year (sept?) New Zealander did NWP in 2 weeks!
**disclaimer...previous success no guarentee
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