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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Slip preference?
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Thread: Slip preference? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-03-2011 06:46 PM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Well, the problem I have with the marina charging the contractor a fee is that the marina is already being paid for that yard space, since the boat owner is paying for the space. Their charging a fee to the contractor is essentially double dipping as far as I am concerned.

If the marina wants to offer services, then they should offer them at a competitive price with comparable quality. The reason people don't use a marina's services is usually either that they're too expensive compared to their competitors or the work is sub-par compared to their competitors or both.
Don't get me started on bad marina technicians. I've had more than my fair share of nightmares. I would be happy to find one that doesn't simply lie about how much time it takes to complete work. At the end of last season, I was charged 3 hrs of labor to pour 5 gallons of antifreeze down the main engine strainer. Nothing more to the job.... go onboard, open the panel, screw top of strainer off, pour in AF as engine is started, shut engine off. I was just charged 12 hrs of labor by the same yard to replace a cutlass bearing and clean a max prop.

That said, I don't think too many marinas can survive on slip/mooring fees alone. Therefore, if they don't get additional work, those fees would have to increase.

If there were one reliable, honest and friendly boat yard, they could charge whatever they like for an hourly wage and boats would be lined up down the entire bay to go there.
03-01-2011 10:36 PM
sailingdog Well, the problem I have with the marina charging the contractor a fee is that the marina is already being paid for that yard space, since the boat owner is paying for the space. Their charging a fee to the contractor is essentially double dipping as far as I am concerned.

If the marina wants to offer services, then they should offer them at a competitive price with comparable quality. The reason people don't use a marina's services is usually either that they're too expensive compared to their competitors or the work is sub-par compared to their competitors or both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Mark ups are the norm in my experience, glad to hear you found an exception. I don't like them, but I sort of understand that the marina is paying the expense of having a waterfront workshop that the guy who shows up with a van doesn't have to incur. Most marinas rely upon revenue from services other than slip fees to pay for the joint.

Can't imagine how they could keep you from working on your own boat in the slip, but I have experienced restrictions in several marinas over sanding or painting that causes environ issues. Thanks for the feedback.
03-01-2011 09:10 PM
Minnewaska Mark ups are the norm in my experience, glad to hear you found an exception. I don't like them, but I sort of understand that the marina is paying the expense of having a waterfront workshop that the guy who shows up with a van doesn't have to incur. Most marinas rely upon revenue from services other than slip fees to pay for the joint.

Can't imagine how they could keep you from working on your own boat in the slip, but I have experienced restrictions in several marinas over sanding or painting that causes environ issues. Thanks for the feedback.
03-01-2011 07:44 PM
eherlihy
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
If you bring an external contractor in to work on your boat, they charge the guy for the "privilege" to work on their property, which raises the amount he has to charge you. IIRC, you generally can't do almost any work on your own boat at most of them. The list goes on...

At my marina, if you want to bring in an external contractor to do work on your boat, there's no fee or surcharge, and the only requirements the marina has is that they have proof of insurance and that they clean up after themselves.

If you want to do the work yourself on the boat, my marina is pretty good about getting you setup in a space where you can work uninterrupted, and if you have a slip or a mooring with them, they don't charge you outrageous yard fees to keep your boat on the hard while doing the work.
I KNOW that they charge contractors to enter their yard. I got an estimate for having my boat soda blasted, and the guy said that he had to add an additional ~$300 to cover his costs of working in a Brewer yard. IIRC it was ~$1700 for them to soda blast a 35' boat in a Brewer yard.

However, Brewer will allow you to work on your own boat, and they'll gladly pick up on a project that the owner has gotten over his head on.

They really squeeze the boats in next to each other while on the hard though.
I do not have a boat in front or behind me in my current yard. I can drive right up to my boat. At the Brewer yard the boats are butted right up against each other, at least 3 deep. I would hate to think of the consequences of a fire...
03-01-2011 04:34 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
SD, something came up today that made me think of this comment, so I came back looking for it.

What have you seen specifically? All charge for the slip, electrical usage (in some way) and fuel, so what nickle and dime stuff do you see beyond the usual?
If you bring an external contractor in to work on your boat, they charge the guy for the "privilege" to work on their property, which raises the amount he has to charge you. IIRC, you generally can't do almost any work on your own boat at most of them. The list goes on...

At my marina, if you want to bring in an external contractor to do work on your boat, there's no fee or surcharge, and the only requirements the marina has is that they have proof of insurance and that they clean up after themselves.

If you want to do the work yourself on the boat, my marina is pretty good about getting you setup in a space where you can work uninterrupted, and if you have a slip or a mooring with them, they don't charge you outrageous yard fees to keep your boat on the hard while doing the work.
03-01-2011 03:46 PM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Brewers nickels and dimes you for every expense from what I've seen. They have pretty good facilities with a lot of amenities, but you end up paying for it.
SD, something came up today that made me think of this comment, so I came back looking for it.

What have you seen specifically? All charge for the slip, electrical usage (in some way) and fuel, so what nickle and dime stuff do you see beyond the usual?
02-27-2011 10:12 AM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The mounting hardware can be galvanized steel, which is probably better for dock hardware than stainless. No need for the expense of stainless steel hardware.
That's fair. Just don't use hardware store steel stuff.
02-27-2011 09:06 AM
sailingdog The mounting hardware can be galvanized steel, which is probably better for dock hardware than stainless. No need for the expense of stainless steel hardware.
02-27-2011 08:03 AM
Minnewaska
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallard View Post
If you attach permanent fenders that are intended to provide real protection for your boat, use boat fenders, like Taylor Big B or equivalent. I use 6 of these fenders (20" size) strung out horizontally over a total distance of 14 ft or so, with dock attachments at each end of the fenders
I agree and a couple of more points.

Oversize the fenders, if possible.
Use fenders that accept a line through the middle so that they will rotate as the boat move up and down against them.
Never allow them to be in permanent contact with the water.
Mounting hardware should be SS and oversized as well.
02-26-2011 06:09 PM
fallard If you attach permanent fenders that are intended to provide real protection for your boat, use boat fenders, like Taylor Big B or equivalent. I use 6 of these fenders (20" size) strung out horizontally over a total distance of 14 ft or so, with dock attachments at each end of the fenders and have had good luck over the past 5-6 years. I have 23' and 35' boats on opposite sides of the same floating dock. That said, I am in a protected area where wakes and seas are rarely a problem.

I don't have tie-off piles. If the winds pick up to 50+ knots, I'll put out larger fenders over the side of the boat(s) in case the installed fenders get squashed, but then you need to be careful that the additional fenders don't jump out of place. If 60 kts or more is predicted, I would move the boats to a storm mooring.
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