SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Sinking
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: Sinking Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
04-10-2011 05:17 PM
CapitainMike
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Joe,

The location of your bilge-pump through-hull isn't unusual, and normally shouldn't be an issue. There is supposed to be a loop of hose well above the waterline, with an anti-siphon break (also called a vented loop). This prevents water from siphoning back into the boat. Frequently, the symptoms you described above are caused by a vented loop that gets blocked up (often by dried salt crystals), allowing the creation of a siphon.

It's normally not recommended to add a check valve to your main bilge pump. Check valves are notoriously finicky and prone to jamming/clogging/failing. They also limit flow. Many people add them to a smaller "maintenance pump" to prevent drain-back and thereby keep their bilge nice and dry. But in that case, there should be a larger primary bilge pump that is not restricted by a check valve.

Sorry about the thread drift, David.
I agree with you its the same idea as an exhaust goose neck. Better to have the bilge outlet as high as possible and in the side not the stern. If you only have one pump I advise you to make it at least two pumps.
04-10-2011 03:51 PM
sailordave
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnf777 View Post
Great thread!

I like Omatako's plan of action. I would add that as skipper, you should assign duties, so many of the above tasks can be carried out simultaneously, saving precious time. I'm no longer surprised during situations (sailing and otherwise) that several people stand around doing the same thing, or all watching and give advice to the one person acting!

This question really reinforces the importance of situational awareness. When flying, if not actively engaged in another task, I'm constantly looking for where I could land if an engine were to fail, and always maintaining an awareness of my position, so if need be, I could give an immediate, accurate position. Its become so routine, its not a worrisome or energy consuming task. Its almost my way of relaxing.

On most of the boats I've sailed offshore aboard we discuss emergency management plans. Everyone is assigned duties to perform depending on the crisis. And if it's a race boat w/ lots of crew we try to always have a backup person.

For example: On a delivery if there is water in the boat everyone OFF WATCH is responsible for searching their sleeping area. Check the through-hulls/seacocks, watertanks, etc.And then move on to area's that haven't been searched yet.

IF an abandonship situation arises, there are duties assigned for grabbing the ditch bag, making Mayday calls on VHF/SSB/Sat phone, who is going to deploy the raft, etc. AND since there may be injuries.... backups to those duties.

I would disagree w/ DAVIDPM re: the PanPan to the CG. They are not going to come out just yet esp. if you let them know you are keeping up w/ or have found the source of the leak. They WILL appreciate knowing exactly where you are AND that if your Epirb goes off it is a legit emergency. That will save the time it takes them to call your contact person and verify that the boat is indeed offshore. Gets YOU rescued sooner and keeps them from a wild goose chase.
04-10-2011 02:16 PM
davidpm The idea of a Pan Pan sounds good in principle sort of like a stop loss order on a stock. In practice I got the impression from past conversations that a Pan Pan reporting taking on water is treated the same as a Mayday.
Any coast guard people on-line that know what the CG protocol is for handling calls.
04-04-2011 11:58 PM
RTB Sorry for the drift, but was there ever any official word from these crewmembers? Coast Guard rescues two off North Carolina coast | Coast Guard News Again, sorry....reading the thread reminded me of this incident.
04-04-2011 10:19 PM
dnf777 Great thread!

I like Omatako's plan of action. I would add that as skipper, you should assign duties, so many of the above tasks can be carried out simultaneously, saving precious time. I'm no longer surprised during situations (sailing and otherwise) that several people stand around doing the same thing, or all watching and give advice to the one person acting!

This question really reinforces the importance of situational awareness. When flying, if not actively engaged in another task, I'm constantly looking for where I could land if an engine were to fail, and always maintaining an awareness of my position, so if need be, I could give an immediate, accurate position. Its become so routine, its not a worrisome or energy consuming task. Its almost my way of relaxing.
04-04-2011 09:52 PM
Classic30
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
NOT that I'd intend on it moving huge quantities of water, but in addition to the bilge pump(s). I want my motor running in case the batteries crap out, in which case I'll have NO bilge pumps so I might as well get some work out of it!
Assuming it's a diesel (which can run happily without electrics), that's not a bad idea. It's also a good idea for the alternator and batteries to be mounted as high as practical - certainly not in the bilge.

Of course everyone knows that the BEST bilge pump out there is a frightened crewman with a bucket.

From practical experience, assuming everything is maintained as it should be, the very first indication that something is wrong should be when the electric bilge pump cuts in and runs continuously. A while back, water streaming through the stern gland from a failed grease nipple was only discovered when one of my crew noticed bilge water coming out of the opposite side of the boat to the exhaust...
04-04-2011 09:05 PM
SailingWebGuy At what point do you drink the rum?
04-04-2011 08:17 PM
sailordave eherlily: Good point about telling crew to put on life jackets. I guess I'm kinda already in that frame of mind from offshore racing and wear my harness/pfd a lot of the time.

Plastering a sail against the hull WILL help but I wouldn't want to try to maneuver said sail in the scenario of 5o knots! Would be hard enough under benign conditions.
04-04-2011 08:14 PM
sailordave
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
Urban legend. Check the flow rate of your engine raw water pump. Useless. You're much better off with another high rate bilge pump.
NOT that I'd intend on it moving huge quantities of water, but in addition to the bilge pump(s). I want my motor running in case the batteries crap out, in which case I'll have NO bilge pumps so I might as well get some work out of it!
04-04-2011 06:08 PM
eherlihy
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
Urban legend. Check the flow rate of your engine raw water pump. Useless. You're much better off with another high rate bilge pump.
I'm NOT a captain, and I haven't been through this kind of scenario. However, I agree with SVausipcious' assessment. The raw water pump doesn't move THAT much water. If I ever do decide that I need an extra Ĺ" hose to pump out my boat, I'll close the seacock cut the hose, and push it into the bilge where it needs to go.

What I'd do:
  1. Start the engine - I may not put it in gear, but I want some form of power to be available to me.
  2. Activate the bilge pumps - Manual and electric
  3. Contact the CG with a PanPan - let them know what I know. If in doubt about contacting the CG, contact the CG. They'll tell you what to do.
  4. Have crew put on life jackets.
  5. Look for the source of the water - try to discern if I'm gaining on it, or if the person with the manual pump needs to be flogged harder.
  6. Try to stop the leak.
  7. Bring the tender along side / ready the tender.
  8. Asses the situation & update the CG.
  9. If necessary, grab the handheld VHF and portable chart plotter, fresh water, and get them into the tender.

I have heard of wrapping a sail under the boat in order to slow the rate of water infiltration...

I've also read that Duct Tape can help.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:30 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.