SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > BA Thesis Ecoyacht
 Not a Member? 


Thread: BA Thesis Ecoyacht Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
04-15-2011 01:38 AM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by akashara View Post
- we still stick to the wing sails, and therefore are in contact with two engineers. One from Boeing who helped creating one of the Alinghi Americas Cup yachts, and the other from the HSVA, a German institute for hydro and aerodynamic research.
I would think that a wing sail ala-Americas Cup on a cruising sailboat is a really bad idea.

America's Cup - AC45 #1 Damaged in Capsize, Crew Safe: Photo Gallery - from CupInfo

Read the story as well as have a look at the pics.

These sails are difficult to manage even in controlled conditions, out there with heavy seas and strong winds a rig like this will be a handfull even for highly skilled racing crew.

And I would venture to suggest that they are probably the most expensive in the world size for size at this time.
04-14-2011 07:06 AM
akashara Maybe sth like a disk flywheel. Its also used in some public transport buses for saving energy.

Here is a little update so far:

The yacht will be a charter yacht for 6 persons. The aspect of sharing is more reasonable, and a high building cost doesn't weight that high with a charter yacht.
-therefore it will be a catamaran, since there is a lot more space
- right now we think a lot about the energy problem: a solution seems to be a fuel cell; it has a far higher energy density than batteries or fuel, and is completely without emissions. A fuel cell (in combination with solar panels) could obtain enough energy for a 1-2 week turn. The hydrogen needed could be carried in pressure tanks or bounded in a special granulate (which is safer).
even issues like the cooking gas could be solved with hydrogen.
- an idea was to create the hydrogen needed at the charter base; at the marina could be a device which gets hydrogen through electrolyse (you only need salt water, 2 electrodes and electrical power for it). the power could come from wind generators or from water or wind powerplants near the marina.
- we still stick to the wing sails, and therefore are in contact with two engineers. One from Boeing who helped creating one of the Alinghi Americas Cup yachts, and the other from the HSVA, a German institute for hydro and aerodynamic research.



-akashara
04-14-2011 06:09 AM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
What about a system like what some busses have (and F1 race cars), where energy is stored mechanically in some sort of coil, then released for propulsion?
Not that I am an afficionado on F1 race cars but I have never heard of such a device being used on them. I know that the driver empties his pockets to reduce weight before he gets into the car so this concept is quite original (to me anyway).

Given the concept is used in most hybrid motor cars, it is not that new but how would you do that in a boat?
04-13-2011 04:02 PM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
What about a system like what some busses have (and F1 race cars), where energy is stored mechanically in some sort of coil, then released for propulsion?
Do you mean like winding a spring?
04-13-2011 03:54 PM
Barquito What about a system like what some busses have (and F1 race cars), where energy is stored mechanically in some sort of coil, then released for propulsion?
04-13-2011 10:40 AM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
OK so realistic sustainability means that we have to continually put some resource into the game but we're going to strive to do that as little as possible and be as green as possible. Well, no secret there - yachtsmen the world over have been doing that for centuries. Some just do it better than others but we all strive for that goal.

But is there a thesis in there somewhere? I think the OP's challenge is going to be making it sound complicated enough - which it isn't.
The other challenge will be, as you say, striving to put as few resources in as possible and be as green as possible, which I haven't seen much of in their original plan.
04-13-2011 05:58 AM
Omatako What do you mean when you define sustainable. Sustainable in its pure form to me means one can carry on doing it forever without any external input. Well, clearly a yacht sailing around the world does not fit that definition because God knows, I pour vast resources into my boat just to keep it functional and I'm no different to most.

If sustainable means that you start off by pouring a mountain of money into a boat and hope that it lasts until you die and don't have to replace anything, then I don't buy the theory. That's like everyone starting life as a billionaire and dying with nothing. Everbody knows that is anti-reality.

OK so realistic sustainability means that we have to continually put some resource into the game but we're going to strive to do that as little as possible and be as green as possible. Well, no secret there - yachtsmen the world over have been doing that for centuries. Some just do it better than others but we all strive for that goal.

But is there a thesis in there somewhere? I think the OP's challenge is going to be making it sound complicated enough - which it isn't.
04-13-2011 04:14 AM
Indevolatile
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Instead, I propose flywheels! You put a flywheel in a vacuum, suspend it with electromagnets, and spin it up. Much more efficient energy storage than batteries, much lower maintenance, and less harmful waste. For a small sailboat, I suspect some sort of gimbaling system would be in order, otherwise you'd lose a lot of energy to gyroscopic precession. Also not sure what sort of weight we're talking about.

Still, that would be a sustainable yacht project I'd like to see.
On the other had, with gyroscopic stabilization, you could do away with any ballast. I wonder if it's ever been tried?
04-12-2011 06:24 PM
mgmhead The original post reminds me of Steve Martin's bit on how to never pay taxes again... "First you get a Million Dollars!"
04-12-2011 04:46 PM
AdamLein In other news, batteries are bad for the environment. Not very often, for the average sailor, I admit, but once in a while you have to dispose of some toxic waste. Instead, I propose flywheels! You put a flywheel in a vacuum, suspend it with electromagnets, and spin it up. Much more efficient energy storage than batteries, much lower maintenance, and less harmful waste. For a small sailboat, I suspect some sort of gimbaling system would be in order, otherwise you'd lose a lot of energy to gyroscopic precession. Also not sure what sort of weight we're talking about.

Still, that would be a sustainable yacht project I'd like to see.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:14 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.