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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > I just want to sail away..
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Thread: I just want to sail away.. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-17-2011 06:48 PM
pistonbully Thanks Arf,, I'll buy the first round on Bimini!
05-17-2011 09:37 AM
arf145 Been following this thread like I follow all the ones on this subject--I like to see what the dreamers are dreaming. A lot of these just don't look like they're going to go anywhere. But you seem like you have a good head on your shoulders, pistonbully, and I have no doubt you'll do what you're dreaming. Good luck to you. I hope you stay on Sailnet as you work on it.
05-16-2011 05:11 PM
pistonbully Thanks guys. I appreciate all the book suggestions. I am getting so much info together for my plan! It's looking more and more doable, and i'm beginning to get less and less intimidated by the idea of setting sail.

One thing I have already done in preparation is to order "the Wirie" for wifi for my boat. As soon as it gets here i'm canceling my internet. that's an extra $50 a month towards the kitty!!

My boss is funny too,, In the last two weeks he has asked me to fill in for two dif over time shifts. I've been like "Dude, you don't even have to ask just put me on the schedule !". He's loving the fact that I say yes to every opportunity to work extra.
05-16-2011 12:49 PM
imagine2frolic A good honest book to read is by Tom Neal All in the same boat. BEST WISHES in breaking out of what is considered the normal......i2f
05-16-2011 09:22 AM
JordanH I came across this thread on CF and thought it might help in your planning.
Cruising on $500 per Month . . . - Cruisers & Sailing Forums

Lots of good discussion on what items need to be in your budget, what is critical spending and what kind of life you'll lead at $500/mo budget. There are, of course, differing opinions throughout the thread on what is necessary, what is missing etc. So lots to help you create your own particular financial plan while you save up at your current job.
05-05-2011 08:31 PM
pistonbully I hear yea,, But i'm just not good with the idea of taking off from a good paying job with barely enough to get myself out there.. and completely throw my self into it.. I need a stack in the bank first.It just spells disaster to me..
05-04-2011 11:11 PM
Harborless Do your self a big favor. Don't wait two years, go out and get a boat now. Lots of 1-3K boats out there in the 25-30 LOA range that are easily sailable. Just looked at a 25' 1977 Columbia today going for $1,000. Has a working diesel and all the standing rigging is in good shape. Just needs a new main and a lot of interior wood work. I tell you if it had the standing room I need I would have bought it out right and as it stands I am seriously considering buying it anyway just for the scrap value.
What I am saying is, before you take the big plunge put your toe in the water. Bottom line, if you buy a boat that floats for under $3,000 you will always be able to get back what you paid for it in two years when your ready for big momma.
Dont let the dream fade or the time slip. IF your serious about sailing and doing what you state then take the first step and put some cash down. I know its scary looking at cheap boats.. Rot, old wiring and rustic engines with blisters on the hull... Of course thats not all on one boat, or one your seriously considering anyway, but those are the sorts of things that will be off on those kind of boats. The good news is if your willing ti put the elbow grease in your self, and you live within 25 miles of a Home Depot, then you can get everything you need for CHEAP AND learn how to do all the work yourself. Another benefit? Since your doing the work on a run down boat it doesnt matter if its perfect. The boat is the learning experience. Just make sure it has a good hull, good rigging, and sail. Blisters, rot all that stuff is easily fixed.
Also, you really dont even NEED to fix most the stuff. If you have rot in places or your port holes leak a bit so what? Its a starter boat meant only to get you on the water and with sailing experience in your belt. Now, disclaimer: You should NOT sail in the ocean with a leaky boat. However, Rivers lakes and other water body types that are more protected are not a big deal. The things that really bug you can be your projects and every thing you do will add experience to your arsenal and possibly add value to your boat come sell time.
Sorry for the tangent but I hate to read so many "I wanna..." post about far off dreams that easily slip your grasp if you dont take hold. Carpe diem friend. Besides, you got a trove of knowledge at your finger tips with this forum to guide you along the way.
One more thing, if your really nervous about all the big boat stuff or just don't have the money right now then join a local sailing or yacht club. Fees run around $100 a month most places and there you can get experience on small dinghy boats or even gain spots crewing on larger boats.
Read the books at night and hold fast by day. Ain't going to get salty just by eatin Morton's
05-04-2011 10:06 PM
pistonbully That's a good start!


Hull integrity/condition of keel bolts/paint
Engine condition/hours/maintenance history
Packing nut assembly/prop
Rigging/sails
Electrical integrity
Plumbing integrity
05-04-2011 08:32 PM
tomperanteau
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
A copy of Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, would be a good investment. Do your own presurvey. Lots of boats will be eliminated this way. A lot of it is not rocket science.

When you start looking seriously make up a check list and take a digital camera and photograph everything.
Yes, yes and yes. A digital camera is a must. Use it to reach behind and under places where you can't see. I use mine all the time to inspect connections for the fresh water tank, holding tank connections and mount, areas in the engine room I can't get to, the bilge, closeups of the rigging, etc. Take a tablet and write down notes on everything. Post the pics here so we can all comment. Make sure that you check all the most costly things twice.

Our list of most important items started in this order:
  • Hull integrity/condition of keel bolts/paint
  • Engine condition/hours/maintenance history
  • Packing nut assembly/prop
  • Rigging/sails
  • Electrical integrity
  • Plumbing integrity

The most important were of course those things that would sink you - literally. Then came the things that would cost the most to repair/replace, then the other pesky items that would cost money and time. The list is much longer than this, but these were at the top.

If you've taken 200+ pictures of everything and you have a few pages of notes, then you have a start.
05-04-2011 08:08 PM
TQA A copy of Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, would be a good investment. Do your own presurvey. Lots of boats will be eliminated this way. A lot of it is not rocket science.

When you start looking seriously make up a check list and take a digital camera and photograph everything.
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