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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Anchoring.
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Thread: Anchoring. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-09-2011 03:50 AM
noelex77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
Amen to that, brother. I pull the boat back under power until the bow dips and that's it. If the boat can't pull her out under power, she ain't gonna do it with the wind/tide.

I have dragged an anchor unexpectedly so seldom, I can't recall many.

The number of times I have dived on my anchor are even less. I can't recall one.
Setting the anchor under at least full cruising revs is essential, but it only exerts the same pull as a moderate wind strength. It does not guarantee the anchor holding in stronger wind.
Occasionally it can be very misleading. The anchor or chain can caught on a rock leaving the anchor unset.
For these sort of reasons its very helpful to dive on your anchor.

In some parts of the world its too cold or dangerous to do this, but if its practical its the most reliable method of determining if you are anchored correctly. Its also worth looking at the anchors of the boats upwind.
05-09-2011 02:58 AM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonScribner View Post
And what is this about DIVING on the anchor??? I don't THINK so!
Amen to that, brother. I pull the boat back under power until the bow dips and that's it. If the boat can't pull her out under power, she ain't gonna do it with the wind/tide.

I have dragged an anchor unexpectedly so seldom, I can't recall many.

The number of times I have dived on my anchor are even less. I can't recall one.
05-08-2011 11:15 AM
ScuzzMonkey
Quote:
Originally Posted by motion300 View Post
I have a different take on this Say you anchor in 90 ft of water, in pulling the anchor once it is is loose the boat is free to move. Well if single handed and with no windless this will take some time to retrieve the anchor and all that rode back on deck. I guess if the tide is in your favor no big problem but if is not, how does on control the boat and pull the anchor at the same time
Speaking personally, at least after the first time, what one does is put a lot of consideration into wind, tide, and anchoring location before dropping the hook in the first place!

The times I have not done so with sufficient perspicacity, I've gotten out of it with a lot of running back and forth between helm and foredeck, getting some momentum built up and then hauling in as much as I can before going back and getting control again. Not fun, a lot of heart-in-mouth moments, and always a good reminder to think about how you're going to get out before you go in.
05-08-2011 09:34 AM
motion300 I have a different take on this Say you anchor in 90 ft of water, in pulling the anchor once it is is loose the boat is free to move. Well if single handed and with no windless this will take some time to retrieve the anchor and all that rode back on deck. I guess if the tide is in your favor no big problem but if is not, how does on control the boat and pull the anchor at the same time
05-08-2011 01:05 AM
sailjunkie We have 300 feet of line and 30 feet of chain. We've anchored in just over 40 feet, and I wouldn't want to go much deeper. Even with a manual windlass, I still get a great upper body workout at that depth.

Theoretically, with that much rode and chain, we could anchor in 100 feet at 3:1 scope. However, as Faster and others have suggested, you then have to get it back on board.

As for diving? We live on Canada's west coast. Diving is a great way to get hypothermia!
05-07-2011 07:19 PM
DonScribner Anchoring is primarily limited by the scope, or ration, of the length of the rode (anchor line) to the dept of the water. 3:12 if it's a calm day and you're stopped for lunch or to watch bikini herds in their native environment. Sleeping in a protected cove, 5:1. A little wind blowing 7:1. And add for the height of the bow. SO . . . calm night, drop anchor in 25 feet, let out 150' of rode. It there was 60 feet below me, I'd need 325 feet out.

And what is this about DIVING on the anchor??? I don't THINK so!
05-07-2011 06:46 PM
TQA 60 feet is as deep as I usually anchor but there are a couple of spots where I have anchored in 180 feet. 200 feet of chain and 200 of rope 400 feet or about 2.2 to 1.

The electric windlass is a my friend!
05-07-2011 05:25 PM
noelex77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
There are some rare instances when one has to anchor deep but I can never see any reason to anchor deeper than the tidal range plus a metre.

All deep anchoring does is wears out your batteries or arms whichever is the last system of retrieval. Unless of course you have a 10lb anchor, three metres of chain and the rest of the rode is rope. Then the weight of getting it all back on board is easy.
Everyone would like to anchor as shallow as possible, but in many parts of the world there is deep water close to shore.
I am anchored at the moment in 10m of water, but I am only 70m from shore.
My draft is 2m, but there is no way I could safely drop my anchor in 3m.
.
05-07-2011 03:56 PM
Omatako There are some rare instances when one has to anchor deep but I can never see any reason to anchor deeper than the tidal range plus a metre.

All deep anchoring does is wears out your batteries or arms whichever is the last system of retrieval. Unless of course you have a 10lb anchor, three metres of chain and the rest of the rode is rope. Then the weight of getting it all back on board is easy.

For example I have a friend who has an anchor as described with 200metres of rope an 4 metres of light chain on his 18ft fishing boat and he regularly anchors in 50 metres.

Conversely, my anchor weighs 40lbs and I use 30 metres of chain before the rope goes out. Life's too short to expend it on hauling that back on board
05-07-2011 02:07 PM
Faster After answering the question of how much rode you have.. the next qualifier is windlass or not? We still use the Armstrong retrieval method and so try not to anchor deeper than 50 feet or so with chain/rope rode. That can be a challenge in BC as we are not known for shoal waters, but most good anchorages do provide areas of 20-40 feet.

Of course with all chain rode lifting by hand is much more severely limited. Then you want that typical 15-20 feet so that that's all the chain you actually need to lift at any one time. We too anchor in 5-6 meters max in the Caribbean with all chain and no windlass on our friends' boat and hoisting that back aboard can be a challenge when the wind pipes up.
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