SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Size & Type: Dock lines vs. Mooring lines
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Size & Type: Dock lines vs. Mooring lines Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
05-19-2011 11:29 PM
JordanH
Quote:
Originally Posted by tap View Post
Seems like a lot of trouble to have your lines shackled to the dock, if you wanted to take them with you on the boat. Do you put a wire or zip tie through the shackle pin to keep them from unscrewing open?

Do lines have a problem chafing through where they are tied to a dock cleat? My lines seem to get far more wear where they rub something on the boat.
That's the point; You do not take your mooring lines with you - they are permanently attached to the dock for the season. Yes, the shackles are wired as a requirement (and out of good sense).

If you were to permanently attach lines to a dock cleat or bollard for a whole season, they will definitely chafe. How much? I suppose that depends on movement and how much the line works back and forth.
05-19-2011 11:07 PM
tap Seems like a lot of trouble to have your lines shackled to the dock, if you wanted to take them with you on the boat. Do you put a wire or zip tie through the shackle pin to keep them from unscrewing open?

Do lines have a problem chafing through where they are tied to a dock cleat? My lines seem to get far more wear where they rub something on the boat.
05-19-2011 10:42 PM
JordanH
Quote:
Originally Posted by tap View Post
So your lines don't chafe because they are chain. What keeps your boat from chafing because you're tied to a dock with chain?
The lines aren't chain, they are rope. The lines have a thimble spliced into the end of the line - exactly like you'd have on an anchor line - where it connects to the chain. The chain is secured to the dock, the chain is basically just a shackle on the dockside. The free end of the line is then attached to the boat as per normal; Bow, stern or spring line.

We are talking about chafe of the mooring line where it meets the dock so to answer your question specifically, it is the thimble spliced into the end of the line that prevents chafe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RhythmDoctor
Doesn't chain rust given enough time and exposure to the elements?
Yeah, I suppose it would. Far slower than line chafe and, since we're in Canada, they definitely outlast our sailing season - it's only a few months *sigh*
05-19-2011 09:06 PM
TakeFive Doesn't chain rust given enough time and exposure to the elements?
05-19-2011 04:07 PM
SVAuspicious In most of the world, outside the US, tying up to a dock is considered mooring.
05-19-2011 03:26 PM
tap So your lines don't chafe because they are chain. What keeps your boat from chafing because you're tied to a dock with chain?
05-19-2011 02:34 PM
JordanH To clarify what I'm going on aboot, I use the terms in this way;
I use the term "docking lines" for lines that I use in the process of docking as well as while temporarily attaching myself to a dock. I mean, they are not permanently fixed to the dock.

I use the term "mooring lines" for lines that are permanently attached to where I moor. Although we often think of this as a mooring ball, it is not limited to such. No translation required, "mooring" has the same meaning in the simplified, American English version of the dictionary. (g). In my case, the mooring will be floating docks at the club

A typical practice, and often requirement, at yacht clubs is to permanently attach chain to the docks (or cleats) and then the lines are permanently attached to the chain via a thimble spliced into the mooring line. This provides a strong attachment point with good chafe protection... good for safety, good for club insurance. :-)

I boil it down to mooring lines stay on the dock, docking lines are kept aboard the boat.
05-19-2011 02:01 PM
hellosailor I'm confused here. You're mooring against a dock?

Are you docking alongside a dock? Or moored to a ball? Or docking bow/stern in, med style?

I've never heard of thimbles being used or needed in a docking line, which is normally cleated off in the US. (I'm probably losing something in the translation, I'm not really fluent in Canadian. (G) )

The purpose of 3-strand docking lines is that they have some natural spring in them, as you pull tight they untwist a bit, acting as a torsion spring for their entire length. A braided line can't and won't do that, making it unsuitable for docking or mooring lines as it will chafe instead of stretching. Sure, they feel smoother and can be used--but they're the wrong line for the job. Wornout halyards, etc. are often the source of braided "docking" lines, just being used a bit longer before they get scrapped.
05-19-2011 04:52 AM
tap Don't use that page as a splicing guide. That splice is completely wrong. The strength of an eye splice comes from the bury of the line inside itself. Not from poking the core though the core a bunch of times. All he did was make a huge stress riser where the diameter of the line suddenly shrunk were the splice ended, and sure enough that's where his splice broke.

It's like tying a dozen overhand knots instead of bowline. An overhand knot is weaker than a bowline. A dozen overhand knots doesn't get any stronger, but it does get stupider.

A proper double braid splice can be seen here: YouTube - ‪splicing double braid‬‏
Or in these instructions. http://www.samsonrope.com/site_files...Splice_Rev.pdf
05-18-2011 12:54 PM
JordanH Ok, I have my answers. Now to go looking for good deals...

Peter, great! I like working with rope and will add braid splicing to my repertoire soon. I've bookmarked that link, it's a good one. Thanks!
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:53 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.