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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Everyone...Share your checklist
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Thread: Everyone...Share your checklist Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-27-2011 12:43 AM
jerryrlitton I have used some sort of check list all of my professional life. The military used one, we called it a "to do list" since every item was a challenge/response with the appropriate flicking of the switch. It covered everything however it was a pain in the butt and freakin slow. Then I went to the airlines with a whole new attitude. They called it a "flow" which was to be memorized in it's entirety. The pilot flying would call for a check list such as "before taxi checklist" (at this point that was the captain) and the FO would say "before taxi checklist" and would do everything in order from memory THEN he would pull out THE checklist and verify all was done. This greatly speeded up the process without compromising safety.
I think some sort of check list is a good idea, not too comprehensive and should be used as a flow. Do the items then pull out the checklist to verify. Modify it to you, your boat and different conditions. Just something to cover the high points such as "Install bungs BEFORE backing boat into the water". You will be surprised on how easy it is to be distracted.

Jerry
06-26-2011 05:22 PM
St Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
I used to be a private pilot. Even though my instructors beat into me the concept of using a pre-flight checklist, I figured that eventually I would forgo it. (I was young and stupid at the time). Then I flew with an older buddy of mine who had several tours in Vietnam flying F-4's, then spent time in Iraq (Shah era) teaching the Iranian's how to fly F-14's for Gruman. He ALWAYS used a check list. Every flight, no matter how far, VFH or IFH. I gained a whole new respect for the idea of checklists.

Having said that, I don't have one for the boat, but I'm working on it. My wife is a list type of person, I'm not. However, with other family on the boat, a checklist seems like a very good idea.

I'll also admit to being distracted one day with my C36 and leaving the marina without opening the engine intake. Now I keep the ignition key looped over the intake seacock. I can't grab the ignition key without at least touching the water intake.
Hiya Dhays,
I agree it sounds much safer to have a list. I have a list for if we have to start the epirb and get in the life raft. I am forgetful as much as anyone and have headed off without the instruments on and no plotter in, but fixed tht up once out of the marina.

My question was simply -"Does one need a list to drive a car?" You have set up a system - ignition key near engine intake. This is much smarter in my book.
cheers
06-26-2011 02:29 PM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
Winterizing
Provisioning
Maintenance
Winterizing is easy. I don't. *grin* Once the water temp gets close to freezing I keep a small oil-filled radiator on the boat when I am away and a diesel heater to stay cozy when I'm aboard.

Provisioning is very personal as so much depends on taste and cooking style.

I have a dry & canned goods stowage list on the boat for where things are. I keep a print-out in the galley. When I move something from deep stowage to the galley it gets crossed off as "used" even though it is still in the pantry. The list drives a shopping list.

For fridge, freezer, and pantry I have a whole series of menu plans and shopping lists from deliveries. The menu plans drive shopping lists that get checked against the pantry before I go shopping.

I'm not very good at repetitive tasks so I've set this up to take as little attention as possible. Every year or so I empty all the deep storage and repack it, updating the storage list at the same time. When I defrost the fridge and freezer I make sure older stuff is used or pitched. I inventory the pantry while the fridge & freezer melt. Then everything gets scrubbed.

Most maintenance on my boat is done by association. If I'm changing the oil in the main I do the gen and outboard at the same time. Same with fuel filters. I rebuild winches when I can't quite remember when I last did them. Whatever is close by or uses the same tools and supplies gets done. I've started maintenance check-lists a bunch of times but for my personality they simply haven't been sustainable.
06-26-2011 02:12 PM
dhays
Quote:
Originally Posted by St Anna View Post
Throw away the list and understand the boat and the process - it becomes part of your (life) routine and you are not wasting grey matter on thoughts other than what you are doing, which is going for a sail.

cheers and good sailing
I used to be a private pilot. Even though my instructors beat into me the concept of using a pre-flight checklist, I figured that eventually I would forgo it. (I was young and stupid at the time). Then I flew with an older buddy of mine who had several tours in Vietnam flying F-4's, then spent time in Iraq (Shah era) teaching the Iranian's how to fly F-14's for Gruman. He ALWAYS used a check list. Every flight, no matter how far, VFH or IFH. I gained a whole new respect for the idea of checklists.

Having said that, I don't have one for the boat, but I'm working on it. My wife is a list type of person, I'm not. However, with other family on the boat, a checklist seems like a very good idea.

I'll also admit to being distracted one day with my C36 and leaving the marina without opening the engine intake. Now I keep the ignition key looped over the intake seacock. I can't grab the ignition key without at least touching the water intake.
06-26-2011 05:49 AM
centaursailor Not good with lists but heres my routine.
Out-Jump on, open up and look around, start engine, cast off
Back- Tie up, engine off, tidy up if not knackered otherwise goes to line above, alarms on, hop off, go to the pub.
safe sailing
06-26-2011 04:06 AM
St Anna We are in a warm climate so it would be different.

I think that the more times you go out, it becomes automatic and if living aboard, then just untie the lines of course.

Throw away the list and understand the boat and the process - it becomes part of your (life) routine and you are not wasting grey matter on thoughts other than what you are doing, which is going for a sail.

cheers and good sailing
06-26-2011 03:31 AM
L124C Searched the forum for a thread on checklists and found nothing. Started my own thread, then stumbled on this one! Anyway, here is a Pre and Post trip checklist I've found useful:
PRE TRIP

Disconnect shore power (if applicable)
Rotate Head Cowling aft (if applicable)

V BERTH
Secure dehumidifiers (Port and Starboard)
Secure Hatch

HEAD
Sink valve CLOSED
Head water intake valve (thru hull) OPEN
Head water intake (lever right side of head) CLOSED (horizontal)
Empty water in Head

SALON
Secure Hatch
Motor coolant valve OPEN
Maint. pump OFF
Bilge pump AUTO
Sink valve CLOSED
Knot meter in (if applicable)
VHF radio ON (channel 16)
Instruments ON

POST TRIP

Connect shore power (if applicable)
Rotate Cowling (if applicable)

SALON
Instruments and all panel switches (other than cabin lights) OFF
VHF Radio OFF
Engine coolant valve CLOSED
Batteries switched to BOTH
Knot meter out (if applicable)
Maint. pump AUTO
Bilge pump AUTO

HEAD
Head water intake valve (thru hull) CLOSED
Sink drain (thru hull) OPEN

V BERTH
Open Dehumidifiers (Port and Starboard)

BEFORE CLOSING COMPANIONWAY
Check that Bilge pump is switched to AUTO and Batteries are switched to BOTH
11-05-2006 04:41 PM
TrueBlue Checklists will be very different for different boats, owners, sailing locations and cruising habits. Unless a boat owner is relatively new to the joys and sorrows of boat ownership, he will have developed a routine for maintenance schedules, provisioning and winterization.

I have owned several boats within the past 28 years and even though I started writing checklists with earlier boats, eventually an intuitive process proved to be more effective. It's laughable to see some of the extensive written checklists used by other sailors . . . you'd think they suffered from short-term memory loss, or Alzheimer's disease.

Do you have a checklist for maintaing your own body? A reasonably healthy daily routine, with deviations administered using common sense, leads to a long life - for boat and self. Get to know your boat intimately and she will tell you what she needs to remain happy.
11-05-2006 03:44 PM
T37Chef I would rather maintain than wait for it to break. Sounds like a accident waiting to happen?
11-05-2006 03:40 PM
Gene T Go sailing, fix what breaks. OK, so winterizing in CA is a misnomer. About the only schedule I use here is - change engine oil in January, varnish in April and October, put the 150 Jenny on in October and switch to the 110 in March. Everything else is on an as needed basis.
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