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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2 Weeks Ago 02:46 PM
robert sailor Smack a boats a boat and they all share strengths and weaknesses. Sure some are built better than others and some will retain value for a longer period of time but in the end they are all money sponges. The poorest choice I made was taking a C&C 36 offshore but having said that it didn't cost me a lot of money plus it was probably the best of times and I still have the best memories from that cruise. Everything was rudimentary, no GPS or chart plotters in those days, no solar panels or water makers, they were not available but one of the best times of my life.
Of course back then a 36 was a big boat as most people were cruising in 30 to 34 footers and if you had your Hunter 40 you'd quite probably be the big boat in the anchorage.
These days the boats are bigger,they are much more complicated and cost a ton more to maintain plus the sailors are much older, go figure.
You can pretty much pick any boat apart, mind you that's an Internet thing as no one I know out here would ever have a negative comment on someone else's boat, just not proper.
Best advise is to buy the best boat you can for your budget and know before hand if you are going to cross oceans with it your going to be writing some checks or if your fortunate and are real handy maybe you'll be limited to parts. Coastal sailing is very easy on your boat compared to offshore sailing. Offshore you have the boat cycling 24/7 for days on end. Every passage I have done I start out with everything tikideboo and end up with 30 plus items to repair replace when I arrive. The last time it was the engine and that was a killer. So I guess what I'm saying is that no matter the boat you'll be constantly fixing it. If you are only out for a year or two then probably not so much but if you are voyaging for multi years you could easily spend half your cruising budget on boat maintance and repairs..
Long answer to your questions but even boats of the same type and year have different problems..
2 Weeks Ago 02:18 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
Smack I argue with you but I hope you know it's with true respect.
It's mutual Out. Definitely. I learn a lot from our epic diatribes.
2 Weeks Ago 01:33 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by robert sailor View Post
To answer your question prior to your tirade, we lost the engine enroute across the Atlantic and sat on the hook for the better part of 3 months before getting repowered. I guess you could say we were hookside sailors for that time period.
And my point is - it doesn't matter. Either the argument one is making in a discussion is a good one or it is not - regardless of where one's boat is. So make good arguments - or don't. Either way, it's much more grown up.

What are the direct benefits you see on your Oyster (what year?) that make it well-suited to blue water - and/or what issues have you faced with it that make you question quality/build in certain areas? And have those things been maintained by Oyster in subsequent years? That's an educational discussion. Outbound has been particularly good at that - and though I don't agree with everything he says, it's always a good discussion.
2 Weeks Ago 01:29 PM
robert sailor Wow what a response Smack, your obviously a very tough guy who gets his jollys beating dogs with sticks. Grow up and learn to not take yourself so seriously. My Daddy used to remind me that growing old was inevitable but growing up was optional. To answer your question prior to your tirade, we lost the engine enroute across the Atlantic and sat on the hook for the better part of 3 months before getting repowered. I guess you could say we were hookside sailors for that time period.
2 Weeks Ago 12:57 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

How long were you without your engine robert? Did it make you a "dockside sailor".

I don't "poke dogs with sticks". I smack those proverbial "dogs" across the snout with said rhetorical stick - then do it again when they stand and start growling. I repeat until they go back to grandma's basement and lie back down quietly. Very different tactic than what you describe.

So don't get me started.

If you've got comments or ideas that relate to the merits of production boats, speak up. If you want to take personal shots and/or try to compare blue water wienies to try to substantiate a ridiculous argument, expect the stick.
2 Weeks Ago 08:51 AM
robert sailor Good come back RP I can see why you have so many friends here. Lots of people like to dish it out but have extreme difficulty in taking a joke. Life is too short.
2 Weeks Ago 08:40 AM
bobperry
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Robert:
I stalked you.

I hear you. I like to poke the dog to once and a while so I've always been far game for the same treatment.
2 Weeks Ago 07:43 AM
robert sailor RP I don't think Smack needs help, he's a big boy. As to him spending time on his boat, I'm sure he does.. My comments on him being at the dock at are directly related to him not having an engine. If you like poking the dog with a stick from time to time you have to man up and laugh when it comes your way every now and then. But how did you find out I was living in Grandma's basement?? Lol
2 Weeks Ago 12:25 AM
outbound
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Smack I argue with you but I hope you know it's with true respect. Think you're among the white hats.
BS not so much.

BTW think miles traveled by itself doesn't immediately confer respect. Have done passage with a pro captain with many miles. Couldn't wait for him to get off the boat. Learned nothing and neither did he but I think he hasn't learned anything in some decades. Passage was helpful in gaining some confidence in myself. Nuff said.
2 Weeks Ago 12:04 AM
bobperry
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Robert: You need to read more carefully . Smacks spends a lot of time on his boat. But if you want to tun this into an internet dick measuring contest between guys with "hide behind" fake names then be my guest. I know who Smackers is. You could be a 14 year old with pimples in his mother's basement. I think you know who I am.
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