SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > where has the hand crank gone????
 Not a Member? 


Thread: where has the hand crank gone???? Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
08-18-2006 12:44 AM
yotphix As a kid on a sail training ship we had a one cylinder diesel genny that we always started on a handcrank. It took a little practice but once you got the hang of it it went decompression, three spins, throw back the lever and voila! Perfect every time. To be fair, a one cylinder probably had a very heavy flywheel. Also the learning curve could be painful if you threw the lever at the wrong time and got a backfire. Wrist twist if you didn't let go, a crank in the chin if you did!

My folks also had a Lada car from Russia in the eighties that came with a crank and i tried that with sucess each time although to be fair, gas engines are easy.
08-18-2006 12:28 AM
paulk Have had several occasions where getting our 22hp Yanmar 3GM to start by handcrank would have been very convenient. Despite carefully following directions, releasing compression, cranking like mad, etc., not even a pop. We now carry a spare battery power-starter pack. It's easier to find and less rusty than the crank, though we haven't needed it...yet.
08-17-2006 09:35 PM
Dewey Benson My experience mirrors Omatako,

Little bitty Yanny on a nor'sea 27. The dudes batt fried. I (not a big guy) and two really big guys about died from exaustion, but coundnt get it to pop. It is to be said the little bugger did have compression release but the flywheel was pretty much non-existant.

Those volvo's have a good size flywheel and that might help. But for the most part.... just forget hand starting.

OH yeah, I miss the kick starts on bikes too.

Dewey
08-16-2006 04:57 AM
Omatako
Hand-crank a Yanmar ... Yeah, right!!

The next person to start a Yanmar 3GM30 on a hand crank will be the very first and if someone says they've done it, plug him onto a lie detector because I don't believe it. And if they pass the lie-detector test, test his compression next, the engine's probably knackered.

I tried on mine using every known trick (other than connecting it to my main sheet!!) and never even got close. The broken wrist is about right.

And this is a little engine.
08-15-2006 11:55 PM
captnnero
he don't need no stinkin starter

Quote:
Originally Posted by timebandit
...
I read somewhere that some enterprising sailor rigged a line to the main boom and used the wind in the sail to pull a rope to start his engine.
...
That was an article in Sail or Cruising World several years ago complete with a nice 3D drawing of the starter cord routing. It was ingenious. As I recall he had about a 40 footer. He rigged it up with the mainsail in tight but on a reach. Then he let the mainsheet out to spin the motor. He started this way on a daily basis for a while to charge batteries until the next port.
08-15-2006 11:06 PM
sailingdog Hand cranking a diesel is generally a losing option. Much higher compression makes it much harder to crank a diesel, compared to a gasoline engine. A better idea would be to carry a emergency jump start pack... like this.
08-15-2006 03:08 PM
Cruisingdad funny timebandit
08-15-2006 01:01 PM
timebandit
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Just curious, how are you supposed to know that on a diesel? Also, I would think with the compression on a diesel, moving that thing at all would take a small act of God.
Just like any engine, just move it slowly through and then past the compression stroke.
I'm guessing most engines fire on the compression stroke.
I read somewhere that some enterprising sailor rigged a line to the main boom and used the wind in the sail to pull a rope to start his engine.
Personnaly I would just sail over a water fall and pop the clutch about half way down
08-15-2006 12:43 PM
Ronbye I have started my Volvo MD2B engine on hand crank. To start the engine you need to have the engine rotating fast enough to get through the power stroke. Not easy if you don't have decompression levers. Mine does. Secondly, the heat in the comustion chamber needs to be hot enough to ignite the air fuel mixture, I don't have glow plugs. So for me, this means that I have to crank the engine over with the decompression levers on and keep cranking until I think there is enough friction heat available. When I think it is right, I turn off one compression lever while cranking. When it starts on one cylinder, the crank handle slips in its slot, allowing me time to remove it and turn off the other decompression lever and the engine is now running on two cylinders. It sounds easy, but it is very difficult physically. You need to be in shape for this. If you have any medical problems at all I wouldn't attempt it.
08-15-2006 12:22 PM
Cruisingdad Just curious, how are you supposed to know that on a diesel? Also, I would think with the compression on a diesel, moving that thing at all would take a small act of God.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:33 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.