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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-02-2011 01:37 AM
tdw One question re the Romaine ... from the pics I cannot figure out where the head is located. I'm guessing in one of the quarter cabins .... stoop to conquer ...
08-01-2011 10:48 PM
mitiempo I agree with tdw.

The Jouet could be ok but its IOR design is not the best for your purposes.

Trisfer - forget it.

CT41 - pretty boat with a wood deck and cabin that would get a no from me.

The Romaine looks interesting. Not an extreme design in any way I can see and looks good in the pictures. New engine (Beta) as well. This one would be my choice of any boat in this thread.
08-01-2011 07:56 PM
tdw So many folk who end up with steel/cement or old neglected wood do so because they want more boat than they can afford. In every harbour you'll then find them going even further to wrack and ruin cos if you can barely afford to buy that fixer upper then you can probably not afford to maintain her.

In another thread recently we had a fellow who has never sailed before wanting to buy a 100' timber schooner cos he found 50' too claustrophobic. There is not arguing with people like this, all you can do is watch the impending train wreck.

What's more the number of times these oversized hulks are owned by single males, well and truely down on their uppers is perhaps no coincidence.

LaFayette, I am not trying to be overly negative but having been through the timber boat fixer upper stage myself and barely come out the other side please be careful. If you don't have experience of doing what needs to be done yourself or at least you are a very fast learner a cheap boat can get very expensive, very quickly.

Sub 40' glass is a much better place to start than plus 40' anything.

Looking at the Jouet its hard to tell how much work is complete and how much still to be done but the size is good. I'm not a hull expert so could be wrong here, but she looks to me very much IOR era, pinched stern, small main, big headsail, could be a handful short handed.

Trisfer 40 --- run , don't walk, don't look back, keep on running. If the broker says EUR25.000, then double it.

CT41 ... don't know, can't tell from the pics but check the tanks and look for leaks. Sailing ability ? I dont' know but I'd have thought slow.

Romaine ... how old is she ? For mine she is the pick of those four boats but that is purely an impression gained from looking at the pics.

Good Luck.
08-01-2011 03:21 PM
lafayette Thanks for the comments, since 1 year I’m looking for a boat to buy with a reasonable price; my first choice was a Jouet 37, very close where I’m going to be in one month.
ISULELLA EST A VENDRE - Le blog de ISULELLA
A you see there is a lot of worked done, and I know this boat is pretty strong construction.

Second choice was a trisfer 40 http://www.oceandream.fr/fiche_detai...11&cat=1&tri=0 , a trimus model, which need to refit totally. Accordingly to the broker it will cost me about 25,000 euros, to be ready to sail. I need to change to steel panels on the trisfer.

Third was a ta chiao CT 41, lovely boat, petites annonces - Nautisme - Vends Voilier 12,50 mètres
Wooden Mats, and the owner have change the mats for an Alum one, eventually the price will be higher.

fourth option was a Romaine, http://voilieralu.e-monsite.com/ , in Aluminum sailing boat.

David l
08-01-2011 03:11 AM
mitiempo SloopJonB

A respected wood boatbuilder like Jespersen in Sidney B.C. (Bent or now his son Eric) would shudder at your suggestion a cold moulded/epoxy boat be included with plastic boats.

The story of the penny and the aluminum boat is a myth that has been told for decades. And the hot marina - In that week how many aluminum saildrives and outboards were destroyed? They have the same issue.

If wired properly and dissimilar metals kept to a minimum (shaft and prop being the only ones necessary) and zinc protected like any boat has to be aluminum has no great issues.
07-31-2011 11:59 PM
tdw Regulars here would know that our old boat is steel, that we have just moved up in size and this time we've gone glass.

LaFayette,
The first thing that strikes me about your proposed purchase is the age. I frankly do not think I would ever consider a 30 year old steeler. Seems to me you are asking for a world of pain. I admit she looks like she has been well looked after, at least from the pics.

Ultimately it does come down to an issue of maintenance. Steel is, without doubt labour intensive. No getting around it.

From a performance perspective at around 42' the weight disadvantage is going to dissipate but even so you will lose a knot or so compared to a similar boat in GRP and while yes Osmosis can be a problem in glass boats it is not an ongoing maintenance issue, as such.

We bought our old girl despite the fact she was steel and we loved her dearly. A desire for a bit more space down below was about the only reason we moved on. The VDS34 happened to be a design I have always admired so I was happy to go metal but I seriously doubt I would ever go steel again.

Final point, steel can often be a very economical alternative to glass providing you are in for the long term as you will of course get less when you eventually do sell.
07-31-2011 11:49 PM
aeventyr60
Quote:
Originally Posted by lafayette View Post
i was reading the review, and i might buy a steel boat for some reason
the fibre glass there is the problem of osmose, then there is the problem to treat the problem.
The repair is a bit more difficult

as for the steel, heavier and more solid construction
Ok i can said, i will lose 1 or 2 knots on sailing.

David
If your really interested in a steel boat, sign up for a welding course at your local community college. Your going to need these skills for a steel boat. Hope you like sanding, grinding, chipping, rust, dust, painting etc. It will be your LIFE for many, many years.
07-31-2011 11:27 PM
SloopJonB
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
I wouldn't go quite as far as SloopJonB.

The main reason most boats are fiberglass is that is the only material that lends itself to series production in molds.

For a one-off custom sailboat both aluminum and modern cold molded wood and epoxy construction is excellent. A cold molded epoxy boat has as little maintenance as fiberglass and no chance of any blisters ever.

My first choice if I was able to afford a custom boat is aluminum. In this area - B.C. - many fishboats, whale watching boats and pleasure boats are welded aluminum and they have few problems and a very long service life. The French produce many aluminum sailboats - Garcia, Alubat, and others - and they are cruising world wide without problems.

Steel though is heavy unless the boat is large and rust protection is a huge issue, especially on an older boat.
I agree about cold moulded wood although if done with epoxy I include it with "plastic" boats. It would be my first choice for a custom boat - finished bright there is nothing so beautiful.

I would be nervous about aluminium though, despite their record as workboats here, due to galvanics. I read a lengthy writeup by the buyer of one of Tom Watsons (IBM) "Palawans". It was built in alloy by a big time Dutch or German yard (A&R??) can't remeber for sure. When he cleaned it out to start the restoration he found major area of the bilge that were nearly perforated like Swiss cheese. After some research and checking he realized that it had been caused by the small bits of copper wire clipped off by the electricians when they wired the boat. One hole, nearly through was caused by an errant penny that ended up in the bilge. I have also heard tales of an alloy boat that was perforated and sank at the dock after only a week in a hot marina.
07-31-2011 09:37 PM
mitiempo I wouldn't go quite as far as SloopJonB.

The main reason most boats are fiberglass is that is the only material that lends itself to series production in molds.

For a one-off custom sailboat both aluminum and modern cold molded wood and epoxy construction is excellent. A cold molded epoxy boat has as little maintenance as fiberglass and no chance of any blisters ever.

My first choice if I was able to afford a custom boat is aluminum. In this area - B.C. - many fishboats, whale watching boats and pleasure boats are welded aluminum and they have few problems and a very long service life. The French produce many aluminum sailboats - Garcia, Alubat, and others - and they are cruising world wide without problems.

Steel though is heavy unless the boat is large and rust protection is a huge issue, especially on an older boat.
07-31-2011 03:57 PM
turbulicity
Quote:
Originally Posted by veprjack View Post
Keeping in mind that I'm a newbie, I have to say that the interior of the 1979 Finot Reve des tropique is amazing! WOW! Since I'm looking for a boat to live aboard on, I was blown away by the comfort, amenities and size! The only thing, and it's fixable/relatively minor, is the lack of a shower down under... Other than that, the boat appears to be a good value. Of course, other posters with more knowledge of things that go beyond cosmetics have already cautioned about rust! So, get a good survey/inspection and don't let the beauty of the interior cloud your judgement!

Best of luck!
Jack
The interior pictures of that boat are deceiving. They are shot with a wide angle lens, exaggerating the size. It is a fairly common trick by boat brokers.
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