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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Galley cutting board
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Thread: Galley cutting board Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-26-2011 01:05 PM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
I prefer my chocolate without the white spots (sugar bloom) that refrigerating it causes. Store it in a cool place.
Yes Sensei.

Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
I have not tried Bamboo, but see it suggested in several places...why don't you be the Guinea pig and let us know in a year how it goes LOL
As you suggest Obiwan.
07-25-2011 07:15 PM
T37Chef Dave,

I have not tried Bamboo, but see it suggested in several places...why don't you be the Guinea pig and let us know in a year how it goes LOL
07-25-2011 06:44 PM
speciald I cut a piece of Starboard to fit over the burners of our Force 10 stove. It fits into the stainless steel frame so it won't slide off. It gives us another 4 sq ft of counter space and serves as a cutting board when we are not using the stove.
07-25-2011 06:18 PM
chef2sail I prefer my chocolate without the white spots (sugar bloom) that refrigerating it causes. Store it in a cool place.

Dave
07-25-2011 10:51 AM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
choose those made of hard maple or plastic
Either of you guys tried bamboo? I'm thinking of giving it a try...

Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
We just returned from Europe and one thing that always leaves an impression on me is how food is stored and handeled...eggs left out for days, cured meats sitting on the counter for days, etc.
Americans will refrigerate anything. I have kept eggs for months (we bought thirteen dozen eggs at Tesco in Plymouth in May 2006 and ate the last in August 2006 with not a bad egg in the batch) without refrigeration. With care mustard, mayonnaise, and ketchup last a very long time in the pantry. The only reason for refrigerating butter is if you want to carve or shave it. On and on. Some thought makes boat refrigerators magically "bigger" because you don't need to put so much in.

Chocolate (I am told) must however be kept in the refrigerator. I always keep room for Janet's stash.
07-25-2011 02:35 AM
chef2sail Ahh the Europens...my mentor (a Fench master Chef) took me to France 3 times. Europeans live to eat and love their foods....Americans for the most part just eat cause they have to. I know its a huge generalization, but It is so apparent when you travel abroad to Europe. Every town in France had a Patissier. Butcher, etc.
07-24-2011 11:24 PM
T37Chef LOL, I think a have a pretty high standard of "kitchen awareness" and based on the information I know, I would say that wood is safer for home use, even more so on a boat, since most don't sanitize with bleach (as you point out) and most boats I know don't have a high temp dishwasher?

Just to be clear, I'm advocating the use of wood in a household situation, not commercial.

In my opinion, this quote from Wikipedia supports my view. "While plastic is theoretically a more sanitary material than wood for cutting boards, testing has shown this may not be the case.[1] The softer surface of plastic boards is scored by knives, and the resulting grooves and cuts in the surface harbour bacteria even after being well washed. However, unlike wood, plastic boards do allow rinsing with harsher cleaning chemicals such as bleach"

"Wood has some advantages over plastic in that it is somewhat self healing; shallow cuts in the wood will close up on their own. Wood also has natural anti-septic properties.[1]"
Cutting board - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

From the FDA website:
"As a rule of thumb, avoid using cutting boards that are made of soft, porous materials. Instead, choose those made of hard maple or plastic, and make sure they are free of cracks and crevices. Smooth surfaces can be cleaned more easily and thoroughly."
Fresh and Frozen Seafood: Selecting and Serving it Safely

Another article(s) favoring wood over plastic, one is an except from the Journal of Food Protection.
http://www.knife-expert.com/cut-bo93.txt
ingentaconnect Cutting Boards of Plastic and Wood Contaminated Experimentally wi...

We just returned from Europe and one thing that always leaves an impression on me is how food is stored and handeled...eggs left out for days, cured meats sitting on the counter for days, etc.
07-24-2011 08:53 PM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
Of course you cant see the bacteria that gets you ill
Generally agreed, except for mold and mildew. You'll note above that I have had tests done (swabs of all the faucets on the boat and of counters and cutting boards) that a lab cultured. My boat is obviously not a commercial facility but I figure the investment in testing every three years, given temperature cycling, hoses on and off board, and unknowns on dock supply water make it a reasonable investment.
07-24-2011 02:50 PM
chef2sail Dave/ Shaun,

Knowing both of you guys personally, I would expect a "higher" quality of kitchen awareness from you both. I do not beleive the average boater takes such precautions.

The key here is that you properly sanitize. So how many people here actually do you think actually spray the boards with a bleach or white vinegar solution after each task.I am still waiting here for more raised hands. I applaud your use of a "sanitizer" and agree about using seperate boards for poultry. Wonder how many people actually do that besides us? Still no other hands...huh..

I would bet the average boat they only wash the boards with soap and water and let air dry. Ill bet also they have only one cutting board also.

Its probably why the FDA demands for no wooden boards in a commercial establishment take place. It is based on what the average person or establish does.

Quote:
Seriously, no visible sign of growth on the boards.
Of course you cant see the bacteria that gets you ill

I will continue to eact anything Dave and Shaun make, not only will the quality be top notch, but it will be safe also. grin...grin

Dave
07-24-2011 12:40 PM
SVAuspicious While it is with some caution that I insert myself between Dave and Shawn *grin* I do much prefer cutting on wood. With all due respect to Dave's citation of government regulation I have found that often that regulation isn't based on scientific data.

A couple of other interesting resources:
Cutting Boards - Equipment & Gear - Cooking For Engineers

Michael's Kitchen: Cutting Boards

While I do run boat cooking tools through a dishwasher in general I work with hand cleaning. A couple of my larger pots don't fit in the sink and my cutting boards (one wood for meat, two for veg & cheese (one wood, one small plastic sometimes used for service) , one wood for bread) certainly don't. My practice--right, wrong, or indifferent--is to use a soapy sponge to wipe down the board and then spray with vinegar water (I have sprayers with vinegar and with bleach under the galley sink).

So far nobody died. *grin*

Seriously, no visible sign of growth on the boards. When I had my water system tested for bacteria we swiped the meat and large veg board -- no meaningful bacteria count.
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