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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > Staying onboard at the bow
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Thread: Staying onboard at the bow Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-08-2011 10:41 AM
Barquito
Quote:
The first thing to do is get rid of the piston hanks on your sail. Piston hanks take two hands to operate and they can get jammed with salt.
That is a good idea. I may be looking into some sail repairs, and will consider that.

BTW, your singlehanding tome is awsome.
08-06-2011 06:49 PM
aeventyr60 Thanks for the info! Looks like an interesting boat to sail. saw a few of these on my voyage in OZ.
Cheers,
Matt
08-06-2011 06:43 AM
St Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by aeventyr60 View Post
Tell us/me more about sailing on this ship!
Hiya Aeventyr

Waitoa is a Thursday Is. Pearling Lugger. I grew up with this gaff ketch. My Dad still has her, but he 'potters' about now. (Basically it needs a crew who know what they are doing)

She is part of the reason I never have had a wooden boat!

I still get to work/crew her of course (& it seems like I am treated like I am still a teenager and have to work the genny, sort the main and mizzen staysail, the topsail if we fly it as well as fetch any drinks etc etc.- all at the same time)

She is a lovely boat and undeniabely has soul. I would never have got the 'bug' to go cruising if not for 'Waitoa' She has been a major part of my family's 'life' for ever. She is moored on the same row as my yacht so Dad checks my yacht, I check 'Waitoa'.

She was built in 1905, rebuilt in 1925 with NZ Kauri.

She saw WW2 war service in what you yanks would call clandestine service as did many luggers. She was pearling until about the mid 1960's.

My Dad rebuilt the main mast, the deck, new cabins, bowsprit, rebuilt engine, gear box. wheel instead of tiller etc etc over the years. I assisted.

We first put a winch and an anchor windlass on about 1990.

My Dad is a tough old school fellow.[what many Ozzies would call a 'bushy'] Like many fathers and sons, we rarely agree on things, but the older I get, the more I respect him. With 'Waitoa' a 25t gaff ketch, he could run rings about many modern tupperware things, as long as there is a bit of breeze.
08-05-2011 09:38 PM
aeventyr60
Quote:
Originally Posted by St Anna View Post
Get your weight low (& you'll learn to use your toes almost dug into the deck). Hank on the tack first and quickly work your way to the head (already with halyard attached)

In reverse, try and have someone to grab the loose sail before it flogs itself or you!

I learnt on the bowsprit on this - there is a large genoa on the end of the bowsprit as well. I learnt a need for a sense of survival at an early age. To say one may get wet up on the bow is an inderstatement. It is cool!

Tell us/me more about sailing on this ship!
08-05-2011 01:27 PM
FoolishMuse The first thing to do is get rid of the piston hanks on your sail. Piston hanks take two hands to operate and they can get jammed with salt.

Switch to Wichard hanks. They only take one hand to clip on or off and they never stick.

This change alone will solve all of your problems. I only use Wichard hanks on my Olson 30 and after some 1,000 sailing days I have NEVER had any of the problems that others claim to have with them.
07-29-2011 02:01 PM
Barquito Just two attachment points a bit aft of the bow on either side would limit your movement to the center if you had two short tethers. The diagram might be over-optomistic showing the range of movement.
07-29-2011 02:11 AM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce:755889
if you have a short teather fixed to a strong point or even two teathers, then your pull in a stance against the hold of the teather will keep you in place. I don't think there is a big divide here, but just a different way that we might use the teather.
Interesting idea. At first thought it sounds tricky to set up and somewhat precarious, but I've never tried it so how would I know.
07-28-2011 11:11 PM
Barquito
Quote:
The OP: Hey, how do I stay safe working right at the forestay?

Everybody: Just clip in, you'll be fine.

Adam: Is that all? At least *one* person suggested using a rigid part of the boat for support.
I agree. That is the problem, the tether keeps you safer up until you get far enough forward that you could go over the lifeline and just hang there. I doubt it would be safer to unclip at the bow, but I realize the tether won't always keep me on the boat that far up.
07-28-2011 10:14 PM
CaptainForce
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
........ Clipping on doesn't keep you in place................
Actually, we are reading, but I think this phrase is where our thoughts diverged. You seem to favor being braced against strong points and being clipped in represents a safeguard that doesn't hold you in place and can even leave you suspended over the rail. You are absolutely right if this is the way you use the teather; however, if you have a short teather fixed to a strong point or even two teathers, then your pull in a stance against the hold of the teather will keep you in place. I don't think there is a big divide here, but just a different way that we might use the teather.
07-28-2011 09:03 PM
AdamLein I didn't advise against clipping on, folks. I said that recommending it isn't helping. The conversation went kind of like this:

The OP: Hey, how do I stay safe working right at the forestay?

Everybody: Just clip in, you'll be fine.

Adam: Is that all? At least *one* person suggested using a rigid part of the boat for support.

Read before you comment, folks. Nowhere do I say not to clip in. I just pointed out that clipping in serves a different purpose than most folks here seems to believe.

The bow of my boat is about two feet wide where I'm kneeling to hank on a jib. Even a short tether is not going to do much to keep me on the deck.

FWIW I'm usually clipped in when out of the cockpit, but only for the reasons I mentioned, not because I believe it will prevent me from falling overboard.
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