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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > storing reefing lines, not rigged
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Thread: storing reefing lines, not rigged Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-14-2011 03:14 AM
Cal28 ok ... trying to understand this more clearly ...

all I can say is ... pictures please?
08-12-2011 01:44 PM
GeorgeB Perhaps I’m not communicating the method Knuterikt and I are using very well. We have a small (1/8 inch Dacron in my case) line that is sewn together with a “pigtail” forming a continuous loop between the reefing cringles. After the first reef is set, we tie the 2nd reefing line to the “pigtail” (my reef lines are finished in a Flemish loop). We then hoist the 2nd reefing line up through the higher cringle like one would hoist a burgee on a flag halyard. We keep “hoisting” until the line is through the 2nd cringle and back down to the boom where we re-tie the line around the boom and are ready to go to the 2nd reef whenever we need to. When in 2nd reef, I can untie my first reef line and use it for my 3rd reef using the same technique. It is pretty simple and easy and takes little more time than it does to read this description. I may be a giant amongst sailnetters, but in real life I’m only six feet which is tall enough to reach my boom and my tag line.
08-12-2011 01:10 PM
knuterikt
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquorice View Post
Not sure how practical this is, as I've never tried it:
Some time ago I read an article about a reefing setup where the guy had one line and a s/s hook with an eye welded to it.
the hook was lifted to the cringles by putting the eye on a boat hook and dropping the hook into the reefing cringles. That way, only one reefing line; the line doesn't have to be reaved through the cringle; use the same hook and line for each reef!
(there's going to be some flapping of Dacron, I think, when moving from reef 1 to reef 2)
This solution give a 1:1 purchase when reefing, if the winch can handle the load it should work.

Think I whould have tied the first reef in after pulling in, that way the hook will be ready for the next also.
08-12-2011 11:10 AM
Liquorice Not sure how practical this is, as I've never tried it:
Some time ago I read an article about a reefing setup where the guy had one line and a s/s hook with an eye welded to it.
the hook was lifted to the cringles by putting the eye on a boat hook and dropping the hook into the reefing cringles. That way, only one reefing line; the line doesn't have to be reaved through the cringle; use the same hook and line for each reef!
(there's going to be some flapping of Dacron, I think, when moving from reef 1 to reef 2)
08-12-2011 10:54 AM
SVAuspicious
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
For me, it is no big deal to reeve it while under sail. I do it after the first reef is set and the main is trimmed. I have no problem standing on the leeward weather deck and reaching up to tie a knot.
You'd have to be 10 feet tall to reach the second reef cringle 12 feet off the deck AFTER the first reef is in on my boat. It simply isn't realistic to reeve reefing lines on a good-sized offshore boat if the reefs are at all deep.
08-11-2011 08:12 PM
GeorgeB I’m pretty old school and like the security of a knot. Besides, on my 34 footer, I run 3/8 inch reefing lines (sta-set) so the weight savings would be minimal unless I went to something like ¼ inch (way to small for my liking!). It has been my experience that conditions rarely deteriorate so rapidly that you would need to go from full hoist to double or triple reef in a couple of hours so why have the 2nd reef reeved all the time where all it is doing is flogging the leach of that tape drive sail? When conditions warrant, I’ll reeve the 2nd reef while still at the dock. For me, it is no big deal to reeve it while under sail. I do it after the first reef is set and the main is trimmed. I have no problem standing on the leeward weather deck and reaching up to tie a knot.
08-11-2011 07:06 PM
knuterikt
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
The only thing I disagree with Knuterikt is I think dyneema is too slippery to effectively hold a knot so I would keep the covers on. Besides, unless you are looking for less weight aloft, something like Sta-set will satisfy the creep and stretch needs of a reefing line.
If knots in the uncovered dyneema is an issue this could be solved with an eye splice in the end combined with a softshackle
08-11-2011 06:54 PM
arf145 We've got two reefs rigged at all times. I prefer to have them ready to go even though we only sail in the Chesapeake because we need that 2nd reef over 20knots. Different boats, different needs. But if your boat needs a reef in the kinds of conditions that can come up in your locale, I think reefing lines are no good unless they are already there.

To keep the lines from interfering with sail shape (such as it is with our old sack of a main! ) we pull some slack in the reef lines back at the leech.
08-11-2011 03:55 PM
GeorgeB I’m with Knuterikt. I usually leave a stopper knot in my reef #2 line and keep it on the boom. I too, have a “tag line” with a “pig tail” reeved on a continuous loop between reef 1 and 2 cringles. My reef lines are finished with Flemish eyes so it is very easy to reeve the 2nd reef line while under way. If I have to go the reef #3, I untie reef #1 line and re-reeve it using the reef 2 and 3 tag line. The only thing I disagree with Knuterikt is I think dyneema is too slippery to effectively hold a knot so I would keep the covers on. Besides, unless you are looking for less weight aloft, something like Sta-set will satisfy the creep and stretch needs of a reefing line.
08-11-2011 03:06 PM
SVAuspicious In my experience if it isn't already reeved when you need it then it is too late. Boat is bouncing, boom is swinging, something else is going wrong - not good. Don't invest much energy into the ability to reeve late in the game. Near home if you want to stow the reefing lines that's fine. In fact that is what I do. Don't kid yourself you'll be able to re-rig.

Offshore I leave all three reefs fully rigged no matter how light the air is.
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