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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Chartering > In order to bareboat charter...
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Thread: In order to bareboat charter... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-08-2011 05:24 AM
Patient With the Moorings, once you make an account on their website, there is a section to fill in a sailing "resume". You can do that now to get an idea of what they are looking for.

I skippered a 40' Bene with them 2 years ago when I was only 30. I was the youngest captain at the skipper's meeting thats for sure. Never the less, I submitted my resume online and also faxed all my US Sailing certifications along with my US Sailing member ID that they can look up in their database. After they verified my certs, I was never asked about sailing capability again.

Something funny regarding credentials. Back in the 80s when the Moorings first hit the scene, my dad who had sailed all his life was asked to take a sailing dingy out with a Moorings staff member to verify he knew what he was doing, along with a written test. We were bareboating as a family which wasnt as mainstream back then. I think that was their way of verifying bareboat applicants back then. Considering how easy it is to get through the gate nowadays, part of me wished they did that today as well. I ran into a lot of captains that had absolutely no idea what they were doing, to the point of endangering their crew and others.

Short version. You will be fine and better equipped than most that qualify.

PS: The most important advice I would give you would be to attend the skippers meeting, ask questions and absolutely make sure to listen and ask questions during your boat's walkthrough with staff.
10-08-2011 02:42 AM
bacampbe I've been on 4 charters now--3 with The Moorings (BVIx2 and Abacos) and 1 with TMM (Grenadines). All 4 had stack-packs. Of the 4, only 1 would drop all the way into the lazy-bag head-to-wind without someone going forward to pull down the last third or so.

Basically, you can expect a stack-pack, or maybe even roller furling. But, with the economy of the last few years, what you can't expect is good maintenance. (Don't get me wrong--most were great boats in relatively good shape. But this particular item seems to be a maintenance problem)

And as annoying as a poorly maintained classic main/stack pack may be, I can only imagine a poorly maintained roller-furling main would be like. (Full disclosure--_my_ boat has a furling main. It's great if you are used to it, but I can't imagine a typical charter captain failing to FUBAR it.)
10-04-2011 02:40 PM
Equitas Oh wow. Didn't realize that bareboat chartering was that easy!!.

We've got a week with RCI timeshares, so I think the next thing we'll be doing is an RCI captained boat for a week.

Has anyone done this before? if so, what suggestions can you make? where to go from, which company to use / avoid. etc..
10-04-2011 02:25 PM
SeaDreamer1Day
Stack Pack

The Stack Pack sure looks handy. That is a nice setup.
10-04-2011 12:28 PM
Tim R. Every boat I have ever chartered in Caribbean(Moorings, Sunsail, private) had a stack pack and the main simply fell into the pack(once upwind) as the lazy jacks guided it down and we zipped it closed. Don't worry about reefing. Use only the head sail when you feel you need to reef. Keep it fun and easy.

Graphic courtesy of Doyle sails:
10-04-2011 12:03 PM
FarCry No worries. I got a chuckle out of it and hoped you would too.
10-04-2011 11:51 AM
DRFerron
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarCry View Post
I've never had much luck folding the sail against the mast and have taken the easier route of just letting gravity put it on the boom instead.
Good catch, thanks. And I was probably sober, too.
10-04-2011 11:43 AM
FarCry
Quote:
Originally Posted by DRFerron View Post
The hardest part I've found is completely lowering the main underway and folding it down on top of the mast.

Center the main. Heading into the wind helps so that the main flutters and the tension is released. Have the helmsman put the boat in neutral or if you must go forward, go as slowly as possible. The helmsman should keep a lookout and alert whoever is lowering the main to any approaching wakes so he or she isn't knocked off balance and if the boat has to turn into a large wake (which means the wind will fill in the sail). When going on deck, don't forget the sail ties. If just reefing the sail this will be when you tie the reefing lines (if equipped) rather than take it all the way down. Some boats are equipped with a hook that attaches to the leading edge of the sail to keep it in position while you tie the lines.

It's easier to reef the main before raising it completely. If you know that the wind is strong before leaving the mooring/anchorage/dock, tie the reefing lines before you leave.

I've never had much luck folding the sail against the mast and have taken the easier route of just letting gravity put it on the boom instead.

Back to Ninefingers. There are many monohull sailboats in the Virgin Islands area that have have furling mains. The ones with conventional mains pretty much all have sailbags and lazyjacks on the boom. Many you don't have to even leave the cockpit to raise or lower the main. Either way it's not hard to do after seeing it done once. As Drferron says, just make sure you are into the wind, especially with full battens and lazyjacks.
10-03-2011 10:06 PM
NortenoSailor When I first chartered in the Caribbean, my sailing resume was even skinnier than Equitas', but I was still allowed to charter (Sunsail)
10-03-2011 06:51 PM
DRFerron
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninefingers View Post
Although here's a question. And this will surely wrinkle a few feathers, lol! I have only used a furling main. How hard will it be to learn to raise and reef a traditional sail? From the looks of it, most charter boats have traditional mains.
The hardest part I've found is completely lowering the main underway and folding it down on top of the boom.

Center the main. Heading into the wind helps so that the main flutters and the tension is released. Have the helmsman put the boat in neutral or if you must go forward, go as slowly as possible. The helmsman should keep a lookout and alert whoever is lowering the main to any approaching wakes so he or she isn't knocked off balance and if the boat has to turn into a large wake (which means the wind will fill in the sail). When going on deck, don't forget the sail ties. If just reefing the sail this will be when you tie the reefing lines (if equipped) rather than take it all the way down. Some boats are equipped with a hook that attaches to the leading edge of the sail to keep it in position while you tie the lines.

It's easier to reef the main before raising it completely. If you know that the wind is strong before leaving the mooring/anchorage/dock, tie the reefing lines before you leave.
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