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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > How much human damage can you expect in a crash
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Thread: How much human damage can you expect in a crash Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-01-2011 11:22 AM
smurphny
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool View Post
A factor in how the impact affects the crew is the shape of the keel. Most of my experience striking rocks was racing a C&C 30, which is a model with a swept-back lead keel. This keel shape unfortunately went out of favor in the late '70s, being replaced by keels with more vertical leading edges.

When the C&C 30 hit something, the bow would dive and the stern raise as the boat tripped over the obstacle, then we were past it and still sailing, having lost little speed. Damage would be limited to a divot in the leading edge of the keel. No injuries.

If you sail (or race - making cutting corners more likely) where rocks are common, the design and construction of the older boats such as the first and second generation C&Cs, can be a good way to go.
True indeed as evidenced by my post previously above. My old A-35, with a sloped leading edge was forced up and over whatever I hit. This has always been a positive aspect of this kind of hull shape, especially when slowly picking ones way through bars or coral where occasional grounding is a given. Winged and vertical keels tend to hang up whereas sloped do not. It's something to consider when choosing a cruising boat as opposed to a faster and more modern racing hull.
12-01-2011 11:12 AM
Rozz i ended up with broken glass and red wine all over my white upholstry when we hit a sand bar at about 4-5knts. was first time my friend drove, took him another outting to take the helm again lol
glad to report, just pide was hurt

positive note, was a good time to fire up the bbq for dinner and wait for the tide to rise :-}
12-01-2011 10:28 AM
sailingfool A factor in how the impact affects the crew is the shape of the keel. Most of my experience striking rocks was racing a C&C 30, which is a model with a swept-back lead keel. This keel shape unfortunately went out of favor in the late '70s, being replaced by keels with more vertical leading edges.

When the C&C 30 hit something, the bow would dive and the stern raise as the boat tripped over the obstacle, then we were past it and still sailing, having lost little speed. Damage would be limited to a divot in the leading edge of the keel. No injuries.

If you sail (or race - making cutting corners more likely) where rocks are common, the design and construction of the older boats such as the first and second generation C&Cs, can be a good way to go.
11-30-2011 08:15 PM
beachmont I came to abrupt stop one time threw me five feet hit bulkhead and it hurt
11-30-2011 07:38 PM
INMA I ran aground.

A crew member fell through the hatch landing on the cabin floor, no harm but she just missed the hatch lock fitting which was sharp and could have caused a serious cut.

My guess is falling on objects and stuff moving are serious risks when they cause point impacts or cuts.
10-07-2011 05:57 PM
smurphny I hit either the buoy weight or a rock while in the channel two years ago on Lake Champlain. The lake was very low and I should have been moving slower and given the buoy more room but hindsight is 20/20. I was doing 6 knots. The boat did not stop but felt as if I had just gone over a sand bar maybe or a submerged log. I felt it go up and back down, stopped, checked the bilge, saw no water, and continued on. It was not until I hauled out for the winter a few weeks later that I noticed a good sized gouge on the front of the keel. I gotta say that laying on your back and feathering out 1.5" of glass around 16" is no fun. Not a tremendously complicated job but had to wait until spring when the hull was bone dry. Working overhead with West Epoxy is also a challenge and invariably a sticky mess. Luckily I discovered another really lousy, quick repair done in the same spot that got fixed in the process. My Alberg is an internal ballast type deep keel which, I guess, is pretty tough.
10-07-2011 04:17 PM
Maine Sail Perhaps the best video of boats hitting the rocks while racing. Check out the last boat. A guy is launched off the bow and as the boat comes off the rock a crew member casually reaches and hand out and scoops him back on board.....

TR2009 - YouTube

http://youtu.be/z1s4qoYKCqM
10-07-2011 08:42 AM
tommays
More dammage than you could believe


It cost
10-06-2011 09:11 PM
jrd22 I'm not admitting anything, OK? But I have it on good authority that when a 34' sailboat going 5.5K hits a rock (say somewhere near Roche Harbor, WA) if someone is standing facing aft in the cabin they can be thrown down the two steps to the galley area faster than they can even think about it. Yes, there could be broken bones, or necks (in the hypothetical example I gave above nothing but large bruises would have occurred).
10-06-2011 07:07 PM
eherlihy Here is a thread on the story that I mentioned above; http://www.sailnet.com/forums/genera...n-sinking.html
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