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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Uh Oh.....This may be a deal breaker....
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Thread: Uh Oh.....This may be a deal breaker.... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-26-2011 11:49 PM
NewportNewbie
Quote:
Originally Posted by WDSchock View Post
Newport,


Sounds as if you do know how to manipulate sails to depower - good !

In waves/chop one can steer to reduce the pitching and amount of spary coming over the bow by working the tiller plus/minus 3-7 degrees.

Upwind - steer diagonally up the wave face and then straight down the back of the wave.
Thanks! I will try that next time I'm out there. I was going through them somewhat straight.
10-26-2011 10:20 PM
WDS123 Newport,


Sounds as if you do know how to manipulate sails to depower - good !

In waves/chop one can steer to reduce the pitching and amount of spary coming over the bow by working the tiller plus/minus 3-7 degrees.

Upwind - steer diagonally up the wave face and then straight down the back of the wave.
10-26-2011 07:05 PM
apogee1mars
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Gazelle is for sale (2008 Gunboat 66 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com).

Anybody wanna go in as partners?

Don't most large cat's end up upside down floating around in the Sargasso Sea eventually?
10-26-2011 06:51 PM
TakeFive
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewportNewbie View Post
...The heel angle isn't at all the issue...it was the up and down motion of the bot over and through the waves. Like I said it was a tad bit choppy. I asked her if it was the angle and even adjusted the boat so there was less heel through the traveler, but she insisted it wasn't the heel angle, it was the up and down...
OK, sounds like you know how to avoid overpowering. I'll leave my post up anyway since others look here for advice also.

I hae one other comment that might be helpful to you or others. I had to add 300 lb of ballast in the bow of my little boat to make her sail on her lines. This fixed a hatch leak (since the the hatched was designed for rainwater to drain forward off the foredeck), greatly improved visibility (since the bow was lower), and reduced weather helm (since the mast was raked less). One unanticipated improvement was that it greatly reduced hobby horsing.

300 lb. may not be much for a boat your size - my boat is known to be a lightweight design. But some additional ballast in both the bow and stern (balanced to keep her on her lines) would increase the moment of inertia of your boat, and might reduce hobby horsing for you. However, you should consult other owners of your boat to compare notes on what's safe and effective for your particular boat.
10-26-2011 06:35 PM
NewportNewbie This for the advice...The heel angle isn't at all the issue...it was the up and down motion of the bot over and through the waves. Like I said it was a tad bit choppy. I asked her if it was the angle and even adjusted the boat so there was less heel through the traveler, but she insisted it wasn't the heel angle, it was the up and down. She said she wasn't scared and wasn't worried, she just had to hold on too much for her liking. We looked at a few ads for newer/bigger boats and when it was all said and done she didn't see anything that compelled her to want one more than the boat we have. So I will take her out early in light winds...and save the choppy stuff for the fellas.
10-26-2011 04:53 PM
TakeFive I have a buddy who really thinks he know how to sail. He rents a daysailer once every year or so when vacationing at Martha's Vineyard. He mostly singlehands because his wife refuses to get on a boat with him.

First time we invited them on our boat, I learned why she refuses to sail with him. (She agreed to come this time because he wasn't the skipper.) He first complained that the we were wimps for reefing, so we shook it out to accommodate him. Later, every time I looked away, he was pulling on the mainsheet to trim the main as tight as he could get it, even though we were on a reach. He got the boat up to about 40 degrees heel (and much less than hull speed) before I ordered him to keep hands off the sheets and let my wife do it.

A year later we went out together because my wife was out of town and I needed crew. He did the same thing again, and didn't want to reef for the conditions, arguing that "we would lose power." I told him that once we hit hull speed, any extra power was wasted on turbulence and dragging the hull form down in the water. I also told him my hull design is made to sail optimally at 15 degrees, and heeling beyond that pushes the belly of the beam down into the water (more drag), as well as having to constantly fight the rudder to prevent rounding up (more drag again). I reefed, loosened the sail trim, got the boat back to 15 degrees, and increased our speed by 1/2 knot with a much more comfortable ride and no weather helm.

In retrospect, it seems this guy is used to sailing planing boats, and knows nothing about the limitations of displacement boats.

I don't know how much the OP knows about his own boat, but it sounds like he might be overpowering his boat, which generates an uncomfortable ride, disgruntled crew, potentially dangerous conditions, and will still not succeed at exceeding hull speed.

A bigger boat is harder to overpower, but it's an expensive way to solve a problem that might be more easily solved through refining your sailing skills.
10-26-2011 04:22 PM
hellosailor "I am really trying hard to figure out a way that she can get into it more."
I suppose a ketamine martini would be politically incorrect?

Sounds like you'd best keep sailing with the boys and take the missus out only on windless days with flat water. Unless she really means, the chop is making her seasick, in which case there are often remedies.
10-26-2011 01:42 PM
Ninefingers Hey Newport, before you do anything hasty, may I suggest something, well...less hasty

Have you thought about joining Sailtime for a year before you decide on another boat? The base at Newport has 33, 36, 38, and 44 foot Hunters, all virtually new. If your wife can't fall in love with sailing after a season on of those, your probably out of luck.

There is one in Newport:

Newport Beach Sailing at SailTime Orange County
10-26-2011 01:25 PM
MarkSF If you do change boats, get a nice classic cruiser like this :

1983 Bristol 38.8 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

You won't believe how much more sea-kindly they are.
10-26-2011 01:15 PM
svHyLyte
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewportNewbie View Post
So the wife doesn't want to get out of sailing. She wants to look at a 35 ft Beneteau and wonders if that will be a smoother sailing boat. I also wonder if i can still easily singlehand it like I can this one.
We sailed a Cal 2-29 out of Alamitos Bay YC for years--and years. All over heck's half acre. And more than once took a butt kicking trying to make it back up-wind to Long Beach from Dana Point or Newport. We later brought the boat here to SW Florida. My wife was always game. We bought our First 42 in the fall of 2001 and took delivery in January 2002. The difference in the boats is/was major. While on our first trip on the "big" boat we got into some butt-kicking weather. My wife was so much more calm that I commented on it and she confided that on the Cal she always felt fearful, even in fair weather but on the First she felt very safe because she wasn't "so close to the water". Now she does about all of the "driving" when the auto-pilot is not and I handle the physical labor and she's very happy and confident. No guaranty but you may find the same with your wife.

Mine:
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