SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Large old wooden sail boat,
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Large old wooden sail boat, Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
10-30-2011 09:04 PM
WanderingStar We brought WS home about half ocean and half ICW. We started off shore but about 200 miles north and 80 miles out the forecast turned bad. By the time we reached the inlet the breeze was NE 40kts. We spent the next 5 days steaming north in wind and rain of an early tropical depression, anchoring each night. We went back out at Charleston, had our nicest day off Cape Hatteras, stopped overnight for fuel at Cape May. A day later we passed under the Verrazano Narrows Bridge into NY Harbor. That afternoon we tied up at home in Mt. Sinai. 14 days, tired, but successful. I recruited some crew on sailnet. I can certainly help you partway, as far as Cape May would be no hardship on me, easy to get home. Anywhere on LI or NYC too. Beyond that my wife would miss me too much. (I think!)
10-30-2011 11:51 AM
wooden
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalebD View Post
Wow. That is quite a saga. I thought I was obsessed with my boat...
First of all, congratulations on making the progress with Senorita that you have done.

I can't comment on what kind of sailing you might find on the Mississippi near Memphis. I sail in a smaller river (Hudson, in NY) and we had a ton of flotsam in our river from the rains of 2 tropical storms this year. I imagine that flotsam is a way of life on the Mississippi. I'm certain you will have stronger currents in the Miss. as well.

Recreational boaters often use the Tenn-Tom waterway to avoid the bottom of the Miss.
Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway Inland Shipping Transportation
I'm not sure about your air or water draft for taking that route though.

As a first step I'd suggest considering moving Senorita down the the lower Chesapeake, perhaps the Deltaville, VA area, as it is warmer and likely cheaper then keeping her in NY.

I'll also suggest that you check out the wooden boat forum: The WoodenBoat Forum
which, as you might imagine is mostly about wooden boats and has a slightly more international membership (then sailnet).

Cheers.
Thanks for the link to the tenn/tom water way it looks interesting.
10-29-2011 11:01 PM
wooden
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
Fantastic. I second the suggestion about the woodenBoat forum, though you seem to know what you're doing. I believe we met once briefly. My wife and I were walking through the boatyards at Greenport a few years ago. You and your wife were working on boat parts on shore, hurrying to finish before rain started. I was interested in your boat (I'm a wooden boat guy too), and you kindly answered a few questions. I live on Long Island, I'd be interested to meet you and see your boat. I'm willing to check on her or other errands if I can assist you. If you want assistance bringing her (partway) home, I'm retired with plenty of sailing experience. I brought my own boat home from Florida.
Thank you, so many people have stopped by over the years, it's hard to keep track of who's who. I will keep your kind offer of help in mind. We plan on sailing her in the Spring, who knows I may well need an extra pair of hands. Did you bring your boat up from Florida on the intercoastal waterway?
10-29-2011 10:31 PM
WanderingStar Fantastic. I second the suggestion about the woodenBoat forum, though you seem to know what you're doing. I believe we met once briefly. My wife and I were walking through the boatyards at Greenport a few years ago. You and your wife were working on boat parts on shore, hurrying to finish before rain started. I was interested in your boat (I'm a wooden boat guy too), and you kindly answered a few questions. I live on Long Island, I'd be interested to meet you and see your boat. I'm willing to check on her or other errands if I can assist you. If you want assistance bringing her (partway) home, I'm retired with plenty of sailing experience. I brought my own boat home from Florida.
10-29-2011 09:17 PM
b40Ibis um not sure of all the details, but either way you move her (by land or sea) will be expensive. For instance does the motor work? If not by sea would not be an option.
We paid 5k to move our boat otr 1200 miles from ME to SC. This was a 40'er <12' wide.
It mat be better to leave her where is and use that $ for travel to and fro.
That's a beautiful boat, are there more photos?
10-29-2011 06:04 PM
SloopSlave I worked the western river system including the Mississippi 30 years ago. There are no locks and dams on the lower, and I don't recall any hazards that would cause you a problem. I'm sure you are aware of the river traffic, but other than that you just need stamina. Good luck and best wishes.
10-29-2011 05:03 PM
CalebD Wow. That is quite a saga. I thought I was obsessed with my boat...
First of all, congratulations on making the progress with Senorita that you have done.

I can't comment on what kind of sailing you might find on the Mississippi near Memphis. I sail in a smaller river (Hudson, in NY) and we had a ton of flotsam in our river from the rains of 2 tropical storms this year. I imagine that flotsam is a way of life on the Mississippi. I'm certain you will have stronger currents in the Miss. as well.

Recreational boaters often use the Tenn-Tom waterway to avoid the bottom of the Miss.
Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway Inland Shipping Transportation
I'm not sure about your air or water draft for taking that route though.

As a first step I'd suggest considering moving Senorita down the the lower Chesapeake, perhaps the Deltaville, VA area, as it is warmer and likely cheaper then keeping her in NY.

I'll also suggest that you check out the wooden boat forum: The WoodenBoat Forum
which, as you might imagine is mostly about wooden boats and has a slightly more international membership (then sailnet).

Cheers.
10-29-2011 02:09 PM
paul323 Poor old girl - she has had a rough time of it. Well done taking her on. A more worthwhile project is difficult to imagine!
10-29-2011 02:06 PM
wooden Attachment 9244

Attachment 9245

Attachment 9246
10-29-2011 02:01 PM
wooden Hi Thank you all for the response, I have been asked loads of questions so I will try and answer some of them. The boat's name is Senorita. She was built in Dartmouth, England by Philip and Son Ltd. in 1925. I do not have a designer, but she was built alongside Tern IV, which was built for Claud Worth. Much of the design and construction, including many of the custom made metal fittings are the same and are mentioned Claud Worth's books. She was originally a gaff-rigged Cutter and converted in 1937 by Philip and Son to a ketch. I have yet to fit the mizzen. She is built of double 4 inch sawn english oak frames with teak planking and external lead ballast. She has wrought iron floor straps spaced about 18 inches apart to support the keel. My wife and I discovered the boat in a magazine abandoned in a yard in Greenport, New York. We were living in California at the time but decided to take a look at the boat. She was a real basket case. The planking was literally falling off of her, most of the deck beams had rotted. The clamp/beam shelf was non existent for 3/4 of the boat. She had no mast and had been gutted. I guess as me ad my wife are both originally from England, we felt drawn to her. So we packed up everything in California and moved to New York to save her. It has taken about five years to get to this point and this year we stepped the mast after replacing th top 20 foot of it, and refitted the Leyland engine that I had rebuilt. She is now floating nicely and takes virtually no water. Along the way, we bought a house in Arkansas and would like to be able to spend some more time there. Being continuous 1500 miles away from home is no fun!So now that the boat ids able to make a passage it would be great if we could get her closer to home for a year or so so that I could continue with the work and spend some time at home. After driving over some of the huge rivers like the Mississippi I was just wondering if it would be possible to find somewhere. I know that there is a marina in Memphis, but I don't know anything about the river. Without the top mast the rig is quite short. I am experienced enough to know not to leave the boat out of the water for any length of time, and would rather not put her through the ordeal of road transport, plus pulling the mast is a big job. As somebody mentioned about dreamers, try camping on an empty boat on hard standing for a New York winter, with little more to sit on than a tool box for a dream. Keep the suggestions coming. I will post a picture of her before she came to the US in 1973.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:26 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.