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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > What would you do?
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: What would you do? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-15-2012 10:47 PM
drakeParagon
Re: What would you do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowedtoothdoc View Post
Yep, You are correct, Bella Luna is a Swan 48. Sounds like they just barely made it in to Charleston.
I interviewed captain AJ Smith from Swan 48 Bella Luna shortly after he arrived in Charleston....

12-19-2011 09:45 AM
smurphny I seriously considered doing away with the roller when replacing rigging. I sail primarily single-handed and considering the extra steps in dealing with hank-on headsails, decided to leave the roller. I realize the roller is prone to jamming but weighing that against getting up to the bow while the boat steers itself, dragging the tether along, trying to avoid the sail going in the water on the way down, trying to tie it off along the lifeline, etc. decided to leave the roller. Not getting caught with too big a sail BEFORE you need a smaller one to me is the important step. Just the wind resistance and weight of the ROLLED 160% genny is an issue. With the simplicity of rollers, I don't see how the thing could jam so bad that it could not be rolled in at the bow by hand once the sail was luffing. I have done this after getting the spool jammed. With a 100% working jib, a few turns essentially turns it into a storm jib as well. I also would like to have a removable inner stay for a small storm sail. It's on the to-do list. In-boom/mast systems are something else. They are not readily accessible. I watched a guy a couple of years ago with a really expensive in-mast rig get it hopelessly jammed and have to call for assistance.
12-18-2011 10:29 PM
vega1860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowedtoothdoc View Post
No efforts could un furl, furl, or drop sail. We had to hove to and wait for the rig to fail...
And that, friends and neighbors, is why Lealea still has hanked on sails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
I have thought about this also. If it happens, you will just need to deal with it. I think the roller safety aspects out weigh a hank on jib safety issues in heavy seas. I think you just need to pick the worse of two evils. Seeing all single handed non stop round the world racing sailors use rollers says a lot for their safety. I think if maintained well, they have excellant reliability record. I would not give up my roller for a hank on. I think I can deal with any failure of the systems that I might encounter. Although I would like to add an inner forestay that I can use with a hank on jib if the roller fails me.
I disagree. (Not that I am right or anything, just my opinion)

Your choice, of course. For myself I would not bet my life on it and that is what you are doing. I suppose it is fine on a race boat with a large professional crew. For middle aged Mom and Pop Rose, however, in their little old cruiser, the old fashioned way is best. And imagine an inexperienced cruising couple caught in a blow when the roller gets stuck or blows out

Mama won't be going cruising no more

But then, MY crew actually likes working on the foredeck in waist deep white water
12-18-2011 07:40 AM
brokesailor Bold Sailor: Are you the fireman or the other crew? I heard something about also a Vietnam vet? Song arrived safely in St Martin last Weds. Lots of electrical gremlins. The Wind instrument, GPS failed shortly after we got underway.
12-17-2011 05:39 PM
MedSailor Locked themselves in the V-berth clutching the Epirb?

I would simply have the crew go to sleep....



Mesailor
12-09-2011 02:54 PM
BoldSailor At the time it was the right thing to do. 3 serious events in less than two hours, one crew injured, conditions getting worse. I believe we were all expecting to not have a boat left by the time the Coast Guard arrived.
What solved our dilemma was helm folks paying strict attention to the approaching waves and aligning the boat appropriately. Plus the addition of a second drogue which stopped the surfing action. 100' of manila rope with about 80' of chain, one of these on each primary winch, through the stern chocks.
There was no communications available once we went over. We could have turned the units off once things stabilized, which would have saved the CG a bit of flying time, but they were already enroute. and I'm not sure anyone was aware you could turn the danged things off. Things were kind of busy too, between steering, making up the other drogue, and the mess below, time went by pretty fast.
I'd be interested in talking to Elle's crew and see what their conditions were. Sounds similar, but they proceeded to abandon ship.
Our remaining days at sea were damned uncomfortable, but we did bring her in.
12-07-2011 05:05 PM
jameswilson29
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldSailor View Post
It seems there is a direct correlation between fishin' stories and sailin' stories. At least it opened a good line of comment for the forum...Not as interesting or controversial, but true nonetheless.
I was there.
So, now that your feet are dry again, do you believe that the EPIRB was activated prematurely and unnecessarily, given that everything turned out fine without any outside help?
12-07-2011 03:47 PM
smurphny Have a couple of GPS units that read out speed over ground. The difference with the more mechanical units such as the old one is that they measure speed through water and are really backups in case you need to go to DR navigation, calculating offsets for current and wind to get a course made good and actually reading a compass. DR instruments make me remember the days of, "Geez, what buoy is that!
12-07-2011 01:41 PM
casey1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
That is a really nice little unit. I have a Polar bike watch that looks suspiciously similar and also is wireless. Am wondering if the Speedwatch sending unit could be used with the watch.

That's pretty scary that you had the same experience with one of these things popping out! They were pretty much standard equipment on boats of late 60s/70s vintage. When you look at the "plug," it's held in by a only a small pin going into plastic. I think I'm going to see if I can perhaps design a backup method of securing the plug to stop it from coming out completely if the pin ever fails. If not, it's getting permanently glued in with epoxy. It's too old to ever get a replacement anyway.
I've seen good reviews of this, and nothing to mount, apparently works by highly accurate/ updated gps.
Velocitek Speedpuck Speed Puck W/O Speedplay - SPEEDPUCK - BoatersWorld.com
http://www.sailingproshop.com/Produc...Puck__VSP.aspx
12-07-2011 01:38 PM
casey1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
That is a really nice little unit. I have a Polar bike watch that looks suspiciously similar and also is wireless. Am wondering if the Speedwatch sending unit could be used with the watch.

That's pretty scary that you had the same experience with one of these things popping out! They were pretty much standard equipment on boats of late 60s/70s vintage. When you look at the "plug," it's held in by a only a small pin going into plastic. I think I'm going to see if I can perhaps design a backup method of securing the plug to stop it from coming out completely if the pin ever fails. If not, it's getting permanently glued in with epoxy. It's too old to ever get a replacement anyway.
I've got one of those through hull knot meter senders also. Next haul out I'm pulling it all out and glass the hole over.
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