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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction > How does one reinforce bulkheads?
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Thread: How does one reinforce bulkheads? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-08-2012 02:37 AM
peterchech
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
A properly tabbed bulkhead has either foam or a gap between the actual bulkhead and the hull and is heavily tabbed. It shouldn't flex any more than the hull itself flexes.

If the bulkhead is tabbed lightly or in only a few places it is not strong enough.
Thanks for the informative post! Interesting, since I have built several stitch and glue boats and have always tabbed directly to the hull, but with a thickened epoxy fillet covered by the glass. I am surprised that the bulkheads in my boat seem to be simply glassed with roving, and no epoxy fillet. I recently retabbed the galley furniture to the hull (it was cracked and loose) with an epoxy fillet and two layers of 10 oz glass cut as a "tape" with about 4 inches overlap per side and it is pretty solid now.

As far as reefing the furling jib goes, I always move the jib cars when I reef. But this is only effective up to maybe 15 or 20% reefed before it turns into a parachute. I am either going to add a solent stay in the spring, or just take out the furler altogether. I need a new jib anyway. Btw my jib is I think a 110.
01-05-2012 11:13 AM
ottos
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
It is a 1981 hunter 25, cherubini designed, with shoal draft keel. I am actually very fond of the boat, even though it is not as sturdily built as some other brands (I can see sunlight through the glass in some of the upper parts of the hull).
The only thing I might contribute to this discussion, is that you shouldn't sell your boat short. The Cherubini Hunters have a very good reputation.
12-31-2011 04:59 AM
L124C
Say what?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sfchallenger View Post
Well I have a furler (came with the boat), but it works with my hanked on sails. I have a 110 jib that is appropriate for winter conditions and a #3 that I use in the summer on the bay. Furling is not reefing, and while I have jib cars that adjust from the cockpit, I would strongly advocate a sail change over a furled reef. So many problems can arise with the lack of ability to reduce sail area in a hurry that I don't see a reason to risk it.
I'm assuming this post was in response to mine. It makes little sense to me so I want to respond. "Furling is not reefing", but you would advocate a sail change over a "furled reef"? Though you are technically correct, as I think you just confirmed, the term reefing a Head sail is used to describe partially furling it, as opposed to furling it completely.
Your jib cars are adjusable from the cockpit, yet you think it's safer to go on the fore deck to perform a sail change?
You're concerned about reducing sail area in a hurry? I can single handedly partially (aka reef), or completely furl my head sail in less than a minute. I'd like to see someone douse and set a new head sail in that amount of time. Now...Is a reefed Headsail as efficient as a properly sized hanked on sail? Absoulutely not (IMHO). Maybe we can agree there!
Once again, off topic, but I couldn't let these comments go.
12-30-2011 05:55 PM
mitiempo A properly tabbed bulkhead has either foam or a gap between the actual bulkhead and the hull and is heavily tabbed. It shouldn't flex any more than the hull itself flexes.

If the bulkhead is tabbed lightly or in only a few places it is not strong enough.
12-30-2011 05:29 PM
sfchallenger "I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull."

Really? I always thought that was just sloppy scribing of the bulkheads on behalf of the original boatwrights. Good to know, I'll sleep better.
12-30-2011 05:24 PM
sfchallenger Well I have a furler (came with the boat), but it works with my hanked on sails. I have a 110 jib that is appropriate for winter conditions and a #3 that I use in the summer on the bay. Furling is not reefing, and while I have jib cars that adjust from the cockpit, I would strongly advocate a sail change over a furled reef. So many problems can arise with the lack of ability to reduce sail area in a hurry that I don't see a reason to risk it.
12-30-2011 04:22 PM
L124C
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
I have missed alot of sailing days this season due to high winds. The furling jib is near useluss, a parachute, when reefed. The main has no drive at all without at least some jib out. When out in these conditions, if I have to release the reefed jib because it is a big parachute edging me to a knockdown, and it goes flapping in a loooong gust, I see the whole rig being seriously stressed. It has never been replaced since 1981. I will be re-rigging anyway in a year or two (saving for it), so I was thinking why not replace with upgraded rigging? But truthfully, I may remove the roller furler and replace with hank-on jibs. That way I will be able to reef effectively, and still have control of the boat. And the properly shaped jib probably won't stress the rig nearly as much...
Getting off topic, but you need to move the cars for the jib sheets forward when you reef. You can't simply wind up the furler and expect the jib to perform. Your head sail may be worn out, but even a new one won't perform without this adjustment. A rough adjustment should have the projected sheet dividing the furled jib in half. Fine tune from there. If your reefing your head sail on a regular basis, it's simply too big (you didn't mention size). Though I have a 90% head sail, I fly a 100% on the SF Bay year around, and reef it occasionally. I know several skippers who fly 130's during the Summer and can't I imagine why.
While hanked on is the way to go for serious racing IMO, there are a lot of advantages to a furler for the Bay Sailor/Cruiser. I'll bet a loft can make an appropriate reefable head sail for you for less than than converting back to hanks and throwing away a furler. I tend to be a purest when it comes to sail shape and wouldn't have added a furler to my boat if it didn't come with one. However, I have no intention of getting rid of it!
12-03-2011 10:19 AM
smurphny
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailKing1 View Post
Here is a good article from west systems I used when I replaced the bulkheads in my islander.

WEST SYSTEM | Projects | Fiberglass Boat Repair and Restoration - Replacing damaged bulkheads
I had a bulkhead that was rotted out completely due to years of unattended leaking through chainplate openings. In addition to the method suggested By West, I would add this: Get a 5/8" drill rasp with a really long commercial-duty 3/8" extension. WITHOUT removing the tabbing, if in good shape, you can very effectively remove all the old rotten wood and clean up the insides of the tabbing structure with the rasp and drill. Make a thin vacuum head out of some aluminum flashing to remove dust as you go. A new bulkhead pattern can be easily made by trimming some pieces of 3' rosin paper little by little until it fits perfectly inside the curve of the hull. When the piece is ready to insert, really saturate the cleaned out "pocket" formed by the old tabbing with epoxy to fill any voids and coat the wood as well. I used some self tapping s.s. screws to draw the tabbing to the plywood and squeeze out excess epoxy. This method saves removing lockers, cabinets, etc. that might be attached and destroyed to get to the old tabbing to remove it. On my boat, the old tabbing was very heavily laid up and still in excellent shape. No reason to remove it. Removing it would have meant doing much demolition/reconstruction.
11-28-2011 01:14 PM
peterchech
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
On many boats you can see light through the layup. It is because they were laminated with clear resin - not a problem. It has nothing to do with strength.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
I totally agree with Brian's post above that indicates that "seeing light" through the fiberglass is not a sign of a problem. I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull. It would be wise to determine what the structural specs of the design are and if the bulkheads are intended to be structural components within the design. Take care and joy, Aythya crew

Well that is all comforting thanks
11-25-2011 07:13 PM
CaptainForce I totally agree with Brian's post above that indicates that "seeing light" through the fiberglass is not a sign of a problem. I would also suggest that bulkheads are often lightly tabbed to the hull to allow flex and prevent hard spots on the hull. It would be wise to determine what the structural specs of the design are and if the bulkheads are intended to be structural components within the design. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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