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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > sailing from california to hawaii on 25-27 footer
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Thread: sailing from california to hawaii on 25-27 footer Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-08-2011 01:49 AM
Agri To the OP I say its totally doable. In fact that is my current plan. I spent the last 8 months living and sailing (mostly single handed) on my Cal 25. Prior to this I had zero sailing experience. I would recommend taking a sailing course though. They are fairly inexpensive, especially in the off season and you learn a lot. The two week one I took was only about $600, and I left feeling supremely confident, and had gained some actual skills and knowledge to boot. I'd also suggest you read some of the books by Larry and Lin Pardy if you haven't already, very educational.

As far as the boat being able to carry enough supplies, the first boat to complete a solo non-stop around the world voyage was only 32 feet long, and he didn't use a water maker. Hawaii is not nearly as far as that. I have also done some extended wilderness hikes and have no problems carrying two-three weeks of food on my back. Seeing as a trip to Hawaii should only be about three-five weeks (from what I've read) for that size of a boat depending on speed, carrying enough supplies should not be a problem.

Its basically about having the guts to go for it. My Grandpa is 80 and he just bought his first sailboat this summer with zero previous sailing experience, now he's obsessed with using his spinnaker. I should mention though that he has owned/made a living off of and been sinking fishing and tugboats for years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by emoney View Post
I think there's a webpage somewhere that reads, "Don't want to work anymore or have any
responsibilities.....get a sailboat, it's that easy"

Not saying that's the OP's ideology, but overall, not just in sailing, there's this thought process
that "you don't have to get a job or need to be tied down in any way" and that it's as
easy as making a decision to do so, without prior planning, etc. Most of the negative
responses come because ultimately, it's the folks "left behind" (for lack of a better term)
that will be asked to pick up the pieces and repair the damage should that plan fail.
There's also a segment of the emerging population that doesn't believe working towards a
goal makes any sense; they'd prefer to start at the end, instead of the beginning. I actually
heard a person say to me, "I could either live in a crappy apartment with a roommate, or
I could be cool and live on a boat for less money", with visions of a 60 foot yacht in his
head. Once he was introduced to what his savings of $1500.00 actually purchased, needless
to say, he was quite disappointed. He didn't care about sailing, or even boating for that
matter, it was all because he didn't want to "be like 'them'", whoever they are.
I just wanted to say that this is exactly how I think and live. Didn't want to rent a apartment so I bought a boat for $3000. In fact I thought this pretty much verbatim
Quote:
I could either live in a crappy apartment with a roommate, or
I could be cool and live on a boat for less money
. Its not that we don't know how to work towards a goal we just do it differently.
12-07-2011 05:08 PM
casey1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruxandreams View Post
Shes coming right along, just pulled the old volvo out, and am getting ready to put my new yanmar in. Lots of good fun work, hope to have her back in the water by April and ready for some traveling! finally after going through 4 "heavy duty" cheap tarps that kept ripping, I bought a "super heavy duty tarp" that should hold up until the deck work is done. going to re teak the cockpit because its just such a traditional boat i cant make it all white and plastic looking. going to awlgrip and texture the forward deck "85%" of the total deck area. Learning a lot!
Sounds like progress,
Good Luck
12-07-2011 05:06 PM
Cruxandreams
Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
I think I remember your thread. I used to live in Annapolis, how is your boat going?
Shes coming right along, just pulled the old volvo out, and am getting ready to put my new yanmar in. Lots of good fun work, hope to have her back in the water by April and ready for some traveling! finally after going through 4 "heavy duty" cheap tarps that kept ripping, I bought a "super heavy duty tarp" that should hold up until the deck work is done. going to re teak the cockpit because its just such a traditional boat i cant make it all white and plastic looking. going to awlgrip and texture the forward deck "85%" of the total deck area. Learning a lot!
12-06-2011 12:43 PM
peterchech
Quote:
Originally Posted by joethecobbler View Post
Setting Priorities and Making choices.

I think the dreams lead us the paths we choose and it changes as we go.
Sailing is as fickle and unpredictable as the weather.
When I was dreaming, many had words of caution and doom.
After I "did it" I heard questions, amazement and curiosity.
I laugh now looking back and wonder why I ever let anyone hinder my course.
All the doubt and fear now seems silly.
As I contemplate the next casting off , hopefully in the next 8-10 months, I feel my heart race and feel great urgency, at the same time a bit of anxiety when I remember the "rough" days afloat. times when things failed, when weather was unexpectantly harsh as were the seas. And times of self doubt.
I think it's called being alive, as I recall it I feel more so.

As too the ever nagging issue of paying for it all.
For those fortunate,or wealthy,or having the tenacity and forethought to plan and execute a finely tuned and thouht out journey, bully for them !
As for myself the trip was less structured, more "as you go" with concerns for all matters , and funds for essentials bolstered by confidence that ,as always, life would go on and we would persevere.
being blessed with a trade than can be practiced almost anywhere and put down and picked up again with little detriment to its successful practice as a means of financial support.
Of course with this approach certain comforts, securities and long range assurances can be in question.
I guess it all comes down to setting priorites and making choices.

just don't wait too long, tommorrow is already here.

I am a tad envious... how do you do it then? What is your trade? What about kids/etc?
12-06-2011 12:43 PM
casey1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Many jobs (mine, for instance) are easier to hold than to get. That can change a bit with the economy but it's probably always the case to some extent. My industry is changing rapidly, so a year spent away means that I am a year behind my colleagues in terms of skills and being up-to-date with the latest developments in the field.

If I had an employer that could guarantee my position when I return, that would be really something, but I doubt my current employer would be in a position to keep my seat open for a year.

That said maybe my assessment is all wrong. I'm hoping to cast off in about five years---for one to two years---and am assuming I'll have to find a new job when I return, possibly in a new location. Maybe it'll be really easy. But the uncertainty is very scary.
I'm in the same boat as you, but certainty is also very scary, and there is really no such thing, so go for it.
12-06-2011 09:40 AM
joethecobbler Setting Priorities and Making choices.

I think the dreams lead us the paths we choose and it changes as we go.
Sailing is as fickle and unpredictable as the weather.
When I was dreaming, many had words of caution and doom.
After I "did it" I heard questions, amazement and curiosity.
I laugh now looking back and wonder why I ever let anyone hinder my course.
All the doubt and fear now seems silly.
As I contemplate the next casting off , hopefully in the next 8-10 months, I feel my heart race and feel great urgency, at the same time a bit of anxiety when I remember the "rough" days afloat. times when things failed, when weather was unexpectantly harsh as were the seas. And times of self doubt.
I think it's called being alive, as I recall it I feel more so.

As too the ever nagging issue of paying for it all.
For those fortunate,or wealthy,or having the tenacity and forethought to plan and execute a finely tuned and thouht out journey, bully for them !
As for myself the trip was less structured, more "as you go" with concerns for all matters , and funds for essentials bolstered by confidence that ,as always, life would go on and we would persevere.
being blessed with a trade than can be practiced almost anywhere and put down and picked up again with little detriment to its successful practice as a means of financial support.
Of course with this approach certain comforts, securities and long range assurances can be in question.
I guess it all comes down to setting priorites and making choices.

just don't wait too long, tommorrow is already here.
12-06-2011 12:21 AM
JedNeck A guy could always learn a trade, pick up work when he needs it and sail away the rest of the time. You just have to set your priorities.
12-05-2011 10:20 PM
WDS123 Let us honor thOse dreamers who have the ideals to believe they can cast off with a beaten up vessel and more vision than experience. They are the ones that blaze the trail for the rest of us.
12-05-2011 09:00 PM
Faster Like Tommays, we try to balance.. our son has similarly chosen his job and workplace more as a way of supporting his (sailing) habit... his wife is from the east coast and they could certainly live a lot cheaper there... thankfully they don't want to and our precious granddaughter is always nearby.

I could earn a lot more money in Industry, but the vacation benefits and lifestyle are suiting us both, and since my wife works in a preschool we get our summers off together.. All around not a bad tradeoff....
12-05-2011 07:41 PM
tommays I have said this many times before BUT at 55 i never understand the all or nothing thinking and find it simpler to have kept my work/playtime in some semblance of balance

I picked a place to live that is close to the water BUT not so close you get the down side as i have lived waterfront and tired of the floods

BUT it allows to me to go sailing as much as i want ,be it a few hours after work to unwind or a weekend or longer

I tried to raise my children the same way and my 24 year old daughter works her job around race nights so she can get out and keep some balance and not burnout
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