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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Important for the Ladies
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-27-2011 01:43 PM
Capt Len Could it be that the social success I've attained over the years was due to my choice of the cruising vessel of the future? A wooden home built gaff rigged Spray?
11-27-2011 12:32 PM
HenryMonsun My experience is that the "less into it" crew members (may include wifes, friends, children etc) really appreciate a boat with a high "comfort factor", in particular when the going gets a bit rougher which on any cruise will happen sooner or later.

COMFORT FACTOR = disp/(.65*(.7*lwl+.3*loa)*beam^1.33) This is an empirical term developed by yacht designer Ted Brewer. Large numbers indicate a smoother, more comfortable motion in a sea way. The equation favors heavy boats with lots of overhang and a narrow beam. These are all factors that slow down a boats response in violent conditions, which is a major factor in reducing crew fatigue. This design philosophy is contrary to many modern racer / cruisers. A value of 30 - 40 is recommended for a cruising boat. Racing designs are typically less than 30, and a full keel, Colin Archer design, could be as high as 55. Tedís recommendations were used for the optimal values, with a minimum of 25 and a maximum of 50.

Design Basics
11-27-2011 10:41 AM
ext222
Quote:
Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
You haven't factored in that you got one of the only ones around that are like that.

I'm joking, but not by THAT much - most women prefer comfort and security to adventure.
If people spent half the energy that they spend weighing the pros and cons of a potential boat on weighing the character traits of their potential mate, buying the boat would be much simpler.

But you are right, I won the wife lottery. Now I will step back and un-hijack the thread.
11-25-2011 10:33 PM
canucksailorguy Capn Len, if you survive that catch and release comment, you'll be fortunate!
11-25-2011 09:06 PM
Capt Len Better to be a good sport about the gender thing. Practice catch and release. Sooner or later you find a keeper and then be amazed at how your life has changed.
11-25-2011 08:42 PM
SloopJonB
Quote:
Originally Posted by ext222 View Post
Not directed at the OP in any way, rather at the general idea that women need to be mollycoddled more than men, and that maybe men would be happier leaving them at home:

I think the first list to make should be "What to look for in a wife"!

Every adventure I have undertaken in my life, from kayaking to BASE jumping to scuba diving to sailing, my wife has jumped into with equal enthusiasm. (And she is usually better at it than I am.)

It must be miserable to be married to someone who isn't as big of a nut as you are.
You haven't factored in that you got one of the only ones around that are like that.

I'm joking, but not by THAT much - most women prefer comfort and security to adventure.
11-25-2011 05:23 PM
tdw
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
This is a 35' Wauquieq Pretorian
As you can see the wheel comes to within an inch of the seats on the side.
The only way to get to the helm position is to climb on top of the seats then climb down.
For some people this is a problem.

David , thanks for the clarification and I can but agree that the need to climb over the cockpit seats to get to the wheel is a less than perfect arrangement.

Regarding centreline berth, I was thinking you meant a centreline sea berth. Centreline island double berth is a nice thing no doubt though I'm not convinced about them when they are under the cockpit. CruisingDad, though reckons this works in his Catalina but hell, what would he know? We are OK with our v-berth that has good width forward. We sleep heads forward in winter but in summer we reverse cos better ventilation.

In my summation, which btw was based on what the Wombet likes, I did forget to mention tankage. We carry 600 litres of water and 400l of diesel plus we have a watermaker. For power generation twin 185ah solar cells, wind generator and balmar high output alternator. The wind generator btw is rarely used. Even though ours is one of the quietest around it is still noisy and quite frankly is nowhere near as useful as the solar cells. Were we to be in a less sunny environment then this could well change.
11-25-2011 04:00 PM
ext222 Not directed at the OP in any way, rather at the general idea that women need to be mollycoddled more than men, and that maybe men would be happier leaving them at home:

I think the first list to make should be "What to look for in a wife"!

Every adventure I have undertaken in my life, from kayaking to BASE jumping to scuba diving to sailing, my wife has jumped into with equal enthusiasm. (And she is usually better at it than I am.)

It must be miserable to be married to someone who isn't as big of a nut as you are.
11-25-2011 03:29 PM
PCP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melrna View Post
..
I love the fact that she put on the top of her list, helm station she can get too without having to climb over the lazeratte to get to. ...
You raise an interesting point that is at the origin of the modern concept of the two wheels setup: If you have a small wheel you would lose the best and more comfortable position to sail a heeled boat, I mean sitting on a side.

with a small wheel you cannot reach the wheel siting there, or you have just to bend forward making the position uncomfortable. With a big wheel it is more difficult to go forward but you can comfortably steer the boat sitting on the side with the foot on the pedestal.

The two wheel setup have just solved that. On an older boat you have too chose between a better sailing seating position or an easier passage on the cockpit

Regards

Paulo
11-25-2011 03:12 PM
PCP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
A workable galley and decent storage would have been my wife's top pick, ... cockpit was a bit more ergonomically friendly, esp while heeled.
The same with my wife, that, water tankage and a head with a separated shower. It has been quite amusing because on the boat shows that's about all she takes notes and then when I saw some boat I like (normally good sailing boats) she does not like them most of the time. They miss on some of the points that she find important.

We had a 36ft Bavaria and she compares that boat with all the boats we see on boat shows. The problem is that the Bavaria was a very good boat in what regards tankage and storage space. Even the galley was good for a 36ft boat.

I remember some bigger boats that I found interesting like the "old" Jeanneau 42i that she surprisingly found that had less storage space than the Bavaria in what regards storage.

It was of no use to argue with her that the weight distribution of the boat was very important and that the tanks should better be on both sides of the boat. She just see that is just a big waste of space

A boat is a compromise and each one has it's own. It is better to have a look without such a complete list and see how the boat meet the criteria you and your wife find more important.

My wife had been with me in some test sails and she found quickly that a narrow boat sails with a lot of heel while a modern beamy boat sails with much less heel. If the choose was all hers, she would chose a boat like the RM 1200, a boat with a huge initial stability and that sails with less heel.

I guess that heel is important while cooking. You have just to look to the new Benetau, the Sense and the Oceanis: The women have won, they want boats that heel not much while sailing and they have got it

Regards

Paulo
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