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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > What do you call the opening on the bulwark
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: What do you call the opening on the bulwark Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-02-2011 06:04 PM
Capt Len Take an 8 ft length of tared marline. double it taut between two stout points about hip high.Take an old hemp rope and cut into shorts (7 or 8") Unravel into yarns.Take one yarn in both hands,bring it from beneath the doubled marline folding it in half.Bring the two equal parts around towards you and down between the marlin lines.Pull tight Do this again till your hands bleed, snugging them tight once in while with block of wood or hammer. Seize both ends and present one end to the shroud and seize it there. Now tightly wrap the baggy around the shroud working up from the lower seizing Seize the end bit .TA DA. It's a bit more windage but worth it because it's so damm salty looking.Gaffers Rule. By Howdy Dothat .
12-02-2011 05:13 PM
WanderingStar Rope yarns arranged in the rigging to protect the sails from chafe.
12-02-2011 11:16 AM
Seadawgy impress and amaze your friends..next question..what is a baggy wrinkle??
12-02-2011 11:10 AM
Seadawgy
hand bomb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boasun View Post
Hand bomb??? Never heard of that term. No such animal... and this according to my lexicons for Merchant marine & seamanship.

Warping is when you move a vessel along a pier or a wharf with the vessel's mooring lines.

Other openings in bulwarks are the Freeing ports and scuppers
"I saw this was asked once before but I am not sure of the answer. In the transportation business, when something is stacked or loaded by hand, it is called "hand bomb". For example, "that 40' ocean container from Shanghai was hand bombed." It would mean that the cartons were not loaded onto a skid, and each individual carton would have to be offloaded by hand. Some people use the term "Hand Bomb", while others use "Hand Balm". Thinking about it though, I should think the best spelling would be "Hand Bond", as the cartons are being loaded securely, and thus "bonded" by hand. I am not sure of the origin of this term, but it is very frequently heard in the North American transporation business, as well as warehouses and distribution centres."

believe that it refers to warping by "hand" as opposed to warping a vessel mechanically as in using the locomotives of the Panama canal locks
12-01-2011 10:50 PM
Capt Len Hand bomb--May be a west coast term, but if you ask any working man around here he knows about lift that bale, tote that barge. and lexicon be dammed.
12-01-2011 10:05 PM
Boasun Hand bomb??? Never heard of that term. No such animal... and this according to my lexicons for Merchant marine & seamanship.

Warping is when you move a vessel along a pier or a wharf with the vessel's mooring lines.

Other openings in bulwarks are the Freeing ports and scuppers
11-30-2011 11:33 PM
rugosa
what is "warping" a vessel

towing a vessel
11-30-2011 11:05 PM
simpsoned My wife calls it the thingy where the rope that goes tot he dock goes...

Ed
Skipper, Das Dawg Haus
"I'm the skipper when my wife lets me"
11-30-2011 10:35 PM
Capt Len If the anchor rode goes thru it --Hawse pipe' If for mooring lines --Fairlead (chocks) As long as crew knows what you are yelling call it.If you want to hand bomb a vessel along a dock or along side another you are warping. Hope your help can follow directions as one leads, others take orders.
11-30-2011 12:14 AM
SlowButSteady It's a Thingamajig. My boat has all sorts of Thingamajigs, and Whatsits, and Dodads.
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