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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Tools Aboard How do you store em?
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Thread: Tools Aboard How do you store em? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-19-2011 06:58 PM
tdw Shot of the storage on the Womboat. Soft bags instead of hard boxes would make it easier to pack and allow a bit more room. Large organisers are under the three boxes, largest box is under the small organisers. I keep power tools elsewhere.



ps - Sloop ... ref your dig at Stanley ... I can only agree. They were once the ant's pants but honestly the stuff I see today is just rubbish. I even bought cheap copies of Stanley organisers cos they were quite obviously better than the real thing.
12-19-2011 09:20 AM
billmwright Silica Gel will absorb moisture (weather it's enclosed or not). If you use enough of it (larger volumes) it will work in a large area. Also for smaller areas and being on your sail boat it might be best to get something that is moisture indicating (you can see color change when absorbed) and a product that you get extras in a zipper seal moisture barrier bag so you can keep them handy to use. Try something like this:

Dry-Packs by Absorbent Industries - Moisture Absorbing Silica Gel Indicating Packets (Desiccant) - SilicaGelPackets.com
12-17-2011 05:04 PM
TakeFive I always thought a soft bag would be better than a hard box due to the unusual shape of the limited storage areas. During my first season on the boat I used this cheapo bag from Harbor Freight:


...but as the year went on and more tools made a one-way trip from my house to the boat, I needed more room and a heavier, more durable bag. After a lot of shopping around, I went all-out and got this sizeable, very hefty bag from Home Depot:


I really like the tool wall in the middle and pockets around the side, because I can see all the tools from above instead of having to dig through a pile. The heavy rubber feet prevent the bag from sliding off the cabin top when I need to take the bag topsides.

As for moisture prevention, I assumed that silica gel and other small preventers would not last inside the bag because of the way the bag breathes. The solution for me was to minimize moisture throughout the boat with a dehumidifier when on shore power, and DampRid canisters when on the hard. I've posted about the dehumidifier in another thread. Since I'm just a daysailor, I don't spend enough time at sea to worry about moisture while away from shore power.
12-17-2011 04:30 PM
MedSailor
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Silica gel works in sealed containers. So unless your tool box is a Pelican case...odds are it is just the wrong application for silica gel. If the box can breath, the gel will absorb all it can but the sea will patiently keep supplying more moisture.
HS is correct. Silica gel just reduces moisture in an enclosed space until saturated. Oxygen absorbers (iron powder) might do a better job as oxygen IS what rusts metal, though they will eventually "saturate" as well. My guess is that since they are a rusting metal themselves they will remain able to absorb oxygen for longer than silica gel will remain useful.

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/i..._absorbers.htm

Medsailor
12-17-2011 04:08 PM
hellosailor Silica gel works in sealed containers. So unless your tool box is a Pelican case...odds are it is just the wrong application for silica gel. If the box can breath, the gel will absorb all it can but the sea will patiently keep supplying more moisture.
12-17-2011 04:03 PM
SloopJonB
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
I used to keep mothballs with my tools since they sublimate and leave a coating that locks rust. But apparently those vapors are not good to breath in any quantity so I splurged on some 3M "chips" that are sold to block corrosion the same way. They look like waxy yellow postage stamps, you scatter them around the things/places where you want to discourage rust and replace them as they melt away.
Sold in tool specialty shops and as shooting/gunsmith supplies, and they seem to work very well, in the usual 3M fashion. If all else fails--call 3M, they can tell you where to buy any of their products.
Has anyone tried a bag of silica gel in their toolbox? It SHOULD, according to its reputation, keep things dry and it can be baked to reactivate it when it has absorbed all the moisture it can.
12-17-2011 03:36 PM
hellosailor I used to keep mothballs with my tools since they sublimate and leave a coating that locks rust. But apparently those vapors are not good to breath in any quantity so I splurged on some 3M "chips" that are sold to block corrosion the same way. They look like waxy yellow postage stamps, you scatter them around the things/places where you want to discourage rust and replace them as they melt away.
Sold in tool specialty shops and as shooting/gunsmith supplies, and they seem to work very well, in the usual 3M fashion. If all else fails--call 3M, they can tell you where to buy any of their products.
12-17-2011 12:25 PM
sailordave
Quote:
Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
It is not referred to as a JUNK drawer, its official appellation is Dad's drawer.

+10!

I have one of those in my house!
12-17-2011 05:42 AM
arisatx
Quote:
Originally Posted by kb3pwc View Post
For the past few years we have used a commercially available black and red tool bag (satchel shape) that includes side pockets on the outside and the inner portion of the satchel holds the larger tools but I have to say, it is not an easy to use solution and it is hard to stow.

How do you organize and store your tools? There are so many approaches from hard tool boxes, pockets that are rolled up, trays that have slots for each tool. It needs to be functional for storage, easy to handle with visibility for accessing tools. Your thoughts and ideas are so needed...

with thanks,

Leslie

s/v Tango, Cabo Rico 34
On the Hard
Lankford Bay Marina
Chester River, MD
Leslie:
We use a Veto Pro Pac XL tool bag - not inexpensive, but bulletproof and well thought out:




While not specifically in the "tool" category, for shackles, big thimbles, we find these canvas "parachute" bags pretty handy:

12-15-2011 05:45 PM
captflood GREETINGS EARTHLINGS I use childs butty boxes lots of different colours and all about the same size. they are cheap and held closed with a off-cut from an lod inertube tyer. Brass bits . stainless screws, Sail fittings. Running riging, standing rigging, engine tools, engine spears. bungy and ends,Electrical repair, and electrical testing equip. all small and very stackable into little places on the boat and they are cheap. GO SAFE !
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