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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Chainplates
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Thread: Chainplates Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-08-2012 12:41 PM
SloopJonB
Re: Chainplates

Quote:
Originally Posted by overbored View Post
electropolishing is not necessary and does nothing to protect the stainless. mirrior mechanical polishing is the best. any type of polishing, be it mechanical or electropolishing will expose the free iron on the surface and it will rust if exposed to moisture. in addition to the electropolishing process most all parts are passivated and allowed to air dry before returned to the customer. it is the Passivation of the stainless that removes the free iron from the surface and should be done to all stainless parts. Passavation can be done to your parts by soaking in cirtus or nitric acid. soaking in Spotless Stainless will passivate the parts just as well.
I think that the members here are referring to passivation when they say electropolishing. From what my electropolisher told me about the process, passivation is an (the) integral part of the process. The combination of electricity and a nitric acid bath is what gets the iron out to a decent depth.

Also, I beg to differ about it doing nothing - the parts I had done years ago still look the same as the day they were installed. That doesn't happen when they are merely wheel polished and buffed. In that case they start out looking the same but it only lasts a couple of years before they start to lose their gloss and the old brown stains start to make an appearance in corners and on edges and particularly on welds.
04-08-2012 03:23 AM
overbored
Re: Chainplates

electropolishing is not necessary and does nothing to protect the stainless. mirrior mechanical polishing is the best. any type of polishing, be it mechanical or electropolishing will expose the free iron on the surface and it will rust if exposed to moisture. in addition to the electropolishing process most all parts are passivated and allowed to air dry before returned to the customer. it is the Passivation of the stainless that removes the free iron from the surface and should be done to all stainless parts. Passavation can be done to your parts by soaking in cirtus or nitric acid. soaking in Spotless Stainless will passivate the parts just as well.
04-08-2012 02:33 AM
mitiempo
Re: Chainplates

I'm sure they will be trouble free for decades.

3/16" thicker - how thick were the original chainplates?
04-08-2012 02:29 AM
Cruiser2B
Re: Chainplates

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
Stainless is never plated. It is polished and then electropolished to remove the free iron particles that will cause corrosion.
Thanks for the info/correction. I am sure whatever the additional process is you could tell from my post that I had chosen only to polish the chainplates I made. I made this decision based on chainplates I removed and what material I decided to make the new ones out of. Only one of my orginal chainplates showed any signs of crevis corrosion and it was minimal at that. All others had some rust staining but that was about it. Those were 40+ yrs old. My new ones are 3/16" thicker, 1/4" wider and polished over the orginals. Original made great backing plates! I felt that there was no addition processes necessary. Time will tell!
04-07-2012 02:31 PM
mitiempo
Re: Chainplates

Stainless is never plated. It is polished and then electropolished to remove the free iron particles that will cause corrosion.
04-07-2012 08:00 AM
Cruiser2B
Re: Chainplates

i know this is an older thread but people may still be researching doing their own chainplates. i replaced all 8 of mine on my Alberg 30 this winter. i used 316ss and made them out of larger stock than factory units. Total cost was $80.00. that price included all the material. i was able to make all 8 from a 6ft piece of 1.5"x6'ft piece. obviously it would have cost more if i had someone else do it but i enjoyed the experience. i only polished mine...no plating. the factory 304 units lasted 40yrs so i figure my new much thicker and wider units should last me quite a while!






svsalacia.blogspot.com
04-06-2012 06:30 PM
SloopJonB
Re: Chainplates

Quote:
Originally Posted by medicrene View Post
I had the same problem with my Hudson Force 50. I had pulled the chain plates and had them repaired. They welded another thick piece of stainless over the crack and extened the repair so that at least one bolt was also included in the repair area. It works fine.


Is it worth risking your rig, deck, crew and most importantly SELF, just to save the few extra bucks new chains would have cost you? It isn't that expensive to make new ones up. I would think it would be less than merely painting the bottom of that monster (just how many acres of wetted surface DO those boats have?).
04-06-2012 06:26 PM
SloopJonB
Re: Chainplates

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
No, it's to achieve a totally smooth surface with no microscopic crevices that will allow crevice corrosion to take hold.

Stainless steel does not rust on the surfaces exposed to oxygen, but they do corrode and fail in an anaerobic environment, which is usually the part of the chainplate that is encased in the deck.
Polishing is not the same as ELECTROpolishing. The former merely makes the metal shiny and pretty. The latter is an electrical acid bath process that removes the iron molecules from a thin layer of the surface. This gives corrosion no place to start.

If you want nice, shiny AND corrosion proof chains, first get them cut, drilled & ground to final shape. Next, sand them and polish/buff with a wheel polisher. When they look like you want them, have them electropolished. When you get them back they will no longer have the perfect, shiny finish but a SMALL amount of buffing will bring it back.

You have to be careful with this last step as the protective layer is apparently only .001" to .0015" so you can buff right through it if you go to heavy on the final buffing.

I did mine this way years ago and they still look like they were just buffed.
04-06-2012 11:45 AM
medicrene
Re: Chainplates

I had the same problem with my Hudson Force 50. I had pulled the chain plates and had them repaired. They welded another thick piece of stainless over the crack and extened the repair so that at least one bolt was also included in the repair area. It works fine.
04-06-2012 11:06 AM
BubbleheadMd
Re: Chainplates

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdecon View Post
is the polishing just for aesthetics ?
No, it's to achieve a totally smooth surface with no microscopic crevices that will allow crevice corrosion to take hold.

Stainless steel does not rust on the surfaces exposed to oxygen, but they do corrode and fail in an anaerobic environment, which is usually the part of the chainplate that is encased in the deck.
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