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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Production blue water boats
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Thread: Production blue water boats Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-31-2009 11:07 PM
SteveMH For my money, a Valiant, the cockpit is a bit small but acquaintances have one and they say it is a dream to sail with a great galley, good sea motion and bullet proof construction. The tumblehome stern is a thing of beauty unto itself.
07-31-2009 09:43 AM
damies
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
but not everyone listens!!
So often the problem here too.... Personally I am working my skills back up after not having sailed for nearly 20 years (I can't believe I let it go that long between sails) So for the first dozen sails on my boat I took someone who had sailed recently (a colleague and my Step Dad). And I was an experienced off shore sailor 20 years ago, but being landlocked for 20 years makes you rusty and changing from mono's to a tri meant some new things to learn, so I took the cautious approach that I would advise others to take.

My plans are to start with this boat, get my skills back up then upgrade to a bigger boat that I can do some longer coastal hopping and spend a few weeks aboard at a time with the family, then maybe further down the track upgrade again to a comfortable live aboard.

Do as I do not as I say... oh hang on...... Never mind
07-30-2009 01:17 PM
Cruisingdad
Quote:
Originally Posted by damies View Post
This boat (12') was a successful circumnavigator so yes it's possible in anything....


But ask yourself how comfortable you would be on your chosen boat for several weeks at sea (no land in sight). I have not personally done a long stint at sea, but know I couldn't do it in a boat like the one above, nor my current 25' Tri, I would want something bigger.

Most of the threads I have seen here about people looking for recommendations on blue water boat seem to be from people who are relatively new to sailing, or offshore sailing. Around here (Oz) the usual recommendation is you do some coastal trips in your boat, get comfortable with that first, after a few years of regular off shore sailing experience then consider a short blue water trip, this would be the point at which you decide whether your 30' boat is suitable or if you need a different boat.


For those interested here is a site that details both successful and not circumnavigation attempts in small boats (or bathtubs if you like ) Famous Small Boats

Dave.
Dave,

We reccomend the same here (US) - but not everyone listens!! The reality is that many people buy the bullet proof tanks because they think it will make up for their lack of sailing (and seamanship skills). THey also would love to have a boat that can circum - even in reality most of them will never leave sight of land. What I have really been trying to bang into peoples head is that every boat has a tradeoff - and the tradeoff of a bulletproof shoe box for coastal is considerable. And remember - we are all coastal in reality. No one sails out to sea to just set there out at sea.

My opinions.

- CD
07-30-2009 10:40 AM
TQA Great web site in the above post is and very humbling. I had not realised that so many others had circumnavigated in sub 20 footers.

I had read about Shane Acton and "SHRIMPY" before I went cruising in a 37 foot steel ketch and anytime it was a little hairy I would dig out my copy and read a bit.
07-30-2009 09:30 AM
damies This boat (12') was a successful circumnavigator so yes it's possible in anything....


But ask yourself how comfortable you would be on your chosen boat for several weeks at sea (no land in sight). I have not personally done a long stint at sea, but know I couldn't do it in a boat like the one above, nor my current 25' Tri, I would want something bigger.

Most of the threads I have seen here about people looking for recommendations on blue water boat seem to be from people who are relatively new to sailing, or offshore sailing. Around here (Oz) the usual recommendation is you do some coastal trips in your boat, get comfortable with that first, after a few years of regular off shore sailing experience then consider a short blue water trip, this would be the point at which you decide whether your 30' boat is suitable or if you need a different boat.


For those interested here is a site that details both successful and not circumnavigation attempts in small boats (or bathtubs if you like ) Famous Small Boats

Dave.
07-29-2009 02:06 AM
CKH
Circumnavigaters in history

Just for the fun of it, search:
Joshua Slocum Society Single Handed Circumnavigators.
It looks like some of them did it in a bathtub.
Skill and determination seem to be the most necessary ingredient.
Of course, those who failed are not listed.
09-14-2007 08:16 PM
captainchetco
Another boring point of view

The Albergs and Pearsons mentioned are indeed sound boats that sail well. Their downsides are: They sail on their ear which reduces their comfortability and their shape makes for poor use of interior spaces.

Their are lots of great cruising boats; Valiant is one of the best, as it is strong, comfortable and comparably fast yet very seaworthy. Don't forget the creelock/Pacific Seacraft boats, Gulfstars are a lesser known excellent cruiser which gives good stowage and decent speed, particularly upwind. The list of good cruisers is long and highly variable. I would however avoid the downwind planing hull designs as they are abastard going into a sea.

As someone noted, nearly any boat can be taken cruising, but some are better than others. I prefer sufficient speed and pointing ability that I can make port and ride out the storm at the yacht club bar.
02-07-2007 04:06 PM
RicCooper
Offshore cruiser

Just loock at www.geronimosaintmartin.com.ar
He was 10 years sailing in a 18 foot fiberglass sailing boat from Bs Aires to Artic pole and returning to la Patagonia.
I meet once him in Colonia yacht club in Uruguay and saw the boat. If that was possible over 10 years so you can trusth in Hunter, Benneteu, Jeanneau and all other boats to do everything.
Also in Piriapolis, other port in the Atlantic coast of Uruguay, where sailing boats coming from France, Germany, Spain, etc, where the cruisers prepare the boats and them self to cruise Cape Horn and Antartic, you will find a lot of not traditional sailing boats made of fiberglass, wood or steel that were not made so strongs like Hunter or Beneteau. They also are some years at sea and still doing miles without this worry.
Hope you will excuse my English.
Ric
02-04-2007 11:49 PM
brak What was done to it? Why is it for sale?
Also, what is the draft - looks pretty deep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormann
This boat has recently been refit and equipped for exactly thetype of cruising you want to do.

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...&pbsint=&ps=30
02-04-2007 03:45 AM
chris_gee Get a grip guys. If you want to go as fast as posible around the world fly. If you might go to to Israel to see the cuzzies fly. If you want to do Chesapeake and the odd flip over to the Bahamas thats one thing, if you are really serious about doing more maybe you will do the hard yards first.
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