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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Slip from Hell...
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Thread: Slip from Hell... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-05-2012 10:24 PM
sevseasail
Re: Slip from Hell...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
I had a near identical slip for years and I grew to like it. My plan was to enter the slip with a couple of fenders deployed on my port side and take the bow to the empty corner behind my slip. Here, I would step off the bow with an aft spring and a bow line in hand. It was simple to shove the bow back out and pull the stern in. I found, with the fenders in place, I could easily walk the boat back into the slip. When departing, having the bow pointed out, I kept a line from the bow to a warp around the starboard piling. By releasing this line last, I could turn into the wind if necessary, and easily motor out.

I like that... that's how I will do it (now that you have explained it....)
06-05-2012 09:51 PM
TakeFive
Re: Slip from Hell...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt-T View Post
Maybe work on your backing skills?? ...Hey... I didn't say it was a "good" solution!!
Actually, backing up a wing or fin keel boat (not a full keel) is a great solution, especially since the OP has an outboard. A hard link is not required, but greatly increases maneuverability at slow speed. Here's mine. I have wheel steering, but this could work just fine with a tiller:


I back up most of the time when transiting my fairway. When you go forward, your stern swings out, which wreaks havoc in confined spaces like OP has. Going in reverse, the boat swivels about her keel, and it's much like driving a car. Since I have a wheel, I actually stand in front of the wheel facing backwards. Standing in front of a tiller would work just fine too.

I back into my slip because the finger piers are not long enough to board into the cockpit when pulling front-in, and my bow is too high to board there. Backing in might make things easier for the OP getting in, but pulling in forward works fine too. Either way, I'd strongly suggest backing out of the slip. If you pull in forward (like shown in the OP's picture), just back out and steer the rudder-motor appropriately. Don't try to change direction in the confines of the marina - go all the way out of the marina before changing directions. If you pull in backward instead, walk your boat along the wall until you're out of the slip, give a good hard push to your stern to get the boat twisting in the right direction, and put in reverse with rudder (and preferably motor) hard to starboard. Prior to doing this, you could also move the stern out with a spring line to the bow, motor in forward with rudder and motor to port. This would push your stern out, from which you could then reverse out of the marina.

I have some tight confines and very tricky tidal currents, which require me to use reverse for all my docking (regardless of current direction), and half of my departing (when the current is pushing me into the boats across the fairway). I just filmed some videos of this, so maybe they will give you some ideas:





06-05-2012 11:38 AM
SVAuspicious
Re: Slip from Hell...

Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
Nay...I think I got you beat
Wow. That's some slip. I'm impressed. I think I'm a good boat handler but that slip, especially with the cat in place and the prospect of a boat on the opposing pier is intimidating. I'm going to print a copy of those photos and bring them to the MYC 'vous to talk about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
So that's it for dockside help for me. I'm just going to wave 'em off with a "Thanks anyway!" and go through my routine.
Bingo. One of the briefing points for crew before bringing a boat into the dock is to remind them who is in charge. It is NOT the person standing on the dock. No one passes a line ashore without my say so. I don't want bows pulled in or sterns dragged into docks.

Routines are good. They are routines because they work.

Please don't get me started on bow thrusters. *grin*

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
My problem is notpeople okn the dock, but guests on the boat who want to help. I usually have to have them just sit down and let me bring her in.
It takes longer to brief crew than to bring the boat in.

I generally back into slips and when I do have crew it amazes me how hard it is for some crew to understand that the place for the person assigned to a bow line is in the stern. *sigh* Clearly a failure to communicate on my part but I'll keep trying.
06-05-2012 10:53 AM
chef2sail
Re: Slip from Hell...

T37chefs slip was a "Houdini" slip for sure. I have seen it. sEems likkme they should put a PB in it.

JAScrumpf- The poeple in our club know how to help with doick lines as they have sailboats also. I also do a lot of siglehanding. Once I get my midhip spring line on ( my first line on and last off) there is nothing they can really do to hurt.

My problem is notpeople okn the dock, but guests on the boat who want to help. I usually have to have them just sit down and let me bring her in.

Dave
06-05-2012 09:49 AM
jaschrumpf
Re: Slip from Hell...

Personally, I cringe when I see a boat buddy ready to "help" me dock. I am usually always single handing, and I have a system I follow when I back in. The last time someone "helped" me, he was standing by on the finger dock (port side) of my slip with my starboard side stern line (the last line I put on). I tossed him the line I wanted put on first, and he dropped it into the water, and then tossed me another line that was handy... my port spring line, which is no damn good for tying me to the dock.

The breeze pushed me away from the dock to where my port stern line wouldn't reach him and toward the next boat in the slip. I've strung lines between the pilings, so I was able to grab the upwind side with the boat hook and drag myself back, but it was a clusterdocking and it looked like I'd never done it before.

So that's it for dockside help for me. I'm just going to wave 'em off with a "Thanks anyway!" and go through my routine.
06-05-2012 08:34 AM
Danjcon
Re: Slip from Hell 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef View Post
Nay...I think I got you beat

My old slip was 36 feet from piling to opposing pier, with a LOA of 44' (boat plus dingy on davit) in which I had to do a 360 degree turn in the basin plus another 90 degrees to get in the slip. Not fun on a windy day, however I got pretty good at learning to maneuver my boat in tight spaces.

The slip is highlighted in red below. I would enter the basin forward; poke the bow close to the pit, then reverse to port with a strong burst, then hard to starboard with a few strong burst to swing the bow around, (sometimes another hard to port in reverse if the wind was not favorable), then forward and hard to port again to point to bow into the slip.

Backing into the basin then a simple turn to port did not work well. Coming in forward and back to starboard was not going to work either, especially with a right turning screw. It was even more fun, or crazy, in the Fall when boats decided they would tie up to be pulled for winter, at the opposing pier/bulkhead or the pump out which was located on the outside pier. It was still doable, but very tight and required someone to jump off and walk the bow in and some creative use of spring lines.



and the full view, see the catamaran!

T37Chef...That's the slip I have now! My boat is only 31 ft, but with a modified full keel, control in reverse sucks. Sunday was pretty breezy and it was interesting getting into the slip. Being new to the marina, it was great that there always seems to be somebody there to assist when needed.
06-04-2012 10:18 PM
SlowButSteady
Re: Slip from Hell...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CorvetteGuy View Post
Why do people insist on parking a boat when you actually dock it. you park a car not a boat. Do you drive your boat or steer it??? Do you have fenders or bumpers??? just a brain fart
Oh, I i'll bet you even have some fancy special name for the pointy end .
06-04-2012 10:09 PM
sailor50
Re: Slip from Hell...

There is nothing so simple as messing around with boats! You could walk (as by hand) around such a special place - admit it - what are you paying for a powerboat slip?
06-04-2012 08:14 PM
T37Chef
Slip from Hell 2

Nay...I think I got you beat

My old slip was 36 feet from piling to opposing pier, with a LOA of 44' (boat plus dingy on davit) in which I had to do a 360 degree turn in the basin plus another 90 degrees to get in the slip. Not fun on a windy day, however I got pretty good at learning to maneuver my boat in tight spaces.

The slip is highlighted in red below. I would enter the basin forward; poke the bow close to the pit, then reverse to port with a strong burst, then hard to starboard with a few strong burst to swing the bow around, (sometimes another hard to port in reverse if the wind was not favorable), then forward and hard to port again to point to bow into the slip.

Backing into the basin then a simple turn to port did not work well. Coming in forward and back to starboard was not going to work either, especially with a right turning screw. It was even more fun, or crazy, in the Fall when boats decided they would tie up to be pulled for winter, at the opposing pier/bulkhead or the pump out which was located on the outside pier. It was still doable, but very tight and required someone to jump off and walk the bow in and some creative use of spring lines.



and the full view, see the catamaran!

06-04-2012 06:31 PM
CorvetteGuy
Re: Slip from Hell...

Why do people insist on parking a boat when you actually dock it. you park a car not a boat. Do you drive your boat or steer it??? Do you have fenders or bumpers??? just a brain fart
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